Santiago de Compostela Transportation

  • Santiago de Compostela
    Santiago de Compostela
    by lotharscheer
  • Santiago de Compostela
    Santiago de Compostela
    by lotharscheer
  • Santiago de Compostela
    Santiago de Compostela
    by lotharscheer

Most Recent Transportation in Santiago de Compostela

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    Bus from the Airport

    by lotharscheer Updated Mar 11, 2014
    Santiago de Compostela
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    Bus between the airport and Plaza de Galicia in Santiago, stopping at different points Pazo de Congresos, Capilla San Lázaro, the bus station, the railway station, Rúa da Rosa. € 3 one way and € 5,1o retur.

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    To Santiago by bus

    by zaffaran Updated Jul 27, 2013
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    I took the direct bus from Porto Airport ; no-one at the info desk knew about the bus, but it operated (Lisbon-Santiago); departure 9.45; don't believe people who say that there is no such a connection. The bus was almost empty (not surprising considering the lack of info), air-conditioned, with a very helpful driver.

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    by bus to Astorga

    by globetrott Updated Nov 2, 2012

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    I came by bus to Astorga and the central busstation is just a few steps from the epicopal palace, the cathedral and the medieval townwall, so you actually dont need a streetmap to find your way as a tourist or peregrino.
    Buses in Spain are really cheap like you see in my picture: from Belorado to Burgos i just payed 3,01 euros one way and the funny prices with single cents at the end come by the fact that 8% taxes will be added to all bus-tickets !
    Buses were always quite comfortable in Spain, the only problem for me was the fact that for larger distances along the Camino the buses go only 1 or 2 times each morning and when you miss them, you have to wait another day !

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    Walking the Camino through

    by globetrott Written Oct 26, 2012

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    When you are walking the Camino through you will find a single cafe for peregrinos (see it in my restaurant-tip). Albergues are not to be found there as far as I remember, but this village is just a few km after Cacabelos and just 2-3km before you get to Villafranca del Bierzo with lots of albregues and real hotels, so that should be no problem.
    At least the Camino / St. Jamesway / Jakobsweg is going there on side-roads, where you will hardly meet any cars or tractors.
    The best part of the Camino in this area is the path between Valtuille de Arriba and Villafranca del Bierzo, see it in all of my pics here!

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    On the Camino to Najera

    by globetrott Written Oct 22, 2012

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    Najera is quite a large town with a total of 8500 inhabitants, a lot of shops, cafes, albergues and ordinary hotels and I think it makes sense to choose this place for spending the night, when you walk the Camino ! I took the local bus from Santo Domingo de la Calzada to Najera in order to save some time and also to avoid a part of the Camino that is situated directely along main roads with a lot of trafic.
    In my main picture: a group of peregrinos leaving Najera.

    From Najera it is still 602km to Santiago de Compostela

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    take the bus to Najera

    by globetrott Written Oct 22, 2012

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    Najera is one of those places along the Camino / St. James Way / Jakobsweg, that has some very good bus-connections and all of the buses are leaving from a central place next to the river, from where you can easily reach the old part of town with the great monastery, lots of cafes, restaurants & albergues/hotels.
    AND you will find printed timetables of these buses at the station - a fact that unfortunately does not always apply to bus-stations in Spain !
    b.t.w.: Buses are really very cheap, and also quite comfortable in Spain, the only problem with them for me was the fact that in small villages you will find no signposts and no timetables for these buses, you actually have to ask the local people !

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    When you walk the Camino through Molinaseca

    by globetrott Updated Oct 21, 2012

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    Molinaseca is a place on the Camino / Jakobsweg / St. James-way that you get to, after you have crossed the last of the high passroads and the path down to Molinaseca is also quite steep and sometimes slippery and lots of accidents have happened there already, so watch your step and dont walk there without walking-sticks !!!
    Walking UP-hill was really NEVER a problem for me along the Camino, but DOWN-hill was not always easy and I was really glad to have my 2 nordic-walking-sticks with me !
    Molinaseca is a good place for shoping, it has great restaurants, cafes, albergues and hotels.
    The Camino is leading you over that old Roman bridge and then through the old part of town and after Molinaseca the path is quite flat again and easy to walk.

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    When you walk the Camino through Campo

    by globetrott Updated Sep 28, 2012

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    When you are on the Camino Campo is a tiny sidestep on your way to Ponferrada and it will cost you not more than 2 extra km maybe, BUT you will certainly enjoy it much more than walking along the main road with a lot of trafic and the sidewalk just next to the road like shown in my last picture here !
    You will not find any cafes, restaurants, albergues or hotels in Campo, but there are more than enough of them in Ponferrada !

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    walking the Camino through El Acebo

    by globetrott Written Sep 28, 2012

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    When you walk the Camino / St. Jamesway / Jakobsweg through El Acebo you will find some simple albergues as well as a very good hotel, BUT that for hotel you will need to make a reservation and this is why I had to move on to Molinaseca in order to search for a hotel.
    Walking UP-hill in that area around Cruz de Ferro and El Acebo was no problem at all, BUT hiking DOWN-hill was a problem at many places, so I think it is essential to have walking-sticks and excellent shoes (not only) there ! There is quite some slippery surface with loose rocks and stones !
    At the end of the village there is also a monument for a german cyclist, who lost his life there on the dangerous road downhill, so take your time !
    There are lots of restaurants as well in El Acebo !

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    Getting to the Camnio

    by Ribeirasacra Written Sep 21, 2012

    A car with a driver is difficult to find in Spain. They operate under the same rules as taxi companies. So take a taxi if you wish.
    I have not taken this route, but judging on the taxi fares I have recently had here in Galicia I would guess you will pay around 160€. If you have luggage, you will need a large car to fit all four and luggage in.
    The bus is the usual method of transport as there are no trains covering this route.
    All Camino information can be found out here;
    http://www.caminodesantiago.me/board

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    Walking the Camino to Manjarin

    by globetrott Updated Sep 3, 2012

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    Manjarin is a very special outpost along the Camino in a hight of 1460meters above sea-level: you are happy to have crossed the passroads and Cruz de ferro and the path goes downwards and you will come to a point in the mountains, where between lots of ruins along that road there is finally a strange combination of a house, a shop, a cafe and even a very simple albergue.
    The "kingdom of Tomas" is worth to stay for some minutes, have a look around and take some photos before you continue. The albergue has just beds for a few people, NO showers and the toilets are somewhere over the street, everything is more than simple, but certainly better than finding no bed at all...
    The distance from Manjarin to Santiago de Compostella is still 222km !

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    When you walk the Camino to Foncebadon

    by globetrott Written Aug 31, 2012

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    In the Medieval times Foncebadon used to be an important outpost along the Camino and it had its own hospital and several albergues. About 20 years ago there was not a single person living there anymore, but step by step Foncebadon is reviving and has now 2 hostals plus 1 restaurant and it might be a good place for a rest before you continue to Cruz de Ferro !
    I was lucky with the weather in the mid of May 2012, it sometimes might even snow in this part of Spain at that time of the year !
    The Camino is almost all the time on a seperate mountainpath and cars and cyclers have to use another street closeby !

    Foncebadon is 5,6km after Rabanal del Camino and
    2km before you get to Cruz de Ferro
    Till Santiago de Compostela it is still 230km to walk !

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    Hiking on the Camino to Rabanal

    by globetrott Updated Aug 30, 2012

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    Most people will come walking to this tiny village along the Camino ! The path is quite flat untill you get to Rabanal but afterwards you have to step up the mountain - hopefully in perfect weather-conditions like I had them in May 2012.
    Rabanal del Camino has a lot more cafes, restaurants and albergues to offer than most of the other small villages along the Camino and there is even an active monastery there.
    In some guidebooks you will read about wild dogs attacking the peregrinos in the area around of Rabanal, BUT, if that was ever true, it seems to be over now ! Even H.P.Kerkeling did not meet any of these dogs in 2001, although he had read some horrorstories about them in his guidebook !

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    when you walk the Camino through El Ganso

    by globetrott Updated Aug 26, 2012

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    To El Ganso the path of the Camino / St. Jamesway / Jakobsweg is almost always seperated from the ordinary road and even in these places, where you might have to walk some meters on the asphalt of the ordinary roads you will hardly every see much more than a single car or two there.
    El Ganso is in a hight of 1018m above sea-level, so you have gained some more hight since Santa Catalina de Somoza again without realizing that the path is going smoothly uphill.
    El Ganso might be a good place to stay over night, IF you are able to catch one of the 30 beds in the local albergue. They will charge you about 8 euros for the bed and the breakfast.
    I passed through this village in the morning and had just my breakfast there !

    From El Ganso it is still 256km to walk to Santiago de Compostela !

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    Walking the Camino through Sta. Catalina de Somoza

    by globetrott Updated Aug 25, 2012

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    Walking the Camino to and through Sta. Catalina de Somoza is quite easy on seperate paths that are almost totally flat although you are gently walking uphill without realizing. You will gain a hight of 100 meters very easily without noticing it. From Astorga with a hight of 881m you will walk 10km to Sta. Catalina de Somoza, that has a hight of 983m above sea-level.
    There is the hotel El Caminante, where I have stayed and another private hostal (Hospenderia San Blas) in Sta. Catalina de Somoza.

    From Sta. Catalina de Somoza it is still 260km to hike till Santiago de Compostela!

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