Santiago de Compostela Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by globetrott
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by globetrott
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by globetrott

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Santiago de Compostela

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    a pickpocket-lady??

    by globetrott Written Oct 27, 2012

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    It happened to me, while I was waiting to get inside the bus at the bus-station of Santo Domingo de la Calzada: I was the 3rd person in the line waiting to pay to the driver and to get inside the bus and all of a sudden a lady was standing besides the bus, next to the person ahead of me like she would try to skip the long line of people, who queued in order to enter the bus as well. I did not let her in and some other people behind of me did the same, but that lady stayed there at the entrance of the bus like she was trying to get into it that way.
    Then I was inside the bus and did not think of her anymore, BUT as soon as the bus-doors have closed and the bus started its tour I saw that very lady in my picture walking home like someone, who had done her job well...
    Well, maybe I am wrong, BUT what else was the sense of standing there next to the line of people, who reached for their money in order to pay the driver..??

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Women's Travel

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    Safe if you use your common sense

    by Abbeythekat Written Jul 24, 2012

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    Students in Santiago singing near the catherdral.

    One thing I like about Spain is the friendly family atmosphere that occurs after dark. I found myselt walking back to my Hotel in the evening at 11ish...and there were still lots of families out enjoying the cool air. Its just a really neat vibe. Of course I didnt venture down and dark alleys and stuck to the main paths...but I never had a problem.
    If you have finished the Camino...hang around the Square (in front of the Cathedral) in the evenings as sometimes the students from the University come down and sing and dance. Its a really cool experience. Sometimes they even ask you for a dance. There is normally a small crowd and they ask for a donation..but its worth a few Euro.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Windwheels & winds galore

    by globetrott Updated Jun 22, 2012

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    While stepping up the path to Alto de Perdon you will see lots of windwheels from the distance and the closer you get there the stronger the winds will get !
    Fix your hat with a string or you might loose it, when strong winds blow it away. I saw many baseball-caps beeing lost in the winds while walking the Camino and the best kind of hiking-hat also should cover your ears and neck !

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    • Hiking and Walking
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    • Budget Travel

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    NO hiking-shoes allowed in the Albergues

    by globetrott Written May 19, 2012

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    Hiking-shoes have to stay OUTside of your room in most of the Albergues on the Camino, in some places you even have to store your Backpacks at the reception as well - so pack accordingly and have an extra-pair of shoes ready, something like light slippers or croogs, that are also perfect for a walk in the cities !

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    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking

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    Samos monastery - physical assault by monk!

    by revjjenk Written Jan 11, 2012

    The monastery at Samos is a frequent side trip along the Camino de Santiago. If you go there, be forwarned about a VERY rude monk who "greets" visitors in the gift shop. He blatantly insulted 2 members of our group (one bec. of her blindness; the other bec. of her skin color-she is African-American). At the end of the tour, he mocked one of our group as she was stretching to relieve a back strain. Then, this monk forcefully pushed me and another member out the exit because he had another group coming in. We were trying to wait for our friend who was in the restroom and wouldn't know which way to go to the exit. He threatened to hit me, but satisfied himself with shoving me and another friend instead. I've reported his behavior to the Prior at the monastery, to the Confraternity of Saint James (in London), and to John Brierly, who writes the guidebooks for each of the Camino routes. I have had no response from the monastery. Don't go there. (same monk also refused request of woman - in another group - when she asked from a blessing & prayer, unless she paid him!) Listed below: websites for our tour co., MarlyCamino, and Confraternity of Saint James.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Women's Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    En Santiago llueve / In Santiago rains

    by elpariente Written Aug 20, 2009

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    1 more image

    No nos vamos a engañar , en Santiago llueve .
    Pero tenemos que mentalizarnos para disfrutarlo con lluvia o sin lluvia , pues si no nos quedaríamos aburridos y llenos de musgo como lo están algunos de sus edificios , aunque por ello no dejen de estar más bonitos
    Mis recomendaciones son .
    - Lleva buenos zapatos , paraguas y chubasquero
    - Pasea bajo los soportales
    - Disfruta el colorido de las calles y de los edificios cuando están húmedos
    - Quizás la más importante : Haz planes aunque haga "bueno"


    We are not cheating each other , it rains in Santiago.
    But we must make our minds to enjoy with or without rain , because if not we should be bore and full of moss as are some of their buildings, although this does not stop to make them even most beautiful
    My recommendations are.
    - Take good shoes, raincoat and umbrella
    - Walk under the arcade
    - Enjoy the colourful streets and buildings when they are wet
    - Perhaps the most important: Make plans even "if the weather is good"

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Rain

    by b1bob Updated Mar 3, 2005

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    raindrops keep falling on my head

    Early one evening, Fernando was studying at his faculty building to wait for a friend of his, also named Jesús, but a different one. Fernando went ahead of me and it was raining at a pretty good clip. I followed 30 minutes behind. I could have taken the coach or just stayed in the flat, but Fernando had made frequent reference to my age and my weight. That was effectively throwing down the gauntlet, so I was determined to meet his challenge in style. I walked for a bit over a mile in the rain, which was a downpour by then. In the old town, there were sheltered sidewalks I could duck into. However, the lion's share of the way was all wet. It took me about 45 minutes to make the trip from Fernando's flat to the university. The only time I was wetter was the previous year when Luc and I got caught in a sudden thunderstorm at King's Dominion. This is one example of how rain showers can happen with no warning at all. Don't do what I did and get caught without your umbrella. Frequent rains are why the Galician countryside is so green.

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    Cold water

    by b1bob Updated Feb 24, 2004

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    La Lanzada beach

    If you're used to the warm waters off the Outer Banks of North Carolina or tropical beaches like I am, the waters on the beaches of Sanxexo and La Lanzada will come as a cold shock. I mean, you'll wonder if the ice truck just left! The reason it is so much colder on the Atlantic side of Spain than the Mediterrean is that the Atlantic side lacks the warm current.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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  • Tami_G's Profile Photo

    Safe city

    by Tami_G Written Aug 19, 2003

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    Santiago is overall a very safe place to be in. Although it's a city, it's small and it definetly has a small town atmosphere. I have never seen myself or anyone I know in any dangerous situation and I feel really safe walking around on my own at any time of the day.

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    A little common sense goes a long way

    by b1bob Written Aug 28, 2002

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    common sense in action

    If you use common sense like wearing a neck wallet or money belt beneath your clothes, potential thieves will probably move on to an easier target. Bring traveler's cheques because they can be replaced if lost or stolen. Don't be like those hapless souls on some TV commercials.

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  • Robertorocha's Profile Photo

    No danger at all

    by Robertorocha Written Oct 23, 2011

    Santiago is a safe and nice city. During my last stay there I couldn't notice any scaring situation or naugthy people on the streets.
    Enjoy Santiago.

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Santiago de Compostela Warnings and Dangers

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