Pamplona Things to Do

  • Rejoneador Pablo Hermoso De Mendoza.
    Rejoneador Pablo Hermoso De Mendoza.
    by breughel
  • Travel in mountains of Navarre, 1917
    Travel in mountains of Navarre, 1917
    by Oleg_D.
  • Things to Do
    by Oleg_D.

Best Rated Things to Do in Pamplona

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Corridas and toreros.

    by breughel Updated Jun 15, 2010

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    The "encieros" of San Fermin i.e. the bulls running through the streets of Pampelune/Irunea constitutes an extraordinary witness of the long-lived traditions of Spain. It is always with interest and emotion that I look at them every morning at 08.00 am on the international Spanish TV between July 6th and 14th.

    For sure there are injured persons, mostly among the foreign (sometimes drunken) tourists, but it is a part of the game and it is less dangerous, for oneself and for the others, to run in front of the bulls than to drive against sense on the highway.

    But the bullfights in the after noon following the "encieros" are often mediocre. The public is that of a football match, nothing to do with the aficionados at the corridas of Las Ventas arenas in Madrid or the Maestranza in Sevilla.

    I accept bullfighting as expression of the Spanish culture and tradition but I hate bad toreros.

    This year 2010 from 7/07 till 15/07. Encieros at 08.00 h

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Toros à Pampelune/Irunea

    by breughel Updated Jun 17, 2007

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    Les "encieros" de San Fermin c'est-à-dire les la course de taureaux à travers les rues de Pampelune/Irunea constituent un témoin extraordinaire des traditions séculaires toujours vivaces de l'Espagne. C'est toujours avec plaisir et émotion que je les suis chaque matin à 08.00h. sur la TV espagnole internationale entre le 6 et 14 juillet. Bien sur il y a des blessés, le plus souvent parmi les touristes étrangers, mais cela fait partie du jeu et il est moins dangereux, pour soi-même et pour les autres, de courir devant les taureaux que de rouler à contre sens sur l'autoroute.
    Par contre ce qui est franchement médiocre ce sont les corridas de l'après midi qui suivent les encieros. Le public est celui d'un match de football, rien à voir avec les aficionados de Las Ventas ou de la Maestranza. Ce dimanche soir la TVE nous a transmis une corrida dans laquelle le second matador (je ne citerai pas son nom) a mis une douzaine de minutes et treize coups de diverses épées pour mettre à mort son taureau. Il est vrai qu'il s'agissait de toros de Miura, connus pour étant particulièrement dangereux, impressionnants de hauteur, de longueur et de poids.
    J'apprécie la tauromachie en tant qu'expression de la culture et tradition espagnole mais je déteste les médiocres toreros.

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  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    Bulls to the rear

    by DSwede Updated Feb 8, 2007

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    These guys are cute aren't they. Why do people say that they are dangerous? That's what I went to go find out over the weekend. Not much to say other than lots of people, lots of alcohol, no sleep, and a few new fuzzy friends of 2000+ pounds.

    The running in Pamplona was quite a rush, it starts at 8am, every year July 7-14, regardless of the day. If you are going to run, you have to get in the route at least an hour early. The police hold you back while they clean the street ahead, and about 30 minutes before, they release the crowd to venture as far up or down the route as they want. The entire thing is about 1/2 of a mile (800m). If you hold still long enough, the crowd will run by and then you can run along the bulls, what a rush. If you enter the arena before the last one, you can run around the field as they release smaller bulls one at a time. Each bull goes for about 10 minutes before it is tired and ushered off. The bulls themselves maybe a bit dangerous, but the crowd is the worst. They are drunk, slow, and stupid, creating more of a threat than the bulls themselves. Otherwise it is a party 24 hours a day for 7 days.

    If you do the run:
    1) Dont let the police see you with anything with a long strap, i.e. camera bag or backpack (they will detain you for safety reasons... I was pulled out and missed the run in a holding pen, only to try again the next morning)

    2) Stay on the inside of the turns... The cobblestone streets will be freshly cleaned and slippery. If a bull is to slip or take a turn wide, which will be due to hoves on slippery cobblestone.

    Bulls at sunrise before the run
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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the March of the Giants.

    by Roadquill Written Jul 25, 2005

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    During the San Fermin Festival (July 7 thru the 14) there is a parade of the giants, each representing royalty from some exotic place. They do a little dance at the bus station as well as walk around the festival. The place was packed with kids and adults, all enjoying the festivities.

    Dancing Giants at the bus station

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  • into-thin-air's Profile Photo

    " The Fuente de Vino "

    by into-thin-air Updated Nov 5, 2003

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    " The Fuente de Vino " when I saw this on the map then I thought that it HAD to be a wind up but NO there it is and the pic is here to prove it !! Not to far outside the town of Estella and right on the side of the path, So what ever you do then don't miss this Fuente !!!

    Related to:
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    Burgos

    by into-thin-air Written Nov 5, 2003

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    Burgos was the largest and most interesting city that we walked through on the first section of the Camino, we spent two nights here and were able to explore most of the sites that this Beautiful city had to offer !! The main sites are fairly central and close to the Cathedral and so makes Burgos easy for exploration on foot !! however don't forget to visit Hospital del Rey when you are walking west out of the city !!!

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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Catedral and Museum

    by Roadquill Written Aug 12, 2007

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    Just North a few blocks of the Plaza de Toros is the Pamplona Catedral and related museum. During the festivities this cathedral is all but ignored. However, it is an amazing piece of archecture dating from the 13th century and contains exquisite marble carvings of the King and Queen of Navarra from the 13th century. The museum contains an excellent ancient music section. The Priests warmly welcomed us as we visited the church. Excellent carvings and art was also in the church, including San Fermin, who the whole festival is dedicated to.

    Amazing carving of the King of Navarra - 13th cent San Fermin in the Cathedral
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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    How not to miss the running

    by Roadquill Written Nov 26, 2004

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    Obviously the running with the bulls is the main course, but I met a number of runner wannabe's who simply did not know where and when they had to be in order to participate. Even though the run starts at 8 am, you gots to get to the staging area in Plaza del Ayuntamiento no later than 7 am. Shortly after that the Polizia clear the course and are hesitant about letting in late comers. After all you didn't travel all that way to watch the bulls!

    Square where you assemble in the morning
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  • into-thin-air's Profile Photo

    Pamplona

    by into-thin-air Written Nov 5, 2003

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    The first city that we passed trough was Pamplona, a Beautiful city and I wished that we had had more time to spend here !! It is somewhere that everyone has heard of ( because of the Running of the Bulls ) but few people have probably actually visited. If you have a chance then Go because you don't know what you are missing !!!

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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    The Royal Navarrese Palace/Royal Archive

    by Oleg_D. Written Oct 27, 2013

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    Former Palace of Navarese Monarchs stands on a vantage point at the top and of early medieval borough of La Navarreira. The Palace has also other names and they are: San Pedro, Viceroy and Captaincy. Palace has been known through all its history during different periods. History of that Palace started in 1190 when Sancho VI the Wise ordered its construction. Around 1530, after conquest of this part of Navarre by the United Spain, it was inhabited by the vice-regents and since 1841 by the captain-generals. It was later the seat of the Military Government.
    Its rehabilitation and restoration as the headquarters of Royal and General Archives of Navarre was carried out by the Navarrese Architect Rafael Moneo. Since 2003 this building is the Royal Archive. That magnificent medieval building still preserves some interiors from the time of middle ages.
    Open:
    From Monday through Friday, from 08:30 till 14:30

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Parading ocal town bands

    by Roadquill Updated Jul 25, 2005

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    During the San Fermin Festival (July 7 thru the 14) many local towns arrive with their respective band, mostly of horns. They play their songs while marching through town with their local enthusiats dancing and marching with them. They play extra load whle passing a marching band from another town.

    Local town band
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  • into-thin-air's Profile Photo

    Wind Power !!

    by into-thin-air Updated Nov 5, 2003

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    When you leave Pamplona walking the Camino, the path takes you over this ridge and What a Sight !!!! The ridge is Full of Windmills, these generate Pamplona's electricity, I am Very Much in Favour of this for this form of energy and didn't find them at all visually disturbing -- What do you think ???

    Windmills on the Ridge !!
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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Monument to the Bulls

    by mikey_e Updated Jan 8, 2009

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    The running of the bulls, or Los San Fermines, is by far the most famous event to take place in Pamplona. It shouldn’t surprise you, then, that the festival is held in pretty high esteem in this city, or that there is a massive monument to it in the city centre. Actually, this is the Segundo Ensanche, so you know that the statue is a fairly recent innovation. Still, it is pretty impressive to be walking along what should be a pretty banal shopping street, only to be faced with a dozen or so charging (metal) bulls and the brave souls who jump in their path. This is a great place for photos, especially if you have someone to take your picture on the statue (or of whom you can take a picture).

    Monument to the bulls Details of the bulls Watch out!
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  • Oleg_D.'s Profile Photo

    Church of Saint Nicholas

    by Oleg_D. Updated Oct 24, 2013

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    Iglesia San Nicolas or Church of Saint Nicholas was built in XII century. It acted as the perish church and fortress to defend the population of Borough of San Nicolas. People from that Borough were involved in endless disputes and skirmishes with the other two boroughs of the city of Pamplona (Navarrería and San Saturnino). In 1222, during one of these attacks a fire burned the old Romanesque church-fortress to the ground, so it was necessary to build a new one, which was consecrated in 1231. That’s why this church had the very thick castle like walls, towers and other military defensive elements. Unfortunately majority of these elements disappeared in 1512 after the conquest of this part Navarre by the united Spain (Castile and Leon and Aragon). Church has the Latin cross floor plan and three naves. One crucifix and several stain glass windows survived from XIV century.
    I highly recommend visiting that monument of Navarese ecclesiastic and architectural culture.
    Admission is free but any donations are welcomed and highly appreciated. Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash light and tripod.
    Open:
    Monday - Saturday
    09:30-12:30 and 18:00-20:30
    Sunday and Fest days
    09:30-13:30 and 19:00-20:30

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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  • morganna's Profile Photo

    Navarra Museum

    by morganna Updated May 3, 2003

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    The stuff exhibited shows Navarra's heritage from prehistory to present times.

    I recommend specially the romanesque works, there are some exquisite chapitels from different masters. An absolute must if u love medieval art!

    Navarra Museum gate
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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Pamplona Things to Do

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