Fun things to do in Spain

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Spain

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    A BIT ABOUT CASARABONELA

    by LoriPori Written Mar 9, 2014

    Thursday, February 13, 2014
    Situated 48 km from Malaga in the northwestern part of the Guadalhorce Valley region, the village of CASARABONELA is 500 metres above sea level and has a population of approximately 3,000.
    The surrounding terrain is dotted with olive groves and formed terraces that yield fruits and vegetables.
    In Roman days Casarabonela was known as Castra Vinaria - Wine Castle. The winding streets in the village retain its Arabic form (pic #1)
    Of interest to see is the Church of Santiago and the Shrine to the Vera Cruz ( True Cross).
    Access routes to Casarabonela from the Costa del Sol is by the A-357 from Malaga to Ardales. From Ardales take the MA-446 and after about 12 km turn onto MA-445 which leads to Casarabonela.
    We spent the day with Henning driving in the mountains and the Guadalhorce Valley. We had coffees in a little town called Pizzara where it was market day. We had a lunch Menu at Meson La Parada (pic # 4)..
    We had a lovely sunny day and I enjoyed seeing olive trees and the almond trees were in bloss

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    Tapas...please don't assume you can eat for free.

    by leics Updated Feb 28, 2014

    There seems to be a bit of a myth about tapas...that you can eat loads for nothing more than the price of a drink.

    I've not been to many Spanish destinations but I can tell you for 100% certain that this *is* a total and absolute myth.

    What tapas you get, and whether or not you have to pay for it, depends entirely on the individual bar/cafe. Some will give you nothing with your drink, some will just give you a few olives or nuts, some will offer you a choice of a few 'free' tapas (and sometimes the price of the drink is a bit higher, so they aren't really 'free' at all), some places have no free tapas at all but offer you a list of reasonably-priced options,l some have a more extensive and much more expensive list of tapas dishes.

    It really does vary massively. Every place I have visited so far in Spain has operated a different policy. In my (admittedly limited) experience you are far more likely to get good 'free' tapas if you visit places which are used by locals than if you visit places which are mainly or exclusively used by visitors..and certainly those places which are close to popular sights or sites.

    If you don't eat much (like me) then you may be able to make a lunch out of the 'free' tapas you get with a couple of beers, but even I couldn't make a 'free' evening meal without drinking far more than I would want to! :-)

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    the aqueduct

    by gwened Updated Feb 3, 2014

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    a masterpiece of Roman engineering and still looks wonderful, a must to visit while in this beautiful city.
    read more at VT destination Segovia or the tourist office of Segovia
    http://www.turismodesegovia.com/

    below I have the Unesco webpage on the aqueduct. I lived in Madrid for several years and came here often, even later visited with the family,the latest are photos from the times. its a must even if just coming for Madrid to stop by here.

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    The Prado

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 26, 2013

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    This is Spain's piece de resistance when it comes to galleries. On a world scale it often rates in the top three (depending on what you want to see).
    It has what many experts regard as the greatest painting (Las Meninas by Velazquez).
    It definitely has the greatest collection of Spanish painters. Examples of Goya, El Greco and Velazquez abound - we're talking rooms full of each here.
    If you're looking for other artists you're sure to find a Tintorello, Murillo, Ribera, Rubens, Rembrandt, Rafael, Botticelli, Martinez ded Mazo, Van der Hamen or, my all time favourite still life artist, Melendez, somewhere in the gallery.
    If you get a guide you'll learn about the three main periods of Goya, especially when he got depressed because of his deafness later in life and painted sombre works at his residence which have been lifted off the walls and transerred to the Prado; you'll learn that Velazquez liked to paint himself into his pictures and how El Greco (the Greek) came to Spain.
    Opened in 1819 it also has an annexe with 19th and 20th century sculptures and paintings.
    The picture is one of Velazquez' most famous and, at the extreme right, you can see Velazquez himself as he often included himself in his work.
    Another painter I'd never heard of that blew me away was Luis Melendez. Unheralded in his time, he is regarded as the greatest still life painter of the 18th century. I'm not a big fan of the genre but Melendez' work is superb beyond any other I've seen.
    If you're into art, you'll be going there anyway; if you're not, try it, you might like it!

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    Dali Museum

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 26, 2013

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    If you like art or just the bizarre, the Dali Museum will not disappoint. If you think what you have already seen of Dali is different, then take a few steps further into the unknown. His President Lincoln/nude and the Mae West room will, I guarantee, tantalize you. His range of works and his imagination are beyond anything I've previously seen.
    The opening picture is the 'thing' you are confronted with when you walk in. I don't know how else to describe it, but there's a rainforest inside the Cadillac.
    Dali was adept at other skills as well and his work with jewellery is also a highlight in the museum.
    Dali was also an avid collector of his favourite artists, one of whom is my favourite, Gerrit Dou, a Dutch painter whose work is meticulously fine.
    Another piece that gets a lot of attention is the painting of Abe Lincoln that is also a naked woman; just depends on how you look at it.
    The last time I visited, 2012, it was crowded, you have been warned.

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    Murcia

    by solopes Updated Dec 15, 2013

    No, Murcia is not only a fabulous cathedral - Murcia is a beautiful city that only in the third time passing there I had time to visit.

    And to enjoy.

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    Mijas

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Mijas is a small Mountain town in the Costa Del Sol area. It's known for its Donkey rides and also for a virgin Mary Statue purported to be from the 800's. Per the legend it was hidden from the Moors and finally rediscovered about 100 years ago.

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    Granada

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Granada is the last Moorish kingdom reconquered by the Christians. As such it maintains much of its Moorish Architecture. This Includes one of Spain's greatest sights, the Alhambra, the Moorish Castle.

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    Cordoba

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Cordoba is known for its excellently preserved Moorish Architecture. The town dates back to Roman times. The highlight of the town is the Mesquite (Mosque), a former Moorish mosque on such a grand scale that rather than convert it to a Cathedral the christian conquerors simply built a cathedral within the Mosque.

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    Toledo

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Toledo is the mediavel capital of Spain. It's a great city to visit for Spanish medieval architecture as it become a backwater once the capital moved to Madrid. This had the effect of preserving most of Toledo in its original state.

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    Madrid

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Madrid is Spain's vibrant modern political and cultural capital. It's also known as the city of fountains for its great collecion of these monuments. Madrid is also a fantastic place for nightlife, like most of Spain the dinner hour doesn't start till 10 PM or later and goes into the wee hours of the night.

    Someone tell me, when do these people sleep?

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    museu Dali Figueres

    by gwened Updated Nov 23, 2013

    a wonderful place to hold the expressive talent of a Genius.
    from the webpage you have full description ,and hours, prices, etc
    i give you the essential background info
    Inaugurated in 1974, the Dalí Theatre-Museum was built upon the remains of the former Figueres theatre. It contains the broadest range of works spanning the artistic career of Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), from his earliest artistic experiences and his surrealist creations down to the works of the last years of his life.
    Some of the most outstanding works on exhibition there are: Port Alguer (1924), The Girl from Figueres (1926), The Spectre of Sex Appeal (1932), Soft Self-Portrait with Fried Bacon (1941), Poetry of America – The Cosmic Athletes (1943), Galarina (1944-45), Basket of Bread (1945), Napoleon’s Nose Transformed into a Pregnant Woman Strolling Her Shadow with Melancholic amongst Original Ruins (1945), Atomic Leda (1949), Apotheosis of the Dollar (1965), Galatea of the Spheres (1952) and Dawn, Noon, Afternoon and Evening (1979).

    Since the death of Salvador Dalí, in 1989, one can also visit the crypt with his grave, situated in the centre of the museum

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    Sagrada Familia Barcelona

    by gwened Written Nov 23, 2013

    The main symbol of the city to me. The one thing Worth going to see there if no time for anything else.

    This is not done, but work continue
    The expiatory church of La Sagrada Família was begun on 19 March 1882 from a project by the diocesan architect Francisco de Paula del Villar (1828-1901). At the end of 1883 Gaudí was commissioned to carry on the works, a task which he did not abandon until his death in 1926.
    It is said that when the church is finished it will have 18 towers: 12 dedicated to the apostles, 4 to the evangelists, one to Jesus and another to Mary.

    opening time are October to March, 9h to 18h, and April to September, 9h to 20h
    25 and 26 December – 1 and 6 January, 9h to 14h
    Audioguides are available in Catalan, Spanish, English, French, Italian, Russian, Portuguese, German and Chinese.

    Towers are open from 9h to 30 minutes before the church closes (Passion lift)
    From 9h to 15 minutes before the church closes (Nativity lift)

    the admission on the basilica goes from 14€ to 19.80€ and the individual entrances are by Carrer Sardenya (sardenya street)

    The Sagrada Familia or Holy family consists of five main naves and three cross-cutting that form a Latin cross. The five main ships have a length of 90 meters and the cross-cutting of 60 meters.

    The themes of the three façades are: the birth of Christ, the passion of Christ, and the glory. The first façade described by many ornamental details the birth of Christ. The facade of the passion seems simple and new although it contains less details, but larger statues. The facade of the glory will be the main facade even though construction has not been completed.

    When construction is finished, it will have 18 towers between 90 to 170 meters. These towers are dedicated to the Apostles, evangelists, Mary and Jesus Christ. The 170-metre Tower is expected to be the highest Tower in the world at a church.

    It is expected also that the Sagrada Familia finished built in the year 2025, be exclusively funded with donations and proceeds from entries.

    SEE IT!!!

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    San Lorenzo de El Escorial

    by gwened Written Nov 4, 2013

    This is a sumptuous monument not to be missed, its the neocropolis of most of the Kings/Queens of Spain, and built by order of Felipe II.
    It is located in the locality of San Lorenzo near Madrid and with direct public transport access as well as car which how I always reach it. Even had a flat tire there once lol!

    It is open October to March from 10h to 18h. April to September from 10h to 19h
    bus terminal in town is at Calle Juan de Toledo, 3 coming from Madrid by Autobuses Herranz.

    This building, one of the main Renaissance monuments of Spain, was erected in the last third of the 16th century, on the slope of Monte Abantos, 1,028 m above sea level. It is an original project of Juan Bautista de Toledo, which was completed after his death, by Juan de Herrera, who imposed a new architectural style, named after its last name. It occupies an area of 33.327 m² and featuring 16 courtyards, 88 fountains, 13 oratories, 15 Cloisters, 86 staircases, 9 towers, 1,200 doors and 2,673 windows. Its main facade has a length of 207 meters. Among the most outstanding parts of the building, are the Pantheon of Kings, the Royal Basilica and the Royal Library. Since the 16th century, the monastery of el Escorial has been described as the eighth wonder of the world INDEED!

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    Catedral de Segovia

    by gwened Written Nov 4, 2013

    One of the jewels of Spain and one of my favorites. Link not only to Spain but the history of the Americas, which the Queen Isabel I the Catholic was crowned first here queen of Castile.

    a bit of history

    The main square is framed by beautiful pinnacles of the apse of the Cathedral, afternoon meeting point of storks. Late Gothic style, began to be built in 1525 It replaced the old cathedral located in the current gardens of the Alcázar and destroyed during the Guerra of the communities in 1520.

    On the outside, to the West, is the main façade, known as Puerta del Perdón, with the sculpture of the Virgin, work of Juan Guas.

    Next to it lies the stone floors, a space that is currently used for cultural activities. The Tower, located on the side of the epistle, is one of the most striking by its high altitude and has been inhabited until the middle of the 20th century by the ringer. It constitutes a privileged viewpoint over the city, although it is only possible to access it with a special permission.

    South opens the door of San Geroteo, first bishop of Segovia and, to the North, San Frutos door, built in honor of the patron saint of the city at the beginning of the 17C. Another focus of interest is the apse, which adjoins the old Jewish quarter, seasoned by buttresses and pinnacles of florid Gothic, of limestone, surrounding the great dome.

    The plant is three naves with transept, with a semicircular apse in the header and ambulatory, surrounded by chapels. The grandeur and harmony of dimensions define the interior. Leisurely observation deserve the stained-glass windows ( 16C), the altarpiece dedicated to Ntra. Ms. Paz (14C), donated to the city by Enrique IV, the choir stalls (end of 15C) from the old cathedral, the beautiful baroque organs, the railings or neoclassical jubé which keeps the urn with the relics of San Frutos.

    It houses 18 chapels located in the ambulatory and in the aisles, with important paintings and sculptures. Inside are the Romanesque Calvary located at the entrance of the chapel of the sacrament; the triptych by Ambrosius Benson and the altarpiece of mercy, by Juan de Juni, in the chapel of the Holy burial, alongside San Frutos door; and the recumbent Christ by Gregorio Fernández.

    A cloister of Juan Guas coming from the old cathedral, Romanesque and moved stone by stone to its current location, precedes the rooms of the Cathedral Museum. The Cathedral archive preserves more than 500 incunabula, among them the Sinodal de Aguilafuente, first book printed in Spain.

    Like I said a must to see. Open October to march from 9h30 - 17h30; April to September from 9h30 - 18h30. Admission is 3 € Sundays is free from 9h30 to 13h15

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