Djurgårdsbrunn Things to Do

  • Kirugfiskar at the Skansen Akvariet
    Kirugfiskar at the Skansen Akvariet
    by sim1
  • Etnografiska museet
    Etnografiska museet
    by sim1
  • Etnografiska museet
    Etnografiska museet
    by sim1

Most Recent Things to Do in Djurgårdsbrunn

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    The Vasa Museum

    by sim1 Updated Oct 26, 2013

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    The Vasa Museum


    I think I have to start this page with the most famous of the museums in Stockholm: The Vasa Museum. It is a real must see! And it is no wonder that it is Scandinavia's most visited museum.

    In the museum you can see the large warship Vasa. It is the only remaining and intact 17th century ship in the world. The wreck was salvaged in 1961 and now on display In the Vasa Museum. The ship is really impressive and you are able to walk around the ship so you can get a real good look at it. The lower rig has been rebuilt, complete with masts, stays and shrouds, making it a complete ship again. Surrounding the ship are several permanent exhibitions, cinemas, a shop and a restaurant.

    opening hours: (2013)
    Jun - Aug: daily 8:30 to 18:00
    Sep - May: 10:00 - 17:00; Wednesdays 10:00 to 20:00
    Closed: December 23-25 and 1st January. Limited opening hours on December 31 (10:00 - 15:00)

    Admission:
    Adults 130 SEK (on Wednesdays 1st Sep- 31st May 17:00 - 20:00 only 100 SEK-
    Students 100 SEK, Children, 0-18 yrs free

    Getting here:
    Take a walk, bus or ferry to the island of Djurg˚rden. Buses 47 and 69 leave from the Central Station. Bus 44 from Karlaplan. The ferry leaves from Slussen all year round and also from Nybroplan during the summer.

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    Gröna Lund

    by sim1 Updated Jun 21, 2007

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    Gr��na Lund
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    If you are looking for an amusement park, Gröna Lund on Djurgården is THE place to be! You can find here all traditional rides, where you'll be shaken around in all ways imaginable, from up side down, left to right and of course flying high up into the air and fall even quicker down again. With two rollercoaster and a staggering high free-fall attraction, Gröna Lund should satisfy the thrill-seeker in you. I didn't dare to get any closer yet then to look at it from the waterfront, hahaha, which was more then close enough for me ;-) But I am sure that for the ones that like amusement parks Gröna Lund must be fun.

    I can only imagine how the views from the rollercoaster at Gröna Lund must be: High up in the sky the view over the waters of Stockholm and the surrounding city should be wonderful.... IF you have time AND you dare to look at it of course, while racing up and down that rollercoaster ;-) In the photo you can see some views of Gröna Lund from the water.

    Here is a link to the Opening hours of Gröna Lund.

    Entrance fee: adults 60 SEK, Children 4 - 12 year: 30 SEK. Free entrance for children from 0 - 3 years and for pensioners (65+). In addition to the entrance fee you need to pay for the separate attractions. A ride will cost you 1 to 3 coupons, costing 20 SEK each. 20 coupons are 300 SEK. If you want to have a whole day fun without worrying about the number of rides an all day bracelet to the attractions costs 260 SEK, and evenings only 190 SEK.

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    Gröna Lund

    by sim1 Updated Jun 9, 2007

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    Gr��na Lund
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    If you are looking for an amusement park, Gröna Lund on Djurgården is THE place to be! You can find here all traditional rides, where you'll be shaken around in all ways imaginable, from up side down, left to right and of course flying high up into the air and fall even quicker down again. With two rollercoaster and a staggering high free-fall attraction, Gröna Lund should satisfy the thrill-seeker in you. I didn't dare to get any closer to Gröna Lund then to look at it from the waterfront, hahaha, which was more then close enough for me ;-) But I am sure that for the ones that like amusement parks Gröna Lund must be fun.

    I can only imagine how the views from the rollercoaster at Gröna Lund must be: High up in the sky the view over the waters of Stockholm and the surrounding city should be wonderful.... IF you have time AND you dare to look at it of course, while racing up and down that rollercoaster ;-) In the photo you can see some views of Gröna Lund from the water.

    Here is a link to the Opening hours of Gröna Lund.

    Entrance fee: adults 60 SEK, Children 4 - 12 year: 30 SEK. Free entrance for children from 0 - 3 years and for pensioners (65+). In addition to the entrance fee you need to pay for the separate attractions. A ride will cost you 1 to 3 coupons, costing 20 SEK each. 20 coupons are 300 SEK. If you want to have a whole day fun without worrying about the number of rides an all day bracelet to the attractions costs 260 SEK, and evenings only 190 SEK.

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    Nordiska Museet

    by sim1 Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Nordiska Museet
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    In the Nordiska Museet, which is located opposite the Vasa Museum) you can discover the history of the Swedish people. I haven't come any further yet then the outside of the museum, but the building itself is already quite impressive. Inside you can see traditions, fashions, table settings, furnished interiors, paintings by Strindbert and much more! And everything for free!! Certainly a reason for me to visit Stockholm again and this time not only look at the museum on the outside but explore the inside as well :-)

    Opening hours
    Monday-friday 10-16
    Saturday-sunday 11-17

    Entrance fee
    Free admission to the museum except to the Childrens Playroom during weekends and to certain events.

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    • Historical Travel
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    Kaknästurnet

    by sim1 Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Kakn��sturnet
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    The last tip is certainly not the most beautiful one to look at: the Kaknästurnet (Kaknäs tower). The Kaknäs Tower is the hub of all TV and radio transmission in Sweden. And although ugly to look at it is said that you have some wonderful views from this 155-metre high tower over the whole of Stockholm. The tower doesn't only have a viewing gallery, but also a restaurant and café. I've never been up here myself, but I do hope to do so some nice sunny day to enjoy the undoubtedly wonderful views from here.

    Opening hours:
    January: Mon-Wed 10-17, Thu-Sat 10-21, Sun 10-17.
    May-Aug: Mon-Sun 9-22
    Sep-Apr: Mon-Sun 10-21
    Closed: 1.1, 24-25.12

    Entrance fee:
    Adult SEK 30
    Child 7-15 years SEK 15
    Free admission with the Stockholm Card

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    Totem pole of the Haisla Indians, Canada

    by sim1 Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Totem pole of the Haisla Indian in Canada


    The last thing about the Etnografiska Museet I would like to show you is this totem pole of the Haisla Indians in Canada. But if you want to see this totem pole in the museum you do have to hurry! After long talks and renewed interests in the totem pole by the Haisla Indians, the totem pole will now return to where it belongs, in British Columbia, Canada. In return the museum will get a newly carved copy of the totem pole by the Haisla Indians.

    The nine-metre, red cedar wood pole was donated to the Museum of Ethnography in 1929 by Sweden's then vice consul to British Columbia, Olof Hansson. In the photo you can see the bottom part of the totem pole, which is one of the three figures on the pole, and it represents a mythical grizzly bear living under water.

    You can read much more about the "The Haisla Totem Pole Repatriation project" on this website: http://www.haislatotem.org/index.html

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    Etnografiska museet

    by sim1 Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Brass rooster, 18th century
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    Another part of the Etnografiska museet that cought my interest was the exhibition about Benin. The museum has a large collection about Benin and the major part of this collection has been donated by professor Hans Meyer (1858-1929) from Germany.

    The Republic of Benin is a country in West Africa, formerly known as Dahomey or Dahomania. By the 17th century, the kingdom, ruled by an oba, stretched beyond the borders of present-day Benin, covering a large part of West-Africa. The kingdom was prosperous and established slave trading relations with the Europeans (mostly Portuguese and Dutch) who first arrived in the late 15th century.

    In the photos you can see some of the many objects displayed at the museum:

    Photo 1
    Brass roosters are placed on ancestral altars commemorating the Queen Mothers of Benin. The rooster is in court circles considered a symbol for the senior wife of the Oba. 18th century.

    Photo 2
    Relief plaque depicting three Europeans. This is possible a Portugese merchant seated on an armchair with a herald and an escort soldier on either side. Mid 16th century.

    Photo 3
    Palace guard equiped with a shield, keeping watch over the main entrance to the royal palace. Early 17th century.

    Photo 4
    Palace plaque with full-length portraits of three men, two of them in chiefly attire with ceremonial swords in their hands, and the third one smaller, naked, holding a fan. 19th century.

    Photo 5
    Hip ornament displaying a human face, generally worn by chiefs at their left hip, covering the closure of their wrapped skirts. Late 19th century. The photo that you can see on the intro of this page is a similar type of hip ornament.

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    Etnografiska museet

    by sim1 Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Etnografiska museet
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    The Etnografiska museet has an extensive collection av the native population of North-, Middle and Southern America and even of Greenland. And part of this collection is about the Teotihuacán and I really enjoyed this part of the museum. So that's why I posted a few of the photos I took there.

    "Teotihuacán" (teh-oh-tee-wah-kahn) is a Nahuatl name, traditionally translated as "city of the gods," but also translated as "city where the men became as gods." According to legend it was where the Gods gathered to plan the creation of man. Construction of Teotihuacán started around 300 BC, with the Pyramid of the Sun built by 150 BC.

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    Etnografiska museet

    by sim1 Updated Feb 5, 2006

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    Etnografiska museet
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    The Etnografiska museet (Museum of Ethnography) is located next to the Tekniska Museet (Museum of Science and Technology) and the Sjöhistoriska museet (National Maritime Museum). This museum seems to be the smallest of the three, but there is enough to see here to keep you busy for at least an hour or probably much more. The museum has collections from Asia, Africa, Australia, Oceania, America, and Greenland. What you will find here is lots about the folklore, beliefs and practices of different cultures around the world. Most of the objects in the museum date back to the 19th and 20th century and the focus is mainly on Africa and the original inhabitants of North America (during my visit).

    I have to admit that I have a bit of a mixed feeling about this museum. I think the part that bothered me the most was the lack of light in the museum. Some areas were so dark that it was hard to see the objects that were on display, let alone to read the signs beside them telling what it was about. I also lost the 'logic' in the museum from time to time, being among the indians one minute and only a few metres on I was back in Africa, loosing the sense what the chronicle order and relevance between the displays was. BUT at the same time I have to admit that there were some really nice parts of the museum that I enjoyed very much! I think the part that I liked most were a little corner about Teotihuacán and the more extensive exposition about Benin. I'll show a bit more about these in the next tips.

    A nice thing about the museum is that they have their own restaurant focussing on food of diiferent cultures around the world. I'll tell you a bit more about that in my restaurant tip.

    Opening hours
    Daily 10am - 5pm and on Wednesdays from 10am - 8pm.

    Admission to the museum is for free!

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    The slithering one.....

    by sim1 Written Feb 4, 2006

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    The slithering one.....
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    The slithering one.....
    Okay, let me introduce you to some of the 'cute' animals of the Skansen Aquarium. Some are a bit creepy though, hahaha, as this one from the snake collection. They are behind glass though, so not really something to worry about. Although.... I was here in the morning hours during a weekday in the winter, no one else to see around, hahaha, and I have to admit that felt a tiny bit creepy, lol.

    If you are feeling courageous you might consider petting a giant spider or hugging one of the snakes! During high season they make it possible for you to pet and hug several animals.

    Photo 2:
    Puh.... Let me sit in my sunshine..... ;-))
    Some animals at the Skansen Aquarium were quite a character, like this 'up nosed' turtle in the second picture for example. Hahaha, it clearly felt itself too good for us, lol :-) It didn't give us one single look! And I could clearly hear it think.... Puh.... Let me sit in my sunshine..... ;-))

    Photo 3:
    I am soooo sleepy ;-)
    A shy, but oh so cute, character! Hihihi, doesn't it look cute!!! And it looked soooo sleepy! It was sitting high up in a tree, and looking sleepy down to us from its fortress. Ooooh, it just melted my heart, sooo terribly cute!

    This is the Grey Gentle Lemur, a seriously threatened species due to habitat destruction. It is one of the few animals that can feed on bamboo. Fig tree leaves, grass and different fruits will also do. Hahaha, but I felt that all it wasn't that interested in eating right now, all it wanted to do was getting a bit of sleep ;-)

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    Skansen

    by sim1 Updated Feb 4, 2006

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    Skansen


    I've only been to Skansen in the wintertime and this isn't the best time to be here. During summer the place comes alive, all kinds of events are going on, and it must be fun to walk around here in the summertime. In the winter it is very quiet and not much to do, so I can't really recommend in going here during that time of year, with the exception for the Skansen Aquarium, which is great. (see my next tip).

    Skansen is an open-air museum with 150 historical buildings, handicraft, zoo, aquaria, etc. The open-air museum was founded in 1891 by Arthur Hazelius (1833-1901) for the purpose of showing how people had lived and worked in different parts of Sweden in times gone by. Over the years about 150 historic buildings have been moved here from nearly every part of Sweden. Most of them date from the 18th and 19th centuries. Visitors to the houses and farmsteads are met by hosts and hostesses in period costume. They often demonstrate domestic occupations, such as weaving and spinning.

    Besides an open-air museum, Skansen is also a zoo, actually the world oldest, showing the typical Nordic animals like moose, reindeer, lynx, wolf, etc.

    Opening hours: May 10 - 20, Jun - Aug 10 - 22, Sep 10 - 17, Oct - Apr 10 - 16. Historical building are open May - Sep 11 - 17, but only some buildings Oct - Apr 11 - 15.

    Entrance fee: During the summer : Adults 80 SEK, 6 - 15 years 30 SEK. The entrance fee might differ, lower off season and higher on special days like midsummer and Swedish National day. There is an additional entrance fee for special exhibits like the aquarium. Free entrance with Stockholm Card.

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    Why did the Vasa sink?

    by sim1 Updated Feb 4, 2006

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    The Vasa Museum



    When the Vasa set sail in 1628 she was one of the mightiest warship in the world. With 64 guns and 300 soldiers she was to put fear in the hearts of the enemy. But it never got that far, the ship sank after just a few minutes of sailing. So why did a brand-new and mighty ship like this sink so quickly? Nowadays it might sound such an illogical to happen. But In the 17th century there were no scientific methods of calculating a ship's stability. It was not uncommon that warships heeled over and sank. The Vasa was too heavy on top, with all the guns, masts and sails, and there was too little ballast in the bottom to keep the ship stable.

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    The woodcarvings of the Vasa

    by sim1 Updated Feb 4, 2006

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    Vasa Museum


    The part of the ship that I really enjoyed was watching the woodcarvings. There are around 700 sculptures and ornaments that decorate the warship. This is a huge woodcarving on the back of the ship. But you can find woodcarvings on all parts of the ship, like in the previous picture, where you can see a lions head on the gun port.

    The woodcarvers who made the sculptures were not Swedish but came from Holland and Germany. They carved in oak, pine and lime, in the style of the late Renaissance and early Baroque. The motifs were taken from Greek mythology, the Bible, Roman history and in the contemporary, idealistic ideas of Swedish history.

    There are walkways around the ship on several levels, so you can have a great view of the ship from top to bottom.

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    Skansen akvariet (Skansen Aquarium)

    by sim1 Written Feb 4, 2006

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    Kirugfiskar at the Skansen Akvariet
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    When you are at Skansen, you must consider visiting the Skansen Akvariet (Skansen Aquarium) as well. You have to pay an extra entrance fee in addition to the entrance to Skansen, but I think it is worth it, as it is a little but very nice aquarium. You can see all kinds of exotic animals here, like flesh-eating piranha, crocodiles, spiders, snakes, bats, fishes, monkeys and many other breeds. It really is a small but fun little zoo where you can see all kinds of small animals from creepy to cute.

    Entrance fee: Adults 65 SEK, 6 - 15 years 35 SEK, 0 - 5 years free. (NB: you have to pay entrance to Skansen open air museum as well, see previous tip)

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    Sjöhistoriska Museet & Tekniska Museet

    by sim1 Updated Feb 4, 2006

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    Sj��historiska Museet


    This tip is under construction. This tip is going to be about the Sjöhistoriska Museet & Tekniska Museet. I'll try to add more info to this tip as soon as I can.

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