Drottningholm Things to Do

  • King Adolf Fredrik's lathe workshop
    King Adolf Fredrik's lathe workshop
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    The Theatre
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Most Recent Things to Do in Drottningholm

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    Changing of the guards

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Guard at Drottningholm


    When you are at Drottningholm at noon don't forget to take a look at the changing of the guards! The main "Changing of the Guards" takes place at the Royal Palace in the heart of Stockholm, but Drottningholm also has its own, although this is a much shorter ceremony. The event takes place at 12 o'clock and takes about 10 minutes.

    I didn't wait to watch it myself as a guided tour of the palace started at 12 as well (bad timing in my opinion to let the two start at the same time). I watched the changing of the guards in the city centre quite a few times and it is fun to see. Unlike in some other countries the guards are allowed to move, smile and talk to the general public. Maybe surprising to some, but it is also normal to have woman standing guard. Quite refreshing in my opinion :-)

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    The Billiard Room

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    King Adolf Fredrik's lathe workshop


    The last room I would like to show you a bit of is the Billiard Room at Kina Slott. Like the Confidence, this is also a seperate building. The billiard room is similar in style as the main building and was completed at the end of the the 1760's. This room was originally used for playing billiards.

    Nowadays the room gives an impression of how the workshop of King Adolf Fredrik used to look like. Not so impressive to see maybe, but I found it quite interesting to learn that in the eighteenth century, turning on a lathe was a recreation for the royals and the nobility of Europe. And not only Kings would do some handywork, even the Queen used to work on the lathe! In this room you can see tools and a carpenters bench used in those days.

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    The Confidence

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    Taking a look inside the Confidence.
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    Kina Slott consists of more then one building, actually there are quite a few of them. Of course you have to visit the main building, which is by far the most impressive, but you shouldn't forget to take a quick peek inside the Confidence as well.

    The Confidence is a dining room, but not your usual one! The Royal Family could use this private dining room if they wanted to take their meals privately "en confidence" without any servants present. To be able to do this the Confidence was build with a clever mechanism. An ingenious system made it possible to lift a ready-laid table up through the dining rooms floor. Beside the main dining table ther are also four side tables, having a similar lifting system. If you enlarge the photo, you might see a bit how the system works. When the Royal Family was ready to dine, all they needed to do was to pull a handle in the dining room. A bell would ring in the serving region below and the lifting system would bring in the food.

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    Inside Kina Slott

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    Inside Kina Slott / Chinese Pavilion


    I wish I could show you a bit more of the interior of the Kina Slott, but unfortunately photography is forbidden inside. The only photo I have is of this Chinese lacquer-panel. And unlike what this particular photo might suggest, the Kina Slott is a very colourful place. I was amazed by the abundance of colours and how they in a remarkable way blended so well with each other. I remember for example a total pink room, quite amazing to see! They were certainly not shy of colours!! Bright yellow, orange and greens come to my mind when thinking back to my visit here, living brightly next to each other, and visible when looking from one room to the next.

    I know it sounds strange that a bright coloured interior can work so well together, but it does! The light flowing through the big windows all eases it down a bit and gives a feeling of a wonderful summers day inside the pavilion. The walls are covered with Chinese decorations and quite a few objects are on display in the various rooms. What can I say more? When you are in the area, just don't forget to visit Kina Slott! And I hope you'll like it as much as I did :-)

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    Decorations

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    Everywhere you look on the outside of the buildings at Kina Slott, and even more so on the inside, you will see Chinoiserie. In the photos you can see a few examples of decorations that ornate the outside of the palace. Chinoiserie was very popular in the middle of the 18th century and can be described as an artistic style dominated by Chinese influence. It is characterized through the use of elaborate decoration and intricate patterns. Chinoiserie symbols the way the people thought how China was like in those days. The most popular themes in the Chinoiserie were images of a fairyland, lots of dragons and phoenixes, mandarins surrounded by mountainous landscapes, bridges, flower parasols, bamboo pavilions and monkeys swinging around. A strange and imaginative world, which is still fascinating to see in this time and age. At Kina Slott the Chinoiserie is heavily mixed in with the Rococo style.

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    More about Kina Slott

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    View from the main building, second floor
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    So who wouldn't like to get a small palace as a present? In this case Queen Lovisa Ulrika did on her birthday in the year 1753. Kina Slott was given to her by her husband King Adolf Fredrik as a surprise gift. Chinoiserie was the height of fashion in those days and thus the present was highly appreciated.

    The original wooden building didn't last so long though, and it was replaced only 10 years later by the current "Kina Slott", which is bigger then the original, but maybe more important at the time: it became a more permanent structure. Nowadays Kina Slott has one of the finest European rococo interiors with chinoiserie. It really is a fascinating place to walk around in, see the magnificent colours of the interior and the way how "China" was considered to be in those days.

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    The gardens

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    Drottningholm
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    From the windows at the top of the stairs you have a good view over the formal gardens of Drottningholm (second photo). The view over the garden is actually the only place where you are allowed to take photos inside Drottningholm. These formal gardens are the oldest in the series of three garden styles at the palace. They date back to the 17th century and were laid out here by Queen Hedvig Eleonora (who also had the palace built).This formal garden is called the Baroque Garden and is directly adjoined to the Palace. The garden has very strict lines, dominated by box-hedges and stripes of crushed brick of black granite. It is divided into four different section, but they all have the same formal and strict feel to it. There is no flower in sight though! Just lawns, hedges, statues, some fountains and 'manicured' trees. For me these gardens were a huge disappointment as I had hoped for so much more. The cold 'feel' of this particular garden and the lack of a real 'highlight' is just didn't appeal to me.

    Beside the formal garden there are two more gardens, which in my opinion are a bit more attractive. The one surrounding the Chinese Pavilion is from the mid 18th century and it is a blend between the strict ideal garden design and a more natural kind of park. The third is a real English natural landscape garden.

    As you can see the garden really disappointed me, partly due to my high expectations and memories of the formal gardens at Versailles (which I loved). The good news though is that the gardens are for free! And the English garden seems perfect for a nice stroll and as a picnic spot! There are two ponds located in this garden and some beautiful big lawns. Unfortunately I didn't have my picnic basket with me, otherwise I would have tried it out for you ;-)

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    Some of the collections

    by sim1 Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    The library, Drottningholm


    The interior of the palace is in early Baroque style of the 1660s and 1670s. Rooms not to be missed are the beautiful staircase (see photo previous tip), the Ehrenstrahl Drawing Room and the Hedvig Eleonora's State Bedchamber. The room I liked best of all though is the library (see photo).

    The library is the creation of Princess Lovisa Ulrika of Prussia. Lovisa Ulrika had quite a few interesting collections, which made Drottningholm a popular spot for leading scientists of that time to visit the castle. Carl von Linné (Carl Linnaeus) for example worked here, cataloguing the royal collections' "natural objects". Carl von Linné is a famous biologist, and is often called the "Father of Taxonomy". His system for naming, ranking, and classifying organisms is still in wide use today.

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    Kina Slott

    by sim1 Updated Jun 11, 2006

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    Kina Slott / Chinese Pavilion


    Time to visit my favourite place at Drottningholm: the Chinese Pavilion! The Chinese Pavilion, or Kina Slott in Swedish, is a small pleasure palace hidden away in the gardens of Drottningholm. No worries though, there are lots of signs pointing you into the right direction, so you can't miss it. If you are at Drottningholm I really would recommend stopping by at Kina Slott as well and most of all, take a guided tour here! I had a tour in Swedish and I enjoyed every minute of it! The tour was interesting, the guide enthusiastic, the Chinese Pavilion itself is so unusual and fascinating: this was easily the highlight of my visit to Drottningholm!

    Opening hours
    May-Aug: Daily 11:00-16.30
    Sept: Daily 12:00-15:30

    Guided tours
    June-Aug: Daily at 11:00, 13:00 and 15:00

    The entrance fee is 60 SEK. If you are thinking of visiting Drottningholm Palace as well I can recommend buying the combined ticket instead which costs 110 SEK.

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    Gustav III, the theatre king

    by sim1 Updated Jun 11, 2006

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    Gustav III, the theatre king


    Drottningholm Theatre had its true period of greatness during the reign of Gustav III, but who was he? Gustav III (1746-1792), also called the Theatre King, became king in 1771. After one year on the throne he made, with support of France, a coup d'tat to increase his power. He ruled despite his dictatorship in the name of "enlighten autocracy" and carried through many reforms. The most important was freedom of religion and the ban of torture. He also changed the law so that the number of crimes with the death penalty was decreased.

    He was a big sponsor of cultural activity and built many theatres in his castles, i.e. Gripsholm and Drottningholm and also Haga Park. He started many academies like "Svenska Akademin" (now responsible for the Nobel prize in literature). He played in many theatre shows..... it is been said that he wasn't a good actor though :-)

    He was assassinated by a group of people, when he was participating in a "Masquerade" at the Opera. The group was lead by Johan Anckarström who shot the king with a pistol. The king was hated by the nobility because of his reduction of their privileges and they were the "sponsor" of the murder. Gustav III died 13 days later from his wounds. Anckarström was beheaded one month later, the other in the group expelled from the country.

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    The theatre

    by sim1 Updated Jun 11, 2006

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    The Theatre


    Directly beside the Palace you can see the The Drottningholm Palace Theatre, or in Swedish called "Drottningholms Slottsteater". The Slottsteater is an opera house from 1766. Nowadays it is run by a private foundation, but you can visit it and it is even in function as a real theatre! I would love to go here to watch a theatre play some day, but it is quite hard as tickets are sold out quickly.

    What makes this theatre so special is that it is still the way it used to be centuries ago. Quite a sad history caused it to be like this: The theatre was built for Gustav III by his mother in 1766. Gustav III loved the theatre and therefore was often called the Theatre King (see next tip). In 1792 he was assassinated and his grieving mother Louisa Ulrika of Prussia decided to close up the theatre at Drottningholm. The theatre had been forgotten about for many generations but in 1920s it was rediscovered. Because the theatre had not been used or touched in so many years, almost all the original equipment is still there.

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    Statues and fountains

    by sim1 Updated Jun 11, 2006

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    Sculpture in the Embroidery Parterre
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    Inside the formal gardens there are quite a few statues, of which you can see one in the photo. Unfortunately I couldn't get close as most of this area was fenced off. In the centre of the "Embroidery Parterre", which is the formal garden nearest to the Palace, you can see the Hercules Fountain (third photo). This fountain has bronze figures by the sculptor Adriaen de Vries and dominates this part of the garden.

    All the bronzes in the formal garden are by Dutch sculptor Adriaen de Vries (1556-1626). Today these sculptures have been replaced by modern bronze casts and the originals can be seen at the Museum De Vries. The statues were brought to Sweden as trophies of war from Prague in 1648 and also from Fredriksborg, Denmark in 1659. I really enjoyed watching the bronzes in the garden, I only wish I could have gotten a little bit closer to see them a bit more clearly.

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    Take a guided tour

    by sim1 Updated Jun 10, 2006

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    Inside Drottningholm


    A good way to look around inside the palace is by taking a guided tour. During the summertime a guided tour is no problem, but off-season they are only available during the weekends. So take that into account when planning your visit.

    Drottningholm is not only a 'tourist attraction' it is actually still a Royal Palace in every sense of the word as the Palace is the permanent residence of the Royal Family. This also means that that only part of the palace is open to the public. (the rooms in the southern wing of the palace are reserved for the Royal Family).

    Opening hours of Drottningholm palace:
    May - August: daily 10:00 - 16:30
    Sept: daily 12:00 - 15:30
    Oct - April: Sat & Sun 12:00 - 15:30

    Guided tours:
    Swedish and English guided tours are available (separate groups):
    May: Sat & Sun: 10:00, 12:00, 14:00, 16:00
    June-Aug: daily 10:00, 12:00, 14:00, 16:00
    Sept: daily 12:00, 14:00
    Oct-April: Sat & Sun 12:00, 14:00

    The entrance fee is 70 SEK. If you are thinking of visiting Kina Slott (The Chinese Pavilion) as well I can recommend buying the combined ticket instead which costs 110 SEK.

    In the photo you can see the entrance / stairways of the palace.

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    The Versailles of the north??

    by sim1 Updated Jun 9, 2006

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    Drottningholm, the Versailles of the North?


    Drottningholm is often called the "Versailles of the North" and when you look at the photos you can understand why. The architect Nicodemus Tessin the Elder (and later Nicodemus Tessin the Younger, who completed the work) was clearly inspired by the famous French palace. But when you get a bit closer to the palace and walk around in the gardens, you will notice the clear differences between the two.

    Undoubtedly Drottningholm is a nice palace, but it clearly misses the grandeur of Versailles. The gardens and the interiors are nothing in comparison to Versailles when it comes to decorations and details. So don't expect to see a "Versailles" in Stockholm, because then you will go home very disappointed.

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    More then just one thing to see!

    by sim1 Updated Jun 9, 2006

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    Which way to go?


    Drottningholm is not only a palace, it has lots more to offer. You can see the changing of the guards, visit one of the best preserved baroque theatres in Europe, walk through the formal gardens, be surprised by the strange looking Guards' Tent or, and this is my personal favourite, visit Kina Slott!

    There are a view more things to see, like Museum "De Vries" and Drottningholm Palace Chapel. I personally didn't visit these, but you can find more info about them on the Royal Palaces website

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