Norrtälje Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by gugi66
  • Things to Do
    by gugi66
  • Things to Do
    by gugi66

Best Rated Things to Do in Norrtälje

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Pythagoras

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    An amazing industrial heritage! Pythagoras was named after the old Greek philosopher as the factory intended to make calculators. However, the technique failed them and instead, they imported the idea of hot bulb engines from the USA and developed into one of the most famous engine factories in the world. Still today, as the factory is closed, people call from developing countries everywhere to ask for spare parts to Nile cruising boats, farm vehicles in South America and what have you, and usually, they can still get help. Internationally, the products were sold as Drott, and in Sweden as Fram, and here you get to see the factory just like it was the day it closed in 1965, when the last employee died. That is the unique thing with this place; nothing has been arranged but instead it all looks like it always did. Today, the friends of the museum work here to recreate some engines, and these people show you around summertime and kick the engines alive so you get to hear the characteristic two-tact hammering that at least I associate with childhood fishing boats. When the factory finally closed due to the mass introduction of other engines in the world, the land was meant to be used for apartments but was rescued by a clever lady at the town council. Therefore, enjoy a guided walk around which is a lot more fascinating than you think. The Swedish Heritage authority (RAÄ) has designated it amongst the ten most important industrial heritages in the country. There is a small cafe in the old smithy and you also get to see the caretaker's house, including various small exhibitions (women in old factories when we visited). Opening hours are sadly only end of June to mid August with a couple of tours a day so do check their homepage...

    Engine cooling trays outside! Factory entrance Starting up the hot bulb engine Lots of tools
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Town Hall

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The current town hall is from 1730 and was built after the Russians had burnt the town in 1719. Like so many Swedish small town halls, it is a delightful wooden structure and has a clock tower. The cute thing here is that there is a cheese shop in one of its corners.

    In my second picture, you can see what the rest of the square looks like, with its bank building and restaurant.

    Stora Torget
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Södra Bergen views

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The place in town to go for views across the town centre and out towards the Norrtälje Bay. There are several walkways up here from the streets below and at the top, you are met with a viewpoint and a popular restaurant that we never tried.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Wallinska gårdarna

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Another 1730s part of town, created after the Russian destruction, these two "Wallins' yards" houses are adorable. There is a cafe in one of them so you can sit in the square and admire them. The other holds a good book shop.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Roslagens Museum

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The museum, along the northern riverside, is housed in what was formerly a part of the 1622 gun factory, namely the locksmiths smithy. Here, you can learn about the history of the town which of course include the gun factory that was the most important workplace for 200 years. There is also stories on a main Roslagen feature: boats. Both old Roslagen rowing boats and the huge ferries to Finland and Estonia that carefully negotiate the archipelago skerries every day. There is also a herb garden in the grounds.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Societetsparken

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A "Society Park" with adjoining "Society House" were important places for well off Swedes (the respected society) in the 19th century and often exists in small towns by the sea or in spa towns. Norrtälje was famous for its mud in the 19th century and a spa was set up that attracted wealthy citizens from Stockholm. This was therefore then the place to see and be seen. Later on, the house has been torn down, but the park is still there with tennis courts, a band stand, a guest harbour and primarily a generally nice atmosphere down by the sea. You can walk through it and continue to Kärleksudden (the "Love Peninsula") beyond it, which is the town's most central place to go for a swim on a beach. There is also a nice restaurant by the guest harbour (see tip).

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Norrtälje Church

    by Sjalen Updated Jul 19, 2006

    Not the prettiest or oldest Roslagen church by any means, Norrtälje church is still nice to visit because of its unifying history. It got its tower in 1854 but is otherwise from 1724-26 when the bickering Germans and Swedes in town suddenly joined forces to reconstruct a church after the Russians had destroyed the old one in 1719.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Furusund

    by Sjalen Updated Mar 1, 2007

    Furusund is one of the most narrow points along the shipping lane that takes the huge Finland ferries in and out through the Stockholm archipelago, separating Furusund village (reached by bridges from the mainland) from the island of Yxlan. It is therefore well known (even since the 13th century) and there is even a famous song about a lovely evening in the area by our icon trubadour Taube. The sea is what makes this place - the final island in a string before the narrow strait. In 1522, the Swedish and Lubeck navies beat the Danish navy in a battle in the waters just outside. The village here then grew because of archipelago piloting and a customs office and then it became a fashionable seaside resort in the 19th century which is why it has many wonderful old villas even though the "musical promenades" are long gone.

    You can see Furusund from one of the giant ferries mentioned earlier, more than two hours after leaving Stockholm as they have to be slow navigating their way forwards. Otherwise, go here by car along the mainland which has been possible since 1953, in which case you pass some wonderful old oaks. Catching an archipelago boat from Stockholm is another way to get here. There are no great sights here, but the Telegraph Museum with the only optical telegraph in Sweden to have been saved is interesting if that is your cup of tea since these things were what sent messages between Stockholm and the archipelago before the breakthrough of the telephone. There is also Sjövillan, the house that was Astrid Lindgren's summer house, and rumour has it that it was in Furusund that Astrid saw a horse on someone's veranda. The literary world's most famous spotted horse was a fact. Not that she was the only literary figure to stay here. Strindberg did it too as did several painters and other arty people in its heydays.

    You could sit here for ages just watching boats coming and going, including the road ferries to Yxland and Blidö, or dine at the inn (see tip).

    Hey, we're catching in on you Viking!
    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Ängsö National Park

    by Sjalen Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Ängsö is a small national park compared to most, but that's because it is on an island. Instead, it is one of Sweden's oldest, as it was made a national park already in 1909 and famous for its old meadows. In those days, no one understood that by stopping the farmer from working the land, everything they wanted to protect was overgrown by spruce and other trees so in the 1930s they started working the land again, but still in the old fashioned way so that what you see are meadowlands full of rare plants in summer. There is also a lot of birdlife which you get with old fashioned farming. Only in the northern part of the island is a bit of forest left to itself and has become quite old but here you have archipelago birds of prey. You reach it by boat from Stockholm (see second link below) and there is only a nature exhibition in the harbour so no restaurants or other services so I suggest eating on the boat. I haven't yet been here myself but I couldn't keep a national park off this page. If you want pictures and a lot more info, look at sim1's page.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Norrtälje

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

24 travelers online now

Comments

Norrtälje Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Norrtälje things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Norrtälje sightseeing.

View all Norrtälje hotels