Language, Stockholm

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  • Do you really wanna go there?
    Do you really wanna go there?
    by marielexoteria
  • Language
    by Sjalen
  • A Gun-shop?
    A Gun-shop?
    by vec
  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Funny names (when translated from other languages)

    by marielexoteria Updated Feb 1, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Do you really wanna go there?

    Being a trilingual person (Spanish, Swedish and English) who loves languages, I can't help but look at the billboards, bus stops, etc on my way to [insert place name here]. The funniest one I've seen is Tumba, which is a suburb south of Södermalm. You see, the thing is that tumba is the Spanish word for grave. No wonder the commuter trains having Tumba as their final destination are always empty compared to the other southbound trains....it's just that nobody wants to go there :D

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  • Arial_27's Profile Photo

    Taler du Svenska?

    by Arial_27 Updated Sep 29, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Swedish flag

    SWEDISH SPEAKERS: If you want to test your Swedish proficiency, visit:
    http://www.transparent.com/tlquiz/proftest/swedish/tlswetest.htm

    NON- SWEDISH SPEAKERS: Although most people you meet in Sweden speak pretty good English, it's always fun to learn a few useful words and phrases of the country you're visiting...you'll see it'll be well appreciated.

    1. Hej (HEY)= hello

    2. Tack (TUCK)= Thank you

    3. Varsågad (VAR-SHOW-GOED) = You're welcome

    4. Sverige/Svenska (SVER-EE-YA / SVEN-SKA) = Sweden/Swedish

    5. Engelska (ENG-EL-SKA) = English

    6. Hur mycket är klockan (HOOR MEE-KET ER KLOCK-AN) = What time is it?

    7. Var är toaletten? (VAHR ER TOL-ETTAN)= Where are the washrooms?

    8. Hejdå (HEY-DOE) = Goodbye

    9. Hur går det (HOOR GORE DET)= How's it going?

    10. Jag heter ___ (YOG HETER)= My name is_____

    11. Var kommer du i från? (VAR KOMMER DOO EE-FRON) = Where do you come from?

    12. Jag taler inte svenska (YOG TALLER EEN-TEH SVEN-SKA)= I don't speak Swedish

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  • vec's Profile Photo

    No Guns

    by vec Updated Apr 4, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Gun-shop?

    Don't be surprised if you see a sign like this one. This is not a gun-shop. It's a tobacconist's. And then you might wonder, why is it called Guns. It's easy. Gun is the 54'ht most common female name. You will find 36260 Gun all over Sweden.

    In Gamla stan you can also take a cup of coffee at Guns Cafe.

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    They're not swearing at you!

    by Marpessa Updated Oct 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When walking through Stockholm and past the many shops I saw a word written across the windows in big letters and got a bit of shock, because in english this is not a complimentary word at all. It would only be when I got to Goteborg that I would find out the meaning of it (although I had guessed).

    And the word is 'sl*t' (insert a vowel where the star is - I didn't think I should actually write it). The signs would say 'Sl*t Rea' which means, basically 'end of sale'.

    So english speakers, don't take offence, as it is not slander in swedish! :)

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  • English works everywhere in Sweden

    by Iwantacoolname Written Apr 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most Swedes love to speak English and will use any excuse they can to do so, in fact I have on several occasions come across Swedes pretending to be foreigners, usually Americans since most Swedes speak with an American accent, even though they are though British English in school. These people usually come out during the summer but I doubt they fool anyone and I think they only target Swedes. Most Swedes will be glad to help if it means they get to speak English.

    A lot of American expressions and works have worked their way in to the Swedish language, mostly foul words used but kid/teens.

    Swedes have a tendency of translate Swedish sayings in to English thinking they will make sense, and if they don?t know the word in English they may use the Swedish version hoping it sounds similar which can sometimes lead to confusions.

    Swedes won?t expect you to know any Swedish but I?m sure they will laugh if you try to speak it.

    Swedes are full of surprises and sometimes it helps just to ask really loud if anyone speaks your language, like the time when I was at a small gift shop in Gamla Stan and the desperate store clerk said, 'Ah, does anyone here speak Russian!?' and a woman in the store said, 'Yes' and went over to translate and solve the problem with the Russian couple.

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  • "Hey Hey!"

    by marcfromburlington Written Jul 21, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I just loved the fact that when lined up for something in a store or a McDonald's you're almost always greeted with a cute "Hey Hey!" form the person at the register.

    Fight the urge to answer back with "Hey Hey!" - they'll think you speek Swedish. Answering back with a "Hey Hey HEYYYYYY?!?" will produce even worse results. :)

    I'm just kidding of course, but if you do answer back with a "Hey Hey!", no matter how cute it is, they'll think you're Swedish and if you don't know any you'll be promptly lost from there on in.

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  • Maline's Profile Photo

    what are those letters?

    by Maline Written Jun 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Three letters in the Swedish alphabet may look odd to some visitors. the a with a ring, Å, the a with two dots, Ä and the o with two dots Ö.
    Don't worry, lemme explain...:
    Originally, the main vowel was the big one, and the less pronounced one was made small and put on top of the other, so the a with a ring, is actually an A with an O on top. NOW you get it, right?!

    The pronounciation lies between the two lettres, similar to the english soung of a in "false". (Enlgish sound, not the american one, pretend to be british and say FALSE out loud... there you go!)

    A and O with tho dots, were originally A and O with an E above. So, the pronounciation of th A with two dots is simila to the english sound of ai in "hair".
    The o with two dots sound somewhat like the english sound of u in the word "fur".

    there you go, now you can TALK LIKE A SWEDE..!

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  • Maline's Profile Photo

    A little Swedish...

    by Maline Updated Jul 3, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This could be YOU!

    OK, so you speak English? That will get you around in Sweden and in Stockholm, no doubt about it.
    Swedes are good at English, we learn it from an early age, and it ressembles Swedish a lot.

    Still, would you like some Swedish words? Here you go:

    Hello
    Hej

    Goodbye
    Hej d?

    I am from England/America/Germany/France
    Jag ?r fr?n England/Amerika/Tyskland/Frankrike

    How much is...
    Vad kostar...

    Do you have any vegetarian dishes?
    Har ni n?got vegetariskt?

    smorgasbord
    sm?rg?sbord

    excuse me...
    urs?kta...

    Where is the nearest Metro station?
    Var finns n?rmaste tunnelbanestation?

    I need a coffee right now
    Jag beh?ver en kaffe. NU!

    This is not what I expected
    Det h?r ?r inte vad jag v?ntade mig.

    I think Swedish is much too difficult for me, can you please speak English?
    Jag tycker att svenska ?r alldeles f?r sv?rt f?r mig, vill du vara s? v?nlig och tala engelska?

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  • Language

    by YellowMelon Updated Dec 2, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although most Swedes speak English very well they will certainly smile at you addressing them in Swedish.

    Some useful phrases include:

    Hello: Hej / Hallå / Tjenare
    How are you?: Hur är det? / Hur mår du?
    How do I get to... (a place, street etc.): Hur hittar jag till...
    I don't speak Swedish: Jag talar inte svenska.
    Thank you!: Tack! / Tack så mycket!
    Yes: Ja
    No: Nej
    How much is...: Hur mycket kostar...

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  • English works everywhere.

    by Iwantacoolname Written Apr 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most Swedes love to speak English and will use any excuse they can to do so, in fact I have on several occasions come across Swedes pretending to be foreigners, usually Americans since most Swedes speak with an American accent, even though they are though British English in school. These people usually come out during the summer but I doubt they fool anyone and I think they only target Swedes. Most Swedes will be glad to help if it means they get to speak English.

    A lot of American expressions and works have worked their way in to the Swedish language, mostly foul words used but kid/teens.

    Swedes have a tendency of translate Swedish sayings in to English thinking they will make sense, and if they don?t know the word in English they may use the Swedish version hoping it sounds similar which can sometimes lead to confusions.

    Swedes won?t expect you to know any Swedish but I?m sure they will laugh if you try to speak it.

    Swedes are full of surprises and sometimes it helps just to ask really loud if anyone speaks your language, like the time when I was at a small gift shop in Gamla Stan and the desperate store clerk said, ?Ah, does anyone here speak Russian!?? and a woman in the store said, ?Yes? and went over to translate and solve the problem with the Russian couple.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Excellent English Language Skills

    by barryg23 Updated Jan 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We met very few Swedish people in Stockhom who didn't speak English. In the B&B where we stayed, our hostess and all her family spoke excellent English, and it was a similar story in the shops, bars and restaurants which we visited. I had tried to learn a few Swedish phrases but there was little need for it anywhere.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Funny place names

    by Sjalen Written Oct 3, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stockholm is one of the best places for a student of Swedish, looking for funny place names. Everyone's favourite is "Pungpinan" as shown by this bus stop picture. The word "pung" means scrotum and "pina" means pain :))) But of course that's not how we name things around here. The simple explanation is that "pung" also means satchel as in a satchel of money or "pengapung" and Pungpinan was simply a famous inn on the southern road to Stockholm, which literally fleeced its customers as they knew people needed a rest here...

    Other interesting names are for instance Blåsut ("blow out") and Ropsten ("calling stone") where calls for a ferry could be heard before there was a bridge. There are also names you'd expect to find elsewhere such as Inverness!

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  • In Sweden speak Swedish or English

    by Sofiabuh Written Nov 11, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the things Swedes really don't like is someone coming to Sweden speaking any other language than Swedish or English.
    The way we see it is that we have made an effort to learn the international language and so should everybody else do too.

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  • bottleofdoom's Profile Photo

    If you don't speak swedish,...

    by bottleofdoom Written Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you don't speak swedish, it's ok. Everybody speaks english. But most of the time, they will assume you are swedish & start speaking swedish to you. Just say 'I'm sorry, I dont' speak swedish' and they will understand & speak english to you. Unless of course you can't speak english, then I'm not sure what will happen. I found this easier than trying to approach a person with 'Do you speak english?' (Of course they do). They usually look at you like dah!!! It's better to apologize for not speaking their language first.

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  • cvsolfari's Profile Photo

    Within Sweden, most people...

    by cvsolfari Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Within Sweden, most people speak English, but do try to learn a few words/phrases before you go... I do recommend the Berlitz book for a quick session.

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