Unique Places in Stockholm

  • Sigtuna: Runic stone near the lake
    Sigtuna: Runic stone near the lake
    by HORSCHECK
  • Sigtuna: Ruins of St. Per Church
    Sigtuna: Ruins of St. Per Church
    by HORSCHECK
  • Sigtuna: Town Hall
    Sigtuna: Town Hall
    by HORSCHECK

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Stockholm

  • budapest8's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Sődermalm, old prolitarian part of the city

    by budapest8 Written May 21, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Stockholm is such a modern city made up of
    a collection of many small and large islands connected
    together by by roads, bridges and an underground metro.
    Sődermalm covers the large island formerly called "Åsön".
    With a population of about 100 000, it is one of the most
    densely populated districts of Scandinavia.
    Moving to Sweden aged 21 I spent many a Summers night
    and early morning wandering about the small streets and
    side streets leading to incredible places one just could not imagine
    could exist. Some places made me think that time had stood still
    and preserved the buildings and area like a well hidden secret.

    Södermalm was mainly a rural, agricultural area. Its first urban areas were planned and built in the mid 17th century, comprising a mixture of working class housing, such as the little red cottages that can still to be seen in northeastern Södermalm, and the summer houses and pavilions of wealthier families, such as Emanuel Swedenborg's pavilion, which is to be seen in the outdoor museum Skansen. During this time, it was also the location of perhaps the first theatre in Scandinavia, Björngårdsteatern. Södermalm is often poetically named "Söders höjder", which reflects its topography of sheer cliffs and rocky hills. Indeed the hills of Södermalm provide remarkable views of Stockholm's skyline.

    In the 18th century, the working-class cottages that clung to Mariaberget, the steep cliffs facing Riddarfjärden, were replaced by the large buildings that are still present today. It was not until the beginning of the 20th century that urbanisation grasped the entire width of Södermalm, and even today parts of Södermalm have a rural feeling to them, as for instance the landscape of tiny allotments that climb the slopes of Eriksdal.

    Today I noticed that most of the elderly population have been replaced by young
    families and single people who either work or students.

    Also, rather than being known as a slum, Södermalm is now known as home of bohemian, alternative culture and a broad range of cultural amenities. Meanwhile, the growing demand of housing, as well as an increasing gentrification of Stockholm's central parts, makes apartments in Södermalm more and more difficult or expensive to come by. Thus what was once a working-class district is now somewhat a district of the privileged

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    A viking ship in the middle of the woods

    by marielexoteria Updated Sep 21, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The landscape between Stockholm's central station and Märsta station never makes me bored. I can see from rails where other trains go to other destinations, trees and fields, beautiful houses, lake Mälaren and now a viking ship. I discovered this ship when the train stopped due to ... (the "..." is because they don't bother to give you an explanation of why the train stopped) and I looked out the window.

    The ship is located between Upplands Väsby and Märsta, but I don't know how to get to the ship by foot (since it's located in the middle of the woods), who built it or why - which is why I wouldn't recommend you take the commuter train to Märsta only to glimpse the ship (I'll do that for you). However, do it if you're visiting Sigtuna, which is very interesting in itself.

    You'll see the ship the best if you sit on the window seats on the left side of the train, if it's going towards Märsta, and on the right side if you're going towards Stockholm.

    The pictures of the boat aren't the best because I found it quite difficult to picture it while the train was moving at 100 km/h :)

    Edit Sept 2009: the viking ship has been moved and now can be seen along the E4 right before passing by Upplands Väsby.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Roggeveen's Profile Photo

    Swimming in open water

    by Roggeveen Written Aug 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The water in and araound Stockholm is usualy clean enough to swimm. There are several places (on the tourist maps) where you can find swimming facilities, like a shower. We went to the island of langholmen for a refreshing swim.
    Tube station: Fridhemsplan

    Related to:
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • gugi66's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    GREAT WIEW

    by gugi66 Updated Mar 5, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    DON´T MISS THIS BEAUTIFUL WIEW AND PHOTO OPPORTUNITY. GO UP WITH THE KATARINA ELEVATOR (IT COSTS 10 KRONOR, ABOUT 1,7 USD OR 1 EUR) JUST LOOK AT THE PICTURES.

    THE KATARINA ELEVATOR IS RIGHT BESIDE THE TUNNELBANA (SUBWAY, METRO) SLUSSEN.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Going to Tallinn from Stockholm

    by jumpingnorman Written Oct 21, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The cruise from Stockholm to Estonia

    I rode the Silja/Tallink Romantika line which is a huge cruise ship with luxurious smorgasbords, duty-free shopping, and plenty of entertainment which include discos, saunas and gambling. I booked on-line while I was still in the USA (about 120 Euro for the one-way ferry and 10 Euro for the breakfast). The boat left from Frihamnen port.
    Viking Lines is the competitor and has a more “party boat” reputation. It is like a Pepsi vs. Coke battle between these two lines which have the biggest and most inexpensive luxury hotels on the Baltic Sea.
    My boat left Stockholm at about 6 PM and arrived the next day at about 10 AM in Tallinn, Estonia at Terminal D (see below).

    Passenger terminals are located a short distance from the medieval Old Town of Tallin.
    Terminals
    A-terminal serves Viking Line ferries to/from Helsinki, Eckerö Line ferry and SuperSeaCat high-speed vessels to Helsinki
    B-terminal serves Eckerö Line ferries and SuperSeaCat high-speed vessels from Helsinki
    C-terminal serves Nordic Jet Line's high-speed vessels to/from Helsinki
    D-terminal serves Tallink ferries and high-speed vessels to/from Helsinki and Tallink ferries to/from Stockholm.
    Linnahall terminal serves Linda Line's high-speed vessels to/from Helsinki

    TALLINK SILJA OY
    PL210
    20101 TURKU Finland
    Reg. 0114296-7 , VAT FI01142967
    +358 0600 174 552

    Related to:
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toshioohsako's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    A beautiful garden outside Stockholm

    by Toshioohsako Written Sep 30, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Millesgården was designed by Carl Milles and was built 1908. Its a garden overlooking the sea and it is beautiful. Its high up on a cliff where you can see big cruisers going to Helsinki, Tallin, Riga, etc. It has a unique architecture with very interesting motives of sculptures. Millesgården has a very pleasant cafeteria with a nice view (indoor cafeteria only in winter).

    The garden is on the beautiful island of Lidingör connected to Stockholm by a bridge. Its a little off the capital but I recommend visitors to come here to enjoy the splendid garden - my favorite!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • gugi66's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Swimming pool for free

    by gugi66 Updated Sep 1, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Outside swimmingpool for free. 25 meters long swimmingpool and a small pool for little children. There is a small cafeteria who sells sandwiches, coffeey and ice cream, there is toilets availeble.

    How to get here? Take the Tunnelbana (subway/metro) to station Björkhagen and then it´s a 10 minutes walk.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • gugi66's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    The beach in Mälarhöjden

    by gugi66 Written Aug 5, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A beach south of Stockholm (about 10 minutes with car). This beach dont have a kiosk so buy water and food before you come here, sometimes there is a guy there who sells sausages and beverages, but not all the time. Free parking

    If you want to come here by public transportation take the Tunnelbana (subway/metro) to station Bredäng or Skärholmen and then take bus 135 to Mälarhöjdsbadet, then it´s a 5-10 minutes walk from the bus station.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • kanjon's Profile Photo

    Visit Miniature Sweden

    by kanjon Updated Apr 10, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sundbyberg is a small town so close to Stockholm it has its own stop in the Stockholm Metro-net. When Stockholm grew in the end of the 19´th centrury, so did Sundbyberg. I like to compare the historic growing Sundbyberg to the Klondike of the Gold-rush. Want to check out more in detail? Visit my Sundbyberg travel page!

    People have lived in the area for 2000 years and with all this time put together, today you can visit Sundbyberg and get an overall view of a small (ideological) copy of Sweden. Its social democratic history, its institutions, the inhabitants from industrial city workers to civil servants,the wel-fare situation, ideals and changes into modern times, all is there. There are interesting historical sites to see, VERY good cafés and bakeries, unique shopping (vintage, good markets, Finnish specialtiies, fabrics...), beautiful nature scenery and quite a good, partially wild, nightlife. So, go on ahead!

    You can choose to travel with either the metro or the suburban train.

    With the suburban train towards Bålsta or Kungsängen (nr 35), the journey takes about 8 minutes from T-Centralen. The trains leave at the platsforms by the railway station, not by the metro-lines.

    With blue metro line (nr 10) towards Hjulsta, the journey takes about 12 minutes from T-Centralen. If you choose the metro there are quite nicely done subway-art installations to enjoy on most stops on the blue line. Get off and take a close look and take the next train, or just watch through the window.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • agustath's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Kulturhuset

    by agustath Updated Mar 29, 2008

    Kulturhuset is 95% used by Stockholmers and houses a café, library, exhibitions of photography, art and design, a theatre and much more. So this house on four floors is a vivid cultural meeting point for people. You can sit down and have a coffee, play chess, read the newspapers, sit on the balcony (during summer) and enjoy the view of the city. So if you want to meet with the locals, this is the place to visit.
    On one floor there is a special room for the kids, where they can come with their parents, to play, read books, do some handicrafts, sing... It's called "Rum for rörelse" and there you can dance, slide, crawl, climb.... If you are travelling with kids, do not miss this!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • School Holidays

    Was this review helpful?

  • kanjon's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Bergianska Garden: The Tamed and the Wild

    by kanjon Updated Mar 27, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the Bergian garden (Bergianska trädgården) there are 9000 different species of plants; all kinds of flower arrangements, big herb-garden, the worlds largest water lily, seemingly wild but cultivated milieus, apple-clones, a beautiful miniature water and plant landscape of northern Japan, insect-catching plants, vegetables, exhibitions on all from art to gardening, guided walks, seminars… All for the nature- and garden enthusiasts!

    The surroundings are great for picnics in spring and summer. Bring a basket with food and wine and go back to nature. If you bring the gear, you can even take a swim! In the evening, the setting is lit up by the most romantic shimmer from the setting sun.

    If you want to have a more "cultivated" meal the Edvard Anderson greenery has a café with sandwiches, pastries, coffee and icecream. There is also a museumshop. This is available without paying the entrance fee to the greenery. I f you pay you get access to the terrace inside the greenhouse and can have your coffee with a beautiful view of the Mediterranian plant collection. Open daily 11-17. There is also an outdoor café by the Old Orangerie in the summertime. Open 11-16.30.

    The park is open daily from 8-21. Free of charge. If you want to visit the greenhouses you pay a fee; The Victoria house with exotic plants 20 skr and the Edvard Anderson conservatory with Mediterranian plants 50 skr. Free admission with the Stockholm card.

    The garden were built in 1885, funded by money and collections from the two Bergius brothers, Peter Jonas and Bengt; the Bergianska foundation, set up 1791. The brothers used to run an estate with garden-school and an extensive plant collection (Bergielund) at Karlbergsvägen in Stockholm. In 1885 Bergius garden was moved and set the start for Bergianska gardens´scientific aims.

    The garden is situated in the north of Stockholm, by the water and beautiful surroundings of Brunnsviken, close to the Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, about 5 km from Stockholm city centre.

    Metro, take the red line nr 14 to stop Universitetet, exit and take left and walk for about 10 minutes. Check map among this post´s images.

    Adress: Veit Wittrocks väg, (Frescati), Stockholm

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • kanjon's Profile Photo
    2 more images

    Art and Flowers: The Marabou Park

    by kanjon Updated Mar 24, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Marabou Park (Marabouparken) has it all. It is both a beautiful park with modern sculptures and a well-selected, personal, contemporary art institution. For contemporary art, visit the space any time of the year, for park visit, choose spring, summer or early autumn. In spring it is amazing. All the flowers in bloom make a gorgeous setting for picnics and slow strolls. In the summer there is a flat pool where children can play and swim and a small kiosk with coffee, ice cream and pastries.

    This is well worth the trip, take the Metro, blue line 10 (journey takes about 11 minutes) and then walk through Sundbyberg. The small city has very nice cafés (try Café Boulevard) and a the famous, almost insanely well-equipped fabric shop, Sundbybergs Textilcentrum (check out on www.textilcentrum.se), where some of the fabrics used in the Lord of the Ring trilogy were bought. Cool.

    The founder of the chocolate factory Marabouparken, Henning Throne-Holst, commissioned a recreational park for the employees. Year after year the plants grew and so did the sculpture collection. Now the factory has been sold and moved, but the park remains, founded by Sundbyberg city. The founders of the art exhibition space is Sundbybergs stad and Kraft foods Sweden AB. For exhibition programme, maps and directions check English website: http://www.marabouparken.se/index.php?lang=eng&year=&nav=aktuellt

    The Marabou park is considered to be one of the most important works by Swedish landscape architect Sven Hermelin (1900-1984). Hermelin worked on the park for eighteen years, from 1937 until the inaugeration in 1955. The park's landscaped settings were in many cases created especially for the sculptures.

    During 2008/2009 the art space will be rebuilt so check the homepage for programme and opening hours. There you can also find information on guided tours in the park.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Elena77's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Riddarholmen by night

    by Elena77 Written Oct 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Riddarholmen is an islet right at the heart of Stockholm and together with Gamla Stan it is the oldest part of the city. In the early 17th century the island was given to aristocracy and high-ranking members of the military who built their residences and palaces here. Two of them can be visited today: Wrangelska Palatset and Stenbockska Palatset. The islet is also famous for Riddarholmskyrkan (a 13th century church where the Royal sepultures take place) and Birger Jarls Torn (a 16th century fortress built by King Gutstav I).
    Due to all these sites on such a small area, Riddarholmen can be quite crowded and hectic over the day. So I decided to return by night and found the place beautifully illuminated and, due to the fact that I was the only person far and wide, pleasantly quiet. Riddarholmen by night has got a charm of its own and leaves a completely different impression than a visit by daylight.
    Standing at Birger Jarls Torn you also have a nice view of the harbour, Stadshuset and the illuminated city.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Kista Galleria

    by marielexoteria Updated Sep 6, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mall with a lot of shops, movie theaters and a big food court with different restaurants. Besides the food court, there's Burger King, McDonald's, 2 ice cream bars, a pastry shop/bakery and several cafés.

    I can particularly recommend Forno Romano on the food court and Café Momo on the first floor (I love their Middle Eastern decor).

    Address: Kista Centrum
    Access: from T-Centralen, take the blue subway line towards Akalla and get off at Kista Centrum.

    Was this review helpful?

  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Boulebar

    by marielexoteria Updated Sep 6, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A different kind of sports bar, featuring boule-pétanque. There's a small ball, and the goal of the game is to throw metal balls as close to this little one as possible. This game is played on sand like "fields" and on teams of up to 6 people each.

    At boulebar you get an instructor included on the price of the game fields, to explain the rules of the game, help you out with it and give you tips.

    The bar has a nice (but maybe small) selection of beer and drinks, and they have a good buffet.

    Address: Surbrunnsgatan 46.
    Access: Nearest subway stations: Rådmansgatan and Odenplan. Green subway line towards Hässelby strand.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Stockholm Hotels

See all 226 Hotels in Stockholm

Latest Stockholm Hotel Reviews

Hotel Formula 1
32 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 17, 2013
Grand Hotel Stockholm
474 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 10, 2014
Ibis Stockholm Hagersten
23 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 6, 2014
Yasuragi Hasseludden
44 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 8, 2014
Radisson Blu Strand Hotel
301 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 9, 2014
Hostel af Chapman
61 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 30, 2014
Alexandra
80 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 7, 2014
Accome Kista Stockholm
53 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 2, 2014
Welcome Hotel Barkarby
46 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 3, 2014
Jumbo Hostel
86 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 23, 2014
Anno 1647 Hotell Stockholm
64 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jan 2, 2014
Gustav Af Klint Hotel/Hostel
23 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Nov 25, 2013
Hotel J Nacka Strand
162 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 30, 2014
City BackPackers Hostel
304 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 10, 2014

Instant Answers: Stockholm

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

79 travelers online now

Comments

Stockholm Off The Beaten Path

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Stockholm locals.
Map of Stockholm