Kungliga Slottet - Royal Palace, Stockholm

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  • gugi66's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by gugi66 Written Jul 21, 2008

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    The castle looking from Gustav Adolfs torg
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    The Royal Palace of Stockholm is His Majesty The King's official residence and is also the setting for most of the monarchy's official receptions. The palace is a daily place of work for The King and Queen as well as for the various departments that make up the Royal Court.

    This combination of royal residence, workplace and culture-historical monument open year round to visitors makes the Royal Palace of Stockholm unique amongst Europe's royal residences.

    The palace is built in baroque style by the architect Nicodemus Tessin and is formed as a Roman palace. The palace has more than 600 rooms divided between seven floors with a state apartment facing the city and smaller living rooms facing the inner courtyard.

    The palace contains many interesting things to see. In addition to the Royal Apartments there are three museums steeped in regal history: the Treasury with the regalia, the Tre Kronor Museum that portrays the palaces medieval history and Gustav III's Museum of Antiquities.

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    The Royal Palace

    by bijo69 Written Oct 17, 2007

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    The Royal Palace supposedly is the largest of its kind the world with 608 rooms. The king still has his working quarters here, but resides in Drottningholm. The palace was built during 60 years after the old one burned down in 1697.
    You can visit the royal apartments as long as there isn't an official reception (I was unlucky, the Bulgarian president was being entertained there).
    A couple of other museums occupy some place in the palace. I visited the Treasury where you can marvel at the crowns and swords of former kings (quite small) and the Tre Kronor museum which is dedicated to the history of the old palace (Tre Kronor).
    Opening times depend on the season, so check before you go. Admission to the museums is 90 SEK each!

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    Royal Palace aka Kungliga Slottet

    by jumpingnorman Written Oct 26, 2008

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    Royal Palace, Stockholm, Sweden

    The Stockholm Palace (Swedish: Stockholms slott) is the official residence and major royal palace of the Swedish monarch. I stumbled upon it without the help of any map as I was walking through Gamla Stan. It was late at night and uniformed guards watched the area around the 609-room palace.
    I read that the palace was guarded by the Högvakten, a royal guard of members of the Swedish Armed Forces. They date back to the early 16th century. The next morning, I passed by again and saw more guards.

    See the statue of Stockholm-builder King Gustav III who loved the arts and founded the Royal Dramatic Theater and Opera. By a wicked twist of fate, he was assassinated in a masquerade ball at Royal Opera House in 1792.

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    Royal Palace

    by HORSCHECK Updated Dec 7, 2013

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    Royal Palace (Kungliga Slottet)
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    The Royal Palace (Kungliga Slottet) is the official residence of the Swedish King Carl XVI Gustav. It has more than 600 rooms and is therefore the biggest palace in the world, which is still used by a head of state.

    The Royal Palace was built in Italian Baroque style between 1697 and 1754 on the site of the former medieval castle "Tre Kronor".

    Directions:
    The Royal Palace is located in the northeastern corner of the old town (Gamla Stan).
    The nearest metro stop is "Gamla Stan".

    Website: http://www.royalcourt.se/

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    Royal Palace

    by magor65 Written Sep 16, 2004

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    Royal Palace

    Royal palace was built in 18th century on the remains of Tre Kronor Castle, destroyed by the fire in 1697. Designed by Tessin the younger in the style of Italian Baroque.
    The King and Queen of Sweden don't live here any more, but they have here their offices and it's a place where they receive foreign diplomats and other guests.
    One of the tourist attractions is the Changing of the Guards, which from June to August takes place at 12.10 on weekdays, and at 1.10 p.m. on Sundays and public holidays. In low season it is usually on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.
    Tourists have access to the Royal Apartments including the Hall of State, Tre Kronor Museum and Treasury. I don't want to discourage anyone, but personally I found them a little boring and modest, in comparison to other places of this kind.

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    THE ROYAL PALACE - ROYAL CHAPEL - 3

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Royal Chapel
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    As we weren't able to do a Palace tour, we decided to go and have a look at the Royal Chapel, located in the opposite door to where the entrance ticket's are bought.

    The Royal Chapel is FREE OF CHARGE.

    During the summer season the chapel is open to the public twice a week, allowing a viewing of the interior, architecture and art.
    The chapels interior was completed in the middle of the 1700s, and includes sculptures, statues and ceiling paintings, it's beautiful!

    The Royal Chapels morning services and masses with music every Sunday is at 11:00am. During During the summer month's, there is an organ concert every Friday at 1pm.

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    Stockholm Slott (The Royal Palace)

    by tejanasueca Updated Aug 4, 2004

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    Stockholm Slott (The Royal Palace)

    The first building on this site was a fortress built in the 13th century by Birger Jarl to defend Lake Mälaren. The palace got its name, Tre Kronor (Three Crowns) in the middle of the 14th century when King Magnus, who was then King of the three Kingdoms Sweden, Norway, and Skane lived there. Today, you can still find reminantes of this old palace behind the façade of the northern wing.

    In the 16th century, under King John III, much work was done to transform the old fortress into a renaissance palace. In 1690, it was decided to transform the palace into baroque palace. In 1692, work began on the northern side. However, May 7, 1697, there was a huge fire, which destroyed most of the palace (except for the newly renowated north side).

    A new palace, after a design by architect Nicodemus Tessin, was built to replace the old. The reconstruction was estimated to take 5 years, however, not until 1754, almost sixty years after the fire, when most of the palace (except for the northwest wing) was finished, was the royal family (King Adolf Fredrik and his family) able to move back in. The northwest wing was finished 1760. Despite this, there were no changes made to the 1697 design.

    Stockholm Palace, or Stockholms slott, is still the official residence of the Swedish monarch (however, the Royal Family does not live here anymore, they live at Drottningholm Palace, just outside of Stockholm). The personal offices of the king and the other members of the Royal Family, as well as the administrative offices of the Royal Court of Sweden, is located at Stockholm Palace. The palace is also used for representative purposes by the king in performing his duties as the head of state.

    You can enter the palace and see a selected number of rooms. The enterance is by the Outer Courtyard (southwest side).

    Look for when the flag of the Swedish monarch (a Swedish flag with three points and a lion weapon) is flying ontop of the palace – that means that King Carl VI Gustav is in the palace!

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    Walking to the The Royal Palace

    by sim1 Updated Jun 9, 2007

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    View on the Storkyrkan from the Royal Palace
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    From the Storkyrkan you are only a few steps away from the the Royal Palace. When you get out of the Cathedral, take a right from the entrance and take a right again at Storkyrkobrinken. The first sign of the Royal Palace will be this freezing guard, hahaha, if you go in the winter that is, lol :-)

    In the second picture you can see one of the lions that decorate the outside of the Palace at the northern entrance There are two huge lion statues and they are located at the north side of the Palace, towards the Riksdagshuset / Parliament building. The little hill is called Lejonbacken or translated "The Lions Hill". The lions were placed here in 1704.

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    The Royal Palace

    by sim1 Updated Mar 25, 2007

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    The Royal Palace
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    The palace is still in use by the Royal family (but more like an office than living quarters; the Royal "home" is at Drottningholm). I've only visited parts of the Royal Palace so far, I took a guided tour of the Royal apartments, which includes the State Apartments, The Guest Apartments, The Bernadotte Apartments, The Hall of State and The Apartments of the Orders of Chivalry. I had a really great time here. The Palace was a 'palace' as you might expect it. I really loved the way the guide showed us around. We heard some 'important' facts about the palace, told with a smile in a joking way, hahaha, making the tour a great thing to do. Did you know for example that the palace has ONE more room than Buckingham Palace, lol ;-) But my best memories of the visit to the palace is of the room "Festvåningen", it is really beautiful! It is the largest room in the palace and it has exquisite furniture and wall decorations.

    There are several of opportunities each day, during opening hours, to take part in the regular guided tours of the palace (included in the admission price). These tours cannot be booked in advance. It is best to check the website of the Royal Palace to find out about the times of the tours. There are tours held in Swedish and in English.

    Opening hours of the Royal Apartments in 2007:
    1 Feb - 14 May: Tuesday - Sunday 12:00 - 15:00
    15 May - 31 May: Daily 10:00 - 16:00
    1 June - 31 Aug: Daily 10:00 - 17:00
    16 Aug - 31 Aug: Daily 10:00 - 16:00
    1 Sep - 30 Dec: Tuesday - Sunday 12:00 - 15:00
    2 Jan - 6 Jan: Tuesday - Sunday 12:00 - 15:00
    7 Jan - 31 Jan: closed

    NB : The Royal Apartments are liable to be closed due to state visits and official receptions.

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    ROYAL PALACE [waterside] -1

    by balhannah Written Feb 4, 2012

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    Royal Palace
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    The Royal Palace is a huge complex, so I will cover it over several tip's.

    First, it is the home of His Majesty The King, and also a place of work for the King and the Queen.
    It's where monarchy's official receptions are held, and is also open to the public, making this an unique Royal Palace.

    The palace, built in baroque style, is formed as a Roman palace and has more than 600 rooms divided between seven floors, with a state apartment facing the city and smaller living rooms facing the inner courtyard.

    When I first came upon the Palace I was walking along the water front. Here, there was a high wall with statue's and some flower's, so I went up the step's to see what I could see. A nice gate, a view of the Palace, and the Palace guard.
    I couldn't say I was at all impressed with the guard, very sloppy and wouldn't pass in most countries!

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    THE ROYAL PALACE - 2

    by balhannah Updated Feb 5, 2012

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    Royal Palace
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    Walking up the hill from the Royal Armoury, we came to another Palace guard standing at the entrance way to the Royal Palace.

    The palace was built on the foundation's of the medieval castle - Tre Kronor (Three Crowns), dating back to the mid 13th century which was destroyed by fire.

    It took 57 year's to build the new Palace, and no wonder!
    It has 1430 rooms, 660 with windows and is one of the largest royal palaces in the world still in use for its original purpose.
    I thought the way it's set out is interesting. The palace consists of four rows: western, southern, eastern, and northern, each represent's something different. The southern facade represents the nation, the west facade represents the king, the east facade represents the queen, and the northern facade represents the common royal. These four rows surround the inner courtyard.

    The Royal Apartments are said to be magnificent, ranging in style from baroque to rococo to Gustavian neo-classisism, like the Pillar Hall, and on to the eclectic styles of the 19th century.
    We didn't do a tour, as we wanted to see the changing of the guard's, and you had to buy a time-slot.

    Entrance tickets are sold at the Ticket & Information office in the Outer Courtyard during regular opening hours.
    Tickets are also sold at the entrance to the Treasury and the Tre Kronor Museum.

    OPEN.....
    15 May–16 September: Daily 10:00–5PM
    17 September–14 May: Tuesday–Sunday 12:00–4PM

    ADMISSION IN 2011.....
    Adults SEK 150
    Children 7–18 years old and students SEK 75
    Free entrance for children under 7 years of age in the company of a guardian.
    Includes visit to the Royal Apartments, the Treasury and the Tre Kronor Museum within seven days.
    From 15 May to 16 September, Gustav III's Museum of Antiquities is also included.

    The guided tour takes approx 45 minutes. To follow a guided tour simply buy your entrance ticket and meet at the designated time and place for the start of the tour.

    Excellent value!

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    Changing of the guards

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Changing of the guards at the Royal Palace


    In the summertime things change around the Royal Palace and the square comes alive with a major attraction: the changing of the guards. In June, July and August the guard, complete with a military band, changes at the Royal Palace in Stockholm every day. In the wintertime there is only a small ceremony of the changing of the guards. Off-season the changing of the Royal Guards takes place with a smaller part of a Military band and a march from Mynttorget around the Stockholm Palace. This small winter ceremony takes place on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 12 o'clock and on Sundays at 1 o'clock in the afternoon. So far I've only been able to see this small ceremony (see picture). You can check out this website to see what is happening at what day.: Weekly schedule of the changing of the guards

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    Changing of the guards

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Changing of the guards


    Here is a global schedule of what happens at what time of year with the changing of the guards. It can be busy during the summertime, so I would advice to be here some time in advance. Off season it isn't busy at all, so you only need to be here just in time for the ceremony.

    From June until August the changing of the Royal Guards with a Military Band in the Outer Courtyard of the Palace in Stockholm takes place every day at 1215 hours (on Sundays and holidays at 1315 hours). There are about 20 days with mounted Guards in that period.

    During April, September and October it is mainly only on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 1215 and on Sundays at 1315 hours. There are some days with mounted Guards in the end of April.

    From November until March 31 it is mainly only (with a smaller part of a Military Band) on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 1200 and on Sundays at 1300 hours. A whole Military Band participates some days during Christmas and New Year. No Mounted Guards.

    During May the changing of the Royal Guards with a Military Band in the Outer Courtyard of the Palace in Stockholm takes place every day at 1215 hours (on Sundays and holidays at 1315 hours). About 12 days with mounted Guards also in May.

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    THE ROYAL PALACE - CHANGING OF THE GUARDS - 4

    by balhannah Written Feb 5, 2012

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    The last thing we wanted to see at the Royal Palace, was the changing of the Guard's.
    We walked higher up the hill, and saw that already people were waiting behind barrier's. It was in full sun, so we walked further and found a shady spot. There were already a lot of people here, at least half an hour before.

    On the pavement, you will see a painted line, make sure you stand behind that if you do not have any rope's to stand behind. The guard's will keep on coming and moving you all the time, and in the end, they get sick and tired of people not doing as they are told, and become aggressive.

    We saw the guard's come marching in, the ceremony and then they marched out. There still was more going on, but to tell the truth, we were not that impressed.
    A little sloppy, and the dark blue uniform's looked dullish and drab, if I had my time again, I wouldn't be bothered, and spend my time elsewhere!
    Perhap's if they had been in the bright Blue uniform and on Horse's, it would have been a lot better.

    May - August: The changing of the guard and Military Band daily at 12.15 hours (Sundays and holidays at 1.15pm). In the summer season, you may even see guards on horses approaching Stockholm's Royal Palace (especially in May)!

    April, September, October: The Swedish changing of the guards can be seen Wednesdays & Saturdays at 12.15 hours, and Sundays at 1.15 pm.
    Around April 30th - the King's birthday - look for horse displays as well.

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    The Royal Palace

    by sim1 Updated Mar 25, 2007

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    Guards at the The Royal Palace
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    In the wintertime there is not that much to see and do outside the Royal Palace, except for a few guards. Hahaha, so of course they were the obvious target for my camera :-)))

    In the second picture you can see another winter scene at the Royal Palace. But in the wintertime you shouldn't be outside the Palace, it is inside where you need to be. There is a lot to see there! You can take a tour through the Royal Apartments, visit the Tre Kronor Museum, The Treasury and the Gustav III's Museum of Antiquities.

    A combination ticket to visit the castle, Skattkammaren and the Museum Tre Kronor will cost you 130 SEK (Children and students 65 SEK). The entrance fee for the separate parts will cost you 90 SEK each and 35 SEK for children and students. Children aged under 7 admission free. The combination ticket is valid for 30 days.

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