Skansen, Stockholm

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  • The Sami Camp, Skansen, Stockholm
    The Sami Camp, Skansen, Stockholm
    by SurfaceTravel
  • Old time Milk Can
    Old time Milk Can
    by balhannah
  • Skogaholm Manor
    Skogaholm Manor
    by balhannah
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    Swedish Open-Air Folk Museum

    by travelfrosch Updated Feb 5, 2014

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    Sara getting in touch with her
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    18th and 19th Century buildings from all around Sweden were moved to this museum and preserved. Museum employees play the roles of various townspeople from the appropriate time, explaining what typical Swedish life was like at that time.

    In addition to the folk museum, there is an extensive petting zoo, as well as botanical gardens. If you're waiting for your overnight boat to depart (as we were), this is a great place to spend several hours.

    In 2009, Admission is SEK 70 for adults / SEK 30 for children through 29 April, SEK 90 / SEK 40 May and September, SEK 110/SEK 50 June-August. Extra admission is charged on Midsummer Eve and during evening music events. Finally, during May, the park offers a special evening admission (enter after 5PM) of SEK 40/SEK 20. Stockholm Card is valid. 50% discount on admission with a 72-hour public transport "Tourist Card" (NOT to be confused with Stockholm a la Carte or the SL Period Card).

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    Probably...

    by Henrik_rrb Updated Aug 6, 2012

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    Favourite animals

    ... my favourite place in Stockholm. This park is really nice, full of interesting things. To start with it has one part which is build in the way the "old" Sweden was built. Old houses and streets, with shops which shows how everything worked in Sweden 100 years ago. When we were there, in march, quite many of those houses were closed, but it was possible to see how they made glass, gold and iron. And then how a shop worked at that time.

    Then, the best place - the zoo! :) There is something with me that drags me to Zoos, all over the world.

    At Skansen there are a lot of animals, all of them swedish though. But still quite "new" for me, since most of them live up in the north, and I'm more often at the moon than I'm in the north of Sweden...

    There are bears, wolfs, eagles, foxes, elks and reindeers. And many many more animals, that I don't even have a clue about how to translate into english...

    Very nice it is anyway, and it's really easy to stroll around there for 3-4 hours.

    Summer is probably the best period to go there, since it's warmer. But also a lot more crowded with people...

    I had a really good time there in March, never having any trouble to see the animals.

    Skansen is open all year around, except for the 24th December. Although during the winter period quite many things in the park is closed, as restaurants, cafés and buildings in the "old" Sweden.

    The entrance fee depends on the season, but range between 50 and 100 SEK for adults (6-11 euro). Check out the www.skansen.se for opening hours and entrance fee.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 11 - THE GARDENS

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Skansen garden
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    When Skansen was founded in 1891, there already were trees, shrubs and flowers.

    The original idea, was for farms to be made look the same as where they had been moved from. Mountain birch trees were planted around the Sami camp and fir at Alvros farm from Harjedalen, just to give you an idea.

    They even have a Butterfly garden, where special plants attract Butterflies.

    I really liked the Parterre Rose garden, spread out over 16 blocks on the terrace between Sagaliden and Sweden's gazebo.
    The location of the Rose Garden was laid out by shipowner John Burgman in the early 1800's.
    He cultivated not only roses, but also pineapple, peach and grape vines.

    From the Terrace, there are good views over Stockholm.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 12

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Skansen Village
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    Skansen Open village has a lot more to see and offer than I have written about.
    I spent quite a bit of time here, but really you need at least a half to a full day to see everything.

    I visited on a weekday and was surprised to see the people at the Village in traditional costumes. On weekends, I imagine that would be when the Village is alive with all the tin smiths, leather worker's etc., going about their trades.
    All the shops would be open, not just some like when I was there.

    I saw the Animals and other buildings, but there still were a lot more to see. I saw different windmills and how they fenced years ago.

    It really was a very interesting, well done Village.

    This concludes my tour, I hope you enjoyed it and will go and see for yourself.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 10 - OLD TIME SHOP'S

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Old time store
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    An Open Air Village always has to have some old time shops!

    In this village, there are the ones that sell ice-creams and souvenirs, set in old buildings, but modern inside.
    Then there is the other type, the old building, with the old interior, and what is for sale in the shop is as it was a long time ago. You don't buy, you just look and reminisce how it was in the
    "good old days!"

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    SKANSEN - THE FUNICULAR

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Skansen Funicular Railway
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    I entered Skansen through the Hazelius gate. It's from this gateway, the funicular railway runs.
    As I already knew I had a lot of walking to do, I went up the hill by Funicular and I walked back down at the end of my day.
    This Funicular was built at the Stockholm exhibition in 1897. The funicular re-opened in 1973 with safety enhanced and with a longer route.
    The funicular starts at the Hazelius Entrance and stops at Tingswallen near Bollnas square and the Delsbo farm. It probably is the best way for people with a stroller or wheelchair.
    It is driverless and takes off at a certain time.

    Please check the website for operating times, as it begins operation at 10am each day, but finishes at different time's throughout the year.

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    SKANSEN OPEN AIR MUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    I always like the Open Air Villages, so when I knew this one was here in Stockholm, I just had to go and visit.
    Skansen, the oldest open-air museum in the world is in the beautiful location of Royal Djurgarden.

    At Skansen, it's a chance to see and learn about traditional crafts and traditions of Sweden. This is like visiting historic Sweden in miniature!
    There are 150 farms and dwellings from different parts of the country, all were disassembled and transported here. Some of the sights I saw were glass blowing, pottery, a tinsmiths workshop and a bakery, a gold-colored manor house, the Skogaholm manor house, the beautiful 18th century Seglora wooden church, and many Animal's, including moose, bears, lynxes, wolves, wolverines and seals. There is also a terrarium, a monkey house and a children’s zoo.

    I wasn't here for Christmas, but if you are, you may want to come to Skansen for the Christmas market, traditional Swedish julbord (Christmas buffet) and maybe snow.

    ADMISSION IN 2012...
    Adults: SEK 70-120
    Children (6-15 yrs): SEK 30-50.
    free with Stockholm card.

    For opening times, most days are from 10am to.......
    It depends on the season to what time Skansen closes, so please check the website.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 6 - HORNBORGA COTTAGE

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Hornborga Cottage

    This cottage comes from the village of that name in Vastergorland.
    The cottage was different to others in the Village, in that the wall's were built with giant boulders.
    There was an L- shaped, thatched roof home, a cow-shed and a Barn.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 9 - BOBERG'S OBSERVATORY

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Boberg's Observatory

    On the Solliden plane there is a small, octagonal observatory crowned with a dome, known as Boberg's Observatory. Designed by Stockholm architect Ferdinand Boberg, it was built in 1910.
    The orbits of the planets in the solar system have been laid out in rings round the building to give it an appropriate setting.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 8 - SKOGAHOLM MANOR

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    The Skogaholm Manor shows what a manor house in central Sweden might look like at the end of the 18th century.
    There is the main house with wings and pavilions grouped around a yard and encompassed by a fence.
    The Manor house, was the first house that I had come across that wasn't made out of wood.
    As I entered through the front door, I could hear music coming from one of the room's.
    What a nice touch to make this house authentic, for there in the Living Room were three Ladies dressed in period costume and playing string instrument's, nice!
    I sat and listened for awhile, then went for a walk through the house, finding this one was definitely more upmarket than the others! Still painted woodwork everywhere in the house, a custom of old time Sweden.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 7 - SEGLORA CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Seglora Church
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    Built in 1729, the Seglora Church is entirely built of timber. The Church was moved from the parish in Vastergotland in 1916, to its new home in Skansen.
    The church was built of local materials, with both the roof and the walls lined with oak shingles on the outside which are painted with a mixture of tar and traditional red paint.

    Up until the tower was built in the 1780's, the bells hung in a separate belfry. The barrel-vaulted ceiling was painted in 1735. Starting in the chancel one can follow scenes from the life of Jesus arranged clockwise round the ceiling. In the middle of the roof is the symbol of God’s all-seeing eye: a pink triangle bearing the name Yahweh in Hebrew letters. I thought the painting's to be in fairly good condition for a Church this old.
    The organ is from 1770.

    Interesting is the fact each farm had its own pews in the church. Women and men sat on opposite sides of the aisle; women to the left and men to the right. This custom lived on in the countryside into the 20th century.

    You wouldn't DARE FALL ASLEEP!
    Hanging in the porch is a long rod that the verger used for waking parishioners who fell asleep during the sermon.

    In the Church yard are three gravestones from Seglora, and four crosses from Rackeby church in Vastergotland, but there are no actual graves.

    This is a popular church for Stockholm weddings, as well as christenings and confirmations.

    Seglora Church is open every Sunday and for a great part of the summer season.
    Services are held in the church on some Sundays and feast days and concerts are also held there.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 5 - OKTORP FARMSTEAD

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    The Oktorp Farmstead comes from Halland and was moved to Skansen in 1896. it's quite a large farm with many thatched roofed farm building's. What looked to be Stable's surround quite a big open, cobblestoned yard.
    The Oktorp Farmstead was the first farm to be erected in the Village in its entirety. It shows what a farmstead in the flat countryside in Halland looked like in the 1870s, when the Lundqvist family, Ake and Christina and their daughter Hanna, aunt Beata, grandmother Ingeborg and their two farm-hands lived there.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 4 - BREDABLICK TOWER

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Bredablick

    The Bredablick, is a 30 metre high tower, built of brick, in the north-eastern area of Skansen. It is described as a gothic tower, has five floors and a viewing platform 77 meters above sea level. .
    The Tower was renovated in the 1980's and now has a cafe and a viewing floor at the top of the tower.
    The Tower wasn't moved to this site, but was built here in 1874-76.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 3 - HOME-MADE FOOD

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Skansen
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    The next homestead I came across had two Ladie's looking after the House.
    One was busy doing the dishes, and the other was inside busily cooking some traditional cake.
    Golly, it was a hot day, and it was extra hot in the wooden home with the open fire.
    I was offered some cake which I tried and thought nice.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 2 - SAMI CAMP

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Sami Camp
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    Next, I walked onto the Sami Camp which is an autumn and spring camp for the mountain Sami. It shows how the mountain Sami lived at the beginning of the 20th century when they still followed a nomadic existence, moving about with their reindeer.
    The northern parts of Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia are home to a Sami population of more than 70.000 people.
    The Sami national day is celebrated on the 6 of February with music, speeches and souvas - a savoury dish of reindeer meat and other things....At sami camp, Skansen.

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