Skansen, Stockholm

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  • The Sami Camp, Skansen, Stockholm
    The Sami Camp, Skansen, Stockholm
    by SurfaceTravel
  • Painting's in Seglora Church
    Painting's in Seglora Church
    by balhannah
  • Skansen Village
    Skansen Village
    by balhannah
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    SKANSEN - THE FUNICULAR

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Skansen Funicular Railway
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    I entered Skansen through the Hazelius gate. It's from this gateway, the funicular railway runs.
    As I already knew I had a lot of walking to do, I went up the hill by Funicular and I walked back down at the end of my day.
    This Funicular was built at the Stockholm exhibition in 1897. The funicular re-opened in 1973 with safety enhanced and with a longer route.
    The funicular starts at the Hazelius Entrance and stops at Tingswallen near Bollnas square and the Delsbo farm. It probably is the best way for people with a stroller or wheelchair.
    It is driverless and takes off at a certain time.

    Please check the website for operating times, as it begins operation at 10am each day, but finishes at different time's throughout the year.

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    Buildings from the past at Skansen

    by vec Written Nov 8, 2003

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    An old bankhouse

    At Skansen on Djurgården you will find buildings and houses form past times. Both buildings like this old bank house to whole farms with animals and people working, just like it used to look like in the old Sweden.

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    Skansen

    by magor65 Written Sep 14, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    elk in Skansen ZOO

    Skansen houses also a ZOO with nordic animals: elks, seals, wolves and bears, including three orphaned little brown bears whose mother was killed by a train in Finland. The information like that helps me believe that perhaps keeping animals in captivity isn't always so pointless...

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 1 - DELSBO FARMSTEAD

    by balhannah Written Feb 5, 2012

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    Inside Delsbo homestead
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    Please join me on a walk around the Village

    As I walked around the Village, I found that each house or farm belonged to a different area, which had different culture and tradition's.

    The Delsbo Farmstead was the first I came across. These building's came from north-central Sweden and it's made up of four building's surrounding a courtyard. The setting represents a large, prosperous farm in the mid-19th century.
    I was invited inside by the Lord & Lady of the House, both dressed in traditional clothes.
    They spoke English so I was able to find out a little about the home, and the richly decorated wall paintings.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 2 - SAMI CAMP

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Sami Camp
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    Next, I walked onto the Sami Camp which is an autumn and spring camp for the mountain Sami. It shows how the mountain Sami lived at the beginning of the 20th century when they still followed a nomadic existence, moving about with their reindeer.
    The northern parts of Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia are home to a Sami population of more than 70.000 people.
    The Sami national day is celebrated on the 6 of February with music, speeches and souvas - a savoury dish of reindeer meat and other things....At sami camp, Skansen.

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    Nordic animals at Skansen

    by vec Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Wolverine at Skansen

    If you don't get the chance to see some of the real Swedish wildlife, make sure that you at least visit Skansen at Djurgarden.

    Skansen is a kind of open air museum combined with a zoological park. Here you can see all kinds of typical building and activities from the past Sweden. You also find all the typical Nordic animals, like reindeers, wolverines, lynx and elks.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 4 - BREDABLICK TOWER

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Bredablick

    The Bredablick, is a 30 metre high tower, built of brick, in the north-eastern area of Skansen. It is described as a gothic tower, has five floors and a viewing platform 77 meters above sea level. .
    The Tower was renovated in the 1980's and now has a cafe and a viewing floor at the top of the tower.
    The Tower wasn't moved to this site, but was built here in 1874-76.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 5 - OKTORP FARMSTEAD

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    The Oktorp Farmstead comes from Halland and was moved to Skansen in 1896. it's quite a large farm with many thatched roofed farm building's. What looked to be Stable's surround quite a big open, cobblestoned yard.
    The Oktorp Farmstead was the first farm to be erected in the Village in its entirety. It shows what a farmstead in the flat countryside in Halland looked like in the 1870s, when the Lundqvist family, Ake and Christina and their daughter Hanna, aunt Beata, grandmother Ingeborg and their two farm-hands lived there.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 6 - HORNBORGA COTTAGE

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Hornborga Cottage

    This cottage comes from the village of that name in Vastergorland.
    The cottage was different to others in the Village, in that the wall's were built with giant boulders.
    There was an L- shaped, thatched roof home, a cow-shed and a Barn.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 10 - OLD TIME SHOP'S

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Old time store
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    An Open Air Village always has to have some old time shops!

    In this village, there are the ones that sell ice-creams and souvenirs, set in old buildings, but modern inside.
    Then there is the other type, the old building, with the old interior, and what is for sale in the shop is as it was a long time ago. You don't buy, you just look and reminisce how it was in the
    "good old days!"

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  • egyptiandiamond's Profile Photo

    Skansen

    by egyptiandiamond Written Sep 2, 2006

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    its anOpen-air museum, the oldest in the world, founded in 1891, combined with a zoological park and an aquarium.

    it shows old Swedish architecture and lifestyles along with for example the Saami Culture and houses. All through the last century Skansen people travelled around the whole country, buying entire buildings and transporting them down to Stockholm.

    For tourists to see and for the preservation of history.There is certainly a lot to be said about how cultural heritage in this way was taken away from their original surroundings, but done is done I guess, and surely some of the buildings wouldnt be in such a great shape today, had they stayed where they once stood.

    (One farm that Skansen was interested in, but didnt get, was the farm Ystergårn in Hillsta west of Hudiksvall. This farm has been preserved on its original site, and if you travel by the county of Hälsingland, take the opportunity to visit this place. See my Hudiksvall page for more info on this!)

    On the major holidays, there are traditional celebrations going on in Skansen. And remember:this may be your one chance to actually see a moose! :-)

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    Swedish History

    by barryg23 Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    Me in Skansen Town Quarter

    Skansen is an open-air musem tracing over five cenuries of Swedish (and some Norweigan) history. Located in Djurgarden, one of the many islands which make up central Stockholm, Skansen is well worth visiting if you are interested in the culture and history of the ordinary Swedish people.

    The Town Quarter is probably the most interesting part of Skansen. Here you can see a typical 19th century Swedish town, full of traditional homes and crafts shops such as a glassblowers, bookbinders and metalworks. You can observe the craftsmen and women as they work and in most cases they are happy to talk to visitors.

    I was very tempted to buy something from the glassblowers gift shop, especially after seeing the glassblowers at work, but it was rather expensive.

    The zoo is also worth visting, in particular the section on Scandinavian animals where you can see reindeer, elk, lynx and bear.

    Entry to the park is 35 SEK and a guidebook with map is an extra 5 SEK.

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    Skansen

    by magor65 Written Sep 14, 2004

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    old church in Skansen

    This interesting wooden church comes from the first part of 18th century. Still today masses are held here on sundays and occasionally there are weddings and christenings. The old pews have latches, since in the past parishioners used to own their seats.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 3 - HOME-MADE FOOD

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Skansen
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    The next homestead I came across had two Ladie's looking after the House.
    One was busy doing the dishes, and the other was inside busily cooking some traditional cake.
    Golly, it was a hot day, and it was extra hot in the wooden home with the open fire.
    I was offered some cake which I tried and thought nice.

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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 8 - SKOGAHOLM MANOR

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    The Skogaholm Manor shows what a manor house in central Sweden might look like at the end of the 18th century.
    There is the main house with wings and pavilions grouped around a yard and encompassed by a fence.
    The Manor house, was the first house that I had come across that wasn't made out of wood.
    As I entered through the front door, I could hear music coming from one of the room's.
    What a nice touch to make this house authentic, for there in the Living Room were three Ladies dressed in period costume and playing string instrument's, nice!
    I sat and listened for awhile, then went for a walk through the house, finding this one was definitely more upmarket than the others! Still painted woodwork everywhere in the house, a custom of old time Sweden.

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