Skansen, Stockholm

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  • Moose
    Moose
    by TheAndos
  • Costumes at Skansen
    Costumes at Skansen
    by TheAndos
  • Skansen
    Skansen
    by TheAndos
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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 3 - HOME-MADE FOOD

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    The next homestead I came across had two Ladie's looking after the House.
    One was busy doing the dishes, and the other was inside busily cooking some traditional cake.
    Golly, it was a hot day, and it was extra hot in the wooden home with the open fire.
    I was offered some cake which I tried and thought nice.

    Skansen Skansen
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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 8 - SKOGAHOLM MANOR

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    The Skogaholm Manor shows what a manor house in central Sweden might look like at the end of the 18th century.
    There is the main house with wings and pavilions grouped around a yard and encompassed by a fence.
    The Manor house, was the first house that I had come across that wasn't made out of wood.
    As I entered through the front door, I could hear music coming from one of the room's.
    What a nice touch to make this house authentic, for there in the Living Room were three Ladies dressed in period costume and playing string instrument's, nice!
    I sat and listened for awhile, then went for a walk through the house, finding this one was definitely more upmarket than the others! Still painted woodwork everywhere in the house, a custom of old time Sweden.

    Skogaholm Manor Painted ceiling in Skogaholm Manor Period clothing Skogaholm Manor
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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 9 - BOBERG'S OBSERVATORY

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    On the Solliden plane there is a small, octagonal observatory crowned with a dome, known as Boberg's Observatory. Designed by Stockholm architect Ferdinand Boberg, it was built in 1910.
    The orbits of the planets in the solar system have been laid out in rings round the building to give it an appropriate setting.

    Boberg's Observatory
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    Skansen

    by egyptiandiamond Written Sep 2, 2006

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    its anOpen-air museum, the oldest in the world, founded in 1891, combined with a zoological park and an aquarium.

    it shows old Swedish architecture and lifestyles along with for example the Saami Culture and houses. All through the last century Skansen people travelled around the whole country, buying entire buildings and transporting them down to Stockholm.

    For tourists to see and for the preservation of history.There is certainly a lot to be said about how cultural heritage in this way was taken away from their original surroundings, but done is done I guess, and surely some of the buildings wouldnt be in such a great shape today, had they stayed where they once stood.

    (One farm that Skansen was interested in, but didnt get, was the farm Ystergårn in Hillsta west of Hudiksvall. This farm has been preserved on its original site, and if you travel by the county of Hälsingland, take the opportunity to visit this place. See my Hudiksvall page for more info on this!)

    On the major holidays, there are traditional celebrations going on in Skansen. And remember:this may be your one chance to actually see a moose! :-)

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    Swedish History

    by barryg23 Updated Jan 21, 2005

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    Skansen is an open-air musem tracing over five cenuries of Swedish (and some Norweigan) history. Located in Djurgarden, one of the many islands which make up central Stockholm, Skansen is well worth visiting if you are interested in the culture and history of the ordinary Swedish people.

    The Town Quarter is probably the most interesting part of Skansen. Here you can see a typical 19th century Swedish town, full of traditional homes and crafts shops such as a glassblowers, bookbinders and metalworks. You can observe the craftsmen and women as they work and in most cases they are happy to talk to visitors.

    I was very tempted to buy something from the glassblowers gift shop, especially after seeing the glassblowers at work, but it was rather expensive.

    The zoo is also worth visting, in particular the section on Scandinavian animals where you can see reindeer, elk, lynx and bear.

    Entry to the park is 35 SEK and a guidebook with map is an extra 5 SEK.

    Me in Skansen Town Quarter
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    Skansen

    by MalenaN Updated Jun 3, 2005

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    Skansen is an open-air museum and a zoo, which was founded already in 1891. Here you will find animals living in the wild in Sweden, like lynx, fox, elks and bears. But around the old farmhouses there are also domestic animals, like pigs, cows, horses, goats and rabbits. And don’t be too surprised if you will meet a peacock when you are walking around.
    Skansen is open every day of the year except Christmas Eve.

    The Elk Pontus
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    Skansen

    by magor65 Written Sep 14, 2004

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    This interesting wooden church comes from the first part of 18th century. Still today masses are held here on sundays and occasionally there are weddings and christenings. The old pews have latches, since in the past parishioners used to own their seats.

    old church in Skansen
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    Fåfängan

    by Dinken Written Jun 19, 2007

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    I saw a staircase and thought it would be nice to go up the hill and look at the city from there. There is a house there, and many benches, I think it should be nice in summer. I read this: "A defensive structure - a redout or skans - was built on this hill in the 1650s. There are still remains of a road for transporting cannon, built by Russian prisoners of war in 1710. The name Fåfängan (Vanity) comes from the wholesaler Fredrik Lundin's folly, the pavilion on the summit, built in the 1770s. The word fåfänge has been used in Sweden to denote infertile soil which is vain to try to cultivate, in Stockholm the word has taken on a special meaning, denoting a pavilion on a hill with an extensive view, where the owner sometimes assembled his friends for parties. There are several examples in Stockholm: Sabbatsberg, Skinnarviksberget and the Skansen Hill on Djurgården".

    Beautiful Swedish flag on the hill Here you can see this hill Climbing up :oP The view History :o)
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    SKANSEN VILLAGE - 7 - SEGLORA CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Feb 6, 2012

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    Built in 1729, the Seglora Church is entirely built of timber. The Church was moved from the parish in Vastergotland in 1916, to its new home in Skansen.
    The church was built of local materials, with both the roof and the walls lined with oak shingles on the outside which are painted with a mixture of tar and traditional red paint.

    Up until the tower was built in the 1780's, the bells hung in a separate belfry. The barrel-vaulted ceiling was painted in 1735. Starting in the chancel one can follow scenes from the life of Jesus arranged clockwise round the ceiling. In the middle of the roof is the symbol of God’s all-seeing eye: a pink triangle bearing the name Yahweh in Hebrew letters. I thought the painting's to be in fairly good condition for a Church this old.
    The organ is from 1770.

    Interesting is the fact each farm had its own pews in the church. Women and men sat on opposite sides of the aisle; women to the left and men to the right. This custom lived on in the countryside into the 20th century.

    You wouldn't DARE FALL ASLEEP!
    Hanging in the porch is a long rod that the verger used for waking parishioners who fell asleep during the sermon.

    In the Church yard are three gravestones from Seglora, and four crosses from Rackeby church in Vastergotland, but there are no actual graves.

    This is a popular church for Stockholm weddings, as well as christenings and confirmations.

    Seglora Church is open every Sunday and for a great part of the summer season.
    Services are held in the church on some Sundays and feast days and concerts are also held there.

    Seglora Church Inside Seglora Church Painting's in Seglora Church
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    Arriving at Skansen

    by hevbell Written Aug 31, 2009

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    There are two entrances to the park. We weren't sure where we were going and got off the bus at the Hazelius Gate [see pic] which is the first one you pass on the bus/tram, but the main entrance is further on, right across from Grona Lund. The entrance fee for adults is 110 SEK

    hazelius gate main entrance

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    Skansen

    by hevbell Updated Aug 31, 2009

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    Our first day was spent at this outdoor museum on Djurgarden. I LOVED it! So much to see and do there so if you get a good sunny day like we did, you can really spend a whole day just exploring. There are 150 buildings in the park that show how both landowners and peasants would have lived with traditional crafts, and native flora & fauna. Definitely a fab place for a day out

    skansen

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    Skansen

    by SheDragon Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Skansen is a mix of history and animals. You can see demonstrations in the glass-blowers' hut, see what life was like in different times, see historical buildings from all over Sweden, or just check out the animals. Personally, I went to see the moose. Also, during the summer, on Tuesday evenings, Skansen hosts a big communal singfest that lots of people seem to like to go to. I saw it on tv and it is quite a sight to see, even if you don't speak Swedish and have no idea what's going on. No matter what you're looking for in Swedish culture and history, Skansen has it. Like I said before, though, my favorite was the moose.

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    Skansen - Glassblowing

    by hevbell Updated Apr 24, 2011

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    In the village area one of the buildings has glass blowing demonstrations as well as a shop selling the stuff made there. There is a viewing area so you can sit and watch the glass blowers working away which was pretty interesting. Amazing how a blob on the end of a stick can turn into a beautiful glass or vase in a matter on minutes!! Definitely worth checking out. The only slight downside is that you are basically just watching them work, they don't actually explain what they are doing

    glass blowing

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    Skansen Funicular

    by hevbell Updated Apr 24, 2011

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    If, like us, you enter the park at the Hazelius Gate, there is a bit of a climb up into the park proper. If you want to take it a bit easier you can pay a little extra [I think it was around 25 SEK] to take the funicular up the hill

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    Skansen: Swedish Countryside

    by Pieter11 Written Feb 27, 2006

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    At the centre and the back of Skansen, you will leave the town of the park and enter the Swedish Countryside. Here you can see the majority of the more then 150 buildings that are moved to the park throughout the ages.

    In this part of the park you can enjoy a lot of beautiful villages, just like they excited at the end of the 19th century in Sweden. The first part will show you a lot of farms, that are very original in their interior and exterior. Cupboards inside as well as fences outside, are all perfectly matching with the buildings, and here again, the people in the houses are all dressed up traditionally.

    Just walking around you will see some windmills, and a watermill, that was used as a sawing factory. Close to here there is a beautiful stream with rocks and a trees covering it. Follow that stream upwards and you will end up at the village of the Samen people. These are the origininal inhabitants of the North of Scandinavia. Here you can see what a real wigwam looks like in their style. You will also meet some reigndeers, who are the beginning of the next part of Skansen, the Zoo.

    But first you can also visit the front of the part, with some beautiful countryside houses, where the more rich people lived in. Spacious houses, with nice gardens around it. Close to here you will see an old clocktower and a very special church. This church, in the centre of the park, used to stand in the north of Sweden, but was moved here and was rebuilt piece by piece.

    Windmills in Skansen House in Skansen House in Skansen Church in Skansen Pieter11 in Skansen
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