Stadshuset - City Hall, Stockholm

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    City Hall

    by HORSCHECK Updated Dec 7, 2013

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    City Hall (Stadshuset)
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    Stockholm's City Hall (Stadshuset) is an imposing red brick building with an inner court and a 100 m tall tower. It was was built between 1911-1923 to the design of architect Ragnar Ostberg. The City Hall is home to the rooms where the Nobel Prize festivities take place.

    Directions:
    The City Hall is located at the eastern end of Kungsholmen, which is one of the main islands in Stockholm's city centre. The nearest Metro stops (T-bana) are "T-Centralen" and "Radhuset".

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  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Stockholm city Hall/Stadshuset

    by yvgr Updated Apr 22, 2012
    Stadshuset

    Stockholm City Hall (Swedish: Stockholms stadshus or Stadshuset locally) is the building of the Municipal Council for the City of Stockholm in Sweden. It stands on the eastern tip of Kungsholmen island, next to Riddarfjärden's northern shore and facing the islands of Riddarholmen and Södermalm. It is the venue of the Nobel Prize banquet and one of Stockholm's major tourist attractions.

    Usually a very crowded space on a beautiful summer day. You can also go up into the Tower of stadshuset.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    CITY HALL

    by balhannah Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    Dark tower of City Hall
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    The City Hall Tower, which feature's three Crown's, I could see from many places on my walk.
    I found out that it is one of the most visited landmarks and each year almost half a million people visit this famous building, often photographing its red-brick facade reflecting into the adjacent calm waterfront.
    Unlucky for me, it was an overcast day, with some wind, so no pretty reflection photo's!
    The three crowns on the Tower, is the Swedish national coat of arms.

    The great Nobel banquet is also held in City Hall. After dinner, Nobel Prize recipients, royalty and guests dance in the Golden Hall, with its 18 million gold mosaic tiles.
    Would be worth seeing if you have time.

    The City Hall is open to the public through guided tours all year round.
    ADMISSION IN 2011...
    Adults: SEK 60-90....Children (12-17 yrs): SEK 20-40.... Stockholm card ...free

    During the same period you can also climb up inside the tower and enjoy a fantastic view over the city. Tours can be canceled with short notice due to events.

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Home to Nobel prize ceremonies and more

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 5, 2011

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    City Hall as seen from Riddarholmen

    The Stockholm City Hall has a solid claim to fame -- it is where the Nobel Prize banquet is held every year. That alone makes it an object of curiosity, but the Blue Hall, where the banquet takes place, is actually one of the plainest rooms in the building. The other sections are extremely interesting and are definitely worth the visit. The City Hall was influenced by many architectural styles, which are reflected in unexpected ways both inside and outside. I have yet to see another building like it.

    The City Hall can only be visited on a guided tour. The tours take place ever hour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. most of the year, with increased frequency (every half-hour) during the summer months. The cost is SEK 90 (free with the Stockholm Card). I recommend showing up early in the morning to ask when the next available tour will take place and then taking in the beautiful waterfront views from the City Hall gardens while waiting for the tour to start.

    The City Hall tower can also be visited in summer. You must book your visit in advance. While the views from the top of the tower are truly breathtaking, visits are timed closely: if you spend too much time looking at the statues in the tower museum halfway to the top, you won't have much time left for the viewing platform at the top. A visit up the tower costs SEK 40.

    Another way to get into the tower is to get married at Stockholm City Hall: the ceremony takes 5 minutes and is offered free of charge to everyone! But this is where the similarities to a Las Vegas-style wedding end: you must book your time at least 6 months in advance, and if you are not a Swedish citizen, make sure to prepare the necessary documents ahead of time (as Canadians, we had to present a proof of absence of impediments to marriage that could only to be delivered by the Canadian embassy).

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Visiting Stadshuset, the City Hall of Stockholm

    by SurfaceTravel Written Aug 17, 2011
    View of Stadshuset from our hotel
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    Stadshuset is where they hold the Nobel Prize banquet and we got to walk down the stair case into the Blue Hall, just like the prize winners do. The Peace prize is presented in Oslo, but the rest are presented in Stockholm: Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Literature, and Economics.

    You can only visit as part of a guided tour, but no advance booking is required. There are 45-minute tours in English daily at 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 all year round; July and August tours in English are available every 30 minutes between 09.30 and 16.00. You should check in advance of visiting, as there could be cancellations due to events. There are also tours in other languages.

    It's well worth a visit alone or with the family.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Stadshuset (City Hall)

    by spidermiss Updated May 21, 2011

    One afternoon during my Stockholm stay I visited the City Hall where I climbed up 106 m (347 ft) tower for the great views of Stockholm. It was free admittance with my Stockholm Card but it would usually cost 40 SEK (May 2011)

    The City Hall designed by Ragnar Ostberg and opened in 1923. The tower has three crown which represents the Swedish national coat of arms. The City Hall houses Stockholm's Municipal Council and a lot of high profile events such as the Nobel banquets are held there. Guided tours are available at certain times through out the year for those who want to look round the City Hall. The tower is open in the summer months for those who want to climb for the views.

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    Big and Brown with Golden Crown(s)

    by kanjon Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    outdoor court City Hall

    The City Hall must be one of the prettier office-buildings in Stockholm, working-space for both politicians and civil-servants. There are lots of art and fantastic objects and furnishings everywhere. I have tended some meetings here, in awesome environment, big, old paintings and carpets and enormous heavy, wooden tables and chairs.

    Famous eclectic ”National romantic” architecture by Swedish architect-icon Ragnar Östberg (1866-1945). The building was inaugerated in Midsummers-eve 1923. In the work, Östberg was inspired by Palazzo Ducale in Venice and Byzantine style mosaic. Ragnar Östberg has, among other buildings, also drawn The Stockholm Maritime Museum, the school Östra real at Östermalm and the sculptor Carl Eldhs studio-museum in the Bellevue-park.

    The City Hall building houses the famous Nobel Banquet in the Blue Hall, which isn´t blue at all, but brick-coloured red (the architect changed plans about the colour after the working-name Blue Hall was established). The impressive Golden Hall is designed by artist Einar Forseth who also made a beautiful gold mosaic+fresco crypt in Högalidskyrkan.


    There are daily tours (check out the view from the tower!) at 10:00am and 12:00 noon for individuals with no advance reservation (max 9 participants), sometimes more frequent. For tour-information call+46-8-508 29 058 or +46-8-508 29 059.

    For those who want to stroll outdoors, the Stockholm City Hall is an excellent start on a promenade by the water. Just continue on the embankment either towards the city centre, or, my choice, the other way, through a winding path with lots of bridges, cafés and people. From the quay outside the City Hall “Stadshuskajen”, you can jump on a steamboat to Drottningholm and other places. Very nice!

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  • t_cims's Profile Photo

    The City Hall

    by t_cims Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The City Hall of Stockholm is one of the most beautiful and well known buildings in the world and the most exclusive ballroom in Stockholm, frequently used for e.g. the yearly Nobel Banquet. Behind the brick walls, several different activities take place.

    The City Hall is known for its hospitality, its unique art treasures, magnificent banquettes and an intriguing history attracting close to 400,000 visitors a year.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    the stadshuset

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    cenotaph of birger jarl

    the stadshuset, (city hall) is a large red brick building in cental stockholm. built in 1923 it is home to the noble prize ceremonies. there are guided tours of the stadshuset or you can go up to the top of the tower for an excellent view of gamla stan and the central city. pictured is the cenotaph of king birger jarl, a 13th century king of sweden.

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    The City Hall Tower

    by gordonilla Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    View over Gamla Stan from the City Hall Tower
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    The City hall Tower measures 106 metres (some 350 feet) and is actuallt constructed using in the region of 2.5 million bricks and it weighs in the region of 24,000 tons.

    There are 365 steps which lead to the top of the tower, or for the less fit there is a lift available up to the museum floor of the tower.

    There are three Crowns adorning the top of the tower, they measure 2.2 metres in diameter and are pointing in the direction of the old Royal Palace of the Three Crowns (Tre Krone)

    The tower is open between May and September ( between 10.00 - 16.30)

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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Stadshuset (City Hall)

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Stadshuset (City Hall)
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    It's time to visit the Stadshuset (The City Hall), one of the highlights of my visit to Stockholm. Stockholm's City Hall was built between 1911-1923 and was designed by architect Ragnar Östberg. It is one of Sweden's foremost buildings in the National Romantic style. I think most of you might recognize the building as it is often used as a symbol for the city of Stockholm. Maybe the outside is characteristic and beautiful to see, but wait until you get inside! The architecture is simply amazing and breathtaking at times!
    I have quite a few pictures of the Stadshuset on this page as I loved the tour so much. I hope you won't be bored by them, but that you will enjoy my virtual tour through the Stadshuset, and maybe I can convince you to go here yourself when you are visiting Stockholm.

    On the extra photos to this tip you can see some details and views from the outside of the stadshuset:
    In the first extra picture you can see one of the two sculptures at the waterside called Dansen by Carl Eldh. Further on you can see an ornamental clock and the Monument to Birger Jarl.


    You can find more detailed information about the Stadshuset and its surrounding area on my Barnhusviken page

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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    The "Blue Hall" in the Stadshuset

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The


    The Stadshuset is built with 8 million bricks and behind the imposing facades there are offices, meeting rooms and banquet halls. The guided tour will lead you through part of the building.

    The architect Ragnar Östberg was inspired by the palaces of the Renaissance and had the City Hall built around two squares or "piazzas", Borgargården and the Blue Hall. This "Blue Hall" (see picture), is the starting point of the guided tour.

    The feeling to stand here was really amazing, for a moment it was almost like I was in Italy on a beautiful square. The whole hall just has that atmosphere, and I loved it. The hall is huge, too big to capture in one photo, so you can see only a part of it. The ceiling is very high and there is lots of glass on top to let in a lot of daylight, making it feel like a real square instead of a hall inside a building. In the Blue Hall you will also find one of Northern Europe's largest organs with over 10,000 pipes and 138 stops.

    The Blue Hall, which is the building's largest hall, is famous for the Nobel Prize Banquet which takes place here every year on the 10th of December.


    You can find more detailed information about the Stadshuset and its surrounding area on my Barnhusviken page

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    The "Blue Hall" in the Stadshuset

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Inside the
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    You maybe wonder by now why it is called the Blue Hall, as it doesn't appear to be blue at all. In the original plans of the Stadshuset the Blue Hall was supposed to be painted blue, but the architect changed his mind. When he saw the beautiful red bricks, he did not want to cover them with blue plaster. And I think he made a good decision, as the Blue Hall looks fabulous the way it is. The reason that the name Blue Hall was kept for this beautiful room was a practical one. The name was found on all the plans of the building, and everyone knew the room by now as the "Blue Hall".


    You can find more detailed information about the Stadshuset and its surrounding area on my Barnhusviken page

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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Ceiling of the Council Chamber

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ceiling of the Council Chamber, Stadshuset


    The part of the Council Room that I really loved was its ceiling. The ceiling is beautiful and it gives you the impression of being in a Viking long-house instead of being in a Council Room. The colours are great, and the ceiling itself is so high! The effect of the beams together with the paint effect make this feeling even stronger. I have no clue how high the ceiling is, but it seemed like at least 10 metres to me.


    You can find more detailed information about the Stadshuset and its surrounding area on my Barnhusviken page

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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    The "Golden Hall" in the Stadshuset

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The
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    I guess they left the best and the most spectacular part of the tour for last; it's time to see the GOLDEN Hall! This room will without a doubt trigger lots of ooooh's and aaah's! It is an amazing room to enter into, the gold glitters everywhere, and your eyes need some time to get used to this luscious display of gold and decorations.

    The glow of the room is warm because of the golden colour and the nice soft lighting. And the design is nothing I have seen before, with mosaics covering all sides of the room, not a spot is being left uncovered. I don't know if I can the "Golden Hall" breathtakingly beautiful, but amazing and spectacular it is for sure!!! The Golden Hall contains the amazing amount of over 18,000,000 mosaic pieces, all made of glass or gold.

    Being in this room, you almost forget about the purpose of it. The hall is a banquet hall and has room for up to 700 people to sit down. The Hall is dominated by the "Queen of the lake Mälaren" on the northern wall. On the left and the right side of this huge mosaic, there are scenes from the East and the West. It is just amazing to see how a huge mosaic like this was made out of tiny pieces of glass and gold.

    Taking pictures in the Golden Hall isn't so easy. You're allowed to use a flash, but the flashlight will reflect against the golden surface and give annoying bright spots. Without the flash the room is too dark, and the picture will get blurry. So a steady hand is handy for taking pictures in the Golden Hall. Hahaha, the best remedy is to take lots of pictures! Some will turn out good for sure :-)


    You can find more detailed information about the Stadshuset and its surrounding area on my Barnhusviken page

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