Stadshuset - City Hall, Stockholm

4.5 out of 5 stars 115 Reviews

Hantverkargatan 1 +46 8 508 290 58

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    Song Statue in front of the City Hall
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  • Erkmen's Profile Photo

    City hall

    by Erkmen Updated May 20, 2003

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    Vist City hall.. And also If you catch the sun like we do, have some rest in the beatiful colorful garden and look at this red building covered with all those wonderful trees..

    The buillding was built in 1923 and millions of bricks has been used..

    city hall

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  • Marionbcn's Profile Photo

    THE CITY HALL

    by Marionbcn Written Apr 11, 2003

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    Stockholm's City Hall was built between 1911-1923 to the design of architect Ragnar Östberg. It is one of Sweden's foremost buildings in the National Romantic style. Behind the imposing facades, built with 8 million bricks are found offices, meeting rooms and banquetting halls. Inspired by the palaces of the Renaissance, Ragnar Östberg had the City Hall built around two squares or "piazzas", Borgargården and the Blue Hall.

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    On a day with nice weather you...

    by Fiffi Written Feb 25, 2003

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    On a day with nice weather you MUST go to the city hall 'Stadshuset' and go up the tower (picture)! It's cheap and gives you a nice view of the city. The building itself is truly amazing and well worth a tour.
    Another MUST in Stockholm is taking a boat out in the archipelago. There are several sight seeing boats, but if you want to join the natives (on their way to their summer houses) you should go to 'Grand Hotel'. Right outside there is a little stand where you can get information. In summer there are usually several boats waiting to take off. You buy the ticket on the boat (save ticket until you get off the boat!).
    Taking the boat out with other citypeople on their way to their summer homes, is more fun than being put on a fast sight seeing boat with other tourists an kick-offs for companies. And it's much cheaper! When you get on the boat, a tip is to find the deck as soon as possible and grab a seat! You can also get a pass and go island hopping for a few days. There are youth hostels on several islands.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Guided Tour in Stadshuset

    by Kathrin_E Updated Oct 13, 2014

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    The interior of Stadshuset can be visited with guided tours only. It was not on your group's schedule but I really wished to see it, so I went by myself in the last morning. Although Stadshuset is a busy tourist hotspot with bus and cruise groups in addition to the individuals' tours, and tours move rather fast, you get to see all the important halls and rooms. Most of them are vast enough to provide enough space for two or three groups at once. I do not regret going. It's worth it.

    Guided tours are available in Swedish and English. There is no prebooking except for large groups, tickets for individuals are sold on the day itself at the cash desk. Hours and intervals differ depending on the time of year and are subject to change if there are events taking place in Stadshuset. Please check the official website for all details concerning your exact date of visit: http://international.stockholm.se/the-city-hall/tours-of-the-city-hall/

    The tours start in the so-called Blue Hall (photo 1 and 2). There is nothing blue in the Blue Hall, though. The walls were actually supposed to be covered in blue tiles but when the architect saw the brick walls in their various shades of colour he liked them so much that he decided to leave them the way they were.
    Upstairs you are lead through some representative rooms and corridors into the hall of the city council (photo 3).
    The Prince's Gallery (photot 4) was named after Prince Eugen, the painter who created the frescoes on the wall that depict views of Stockholm's various islands.
    The most impressive interior is the Golden Hall (photo 5) with its gold mosaics. Simply fantastic. The picture on the front wall shows the Queen of Lake Mälar with the city of Stockholm in her lap. Further pictures show personalities and events from Swedish history. Details of the mosaics in the Golden Hall can be viewed here: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/tt/ca56c/

    Additional photos of the interior that did not fit into this tip are here: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/tt/ca658/

    Blue Hall Council hall Prince's Gallery Golden Hall
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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Home to Nobel prize ceremonies and more

    by brazwhazz Written Dec 5, 2011

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    The Stockholm City Hall has a solid claim to fame -- it is where the Nobel Prize banquet is held every year. That alone makes it an object of curiosity, but the Blue Hall, where the banquet takes place, is actually one of the plainest rooms in the building. The other sections are extremely interesting and are definitely worth the visit. The City Hall was influenced by many architectural styles, which are reflected in unexpected ways both inside and outside. I have yet to see another building like it.

    The City Hall can only be visited on a guided tour. The tours take place ever hour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. most of the year, with increased frequency (every half-hour) during the summer months. The cost is SEK 90 (free with the Stockholm Card). I recommend showing up early in the morning to ask when the next available tour will take place and then taking in the beautiful waterfront views from the City Hall gardens while waiting for the tour to start.

    The City Hall tower can also be visited in summer. You must book your visit in advance. While the views from the top of the tower are truly breathtaking, visits are timed closely: if you spend too much time looking at the statues in the tower museum halfway to the top, you won't have much time left for the viewing platform at the top. A visit up the tower costs SEK 40.

    Another way to get into the tower is to get married at Stockholm City Hall: the ceremony takes 5 minutes and is offered free of charge to everyone! But this is where the similarities to a Las Vegas-style wedding end: you must book your time at least 6 months in advance, and if you are not a Swedish citizen, make sure to prepare the necessary documents ahead of time (as Canadians, we had to present a proof of absence of impediments to marriage that could only to be delivered by the Canadian embassy).

    City Hall as seen from Riddarholmen
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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Stadshuset

    by tini58de Written May 13, 2006

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    The history of the City Hall is the history of an architect who could not make up his mind! It was designed by an architect named Ragnar Östberg in 1911-1923. Apparently this man changed his views and ideas quite often during these years so that a lot of changes occurred during the time of construction. For instance the "Blue Hall" is made of red brick - and red brick only, because Mr. Östberg decided that the red brick was so beautiful that he did not want to cover it with blue plaster! Ha ha - but the name "BlueHall" remained.....

    Inspired by the palaces of the Renaissance, the architect had the Stadshuset (City Hall) built around two squares or "piazzas".

    It is possible to have a guided tour through the city hall, which we did not do, but if you want to save the 60 SKr entrance fee, why not go on a virtual tour of the Stadshuset?

    It is also possible to climb the tower and I am sure you have a fantastic view of Gamla Stan and Riddarholmen from the top!

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  • Maline's Profile Photo

    Stadshuset

    by Maline Updated Jun 16, 2003

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    The city council building is very close to the Central Station.

    It faces the water, and it looks in some ways similar to a church from certain angels, with a high tower and all. Speaking of the tower, it is actually 106 metres high, and open daily for visits from may to september... count on some good views!
    You can also enter the main building of course. There are several guidance tours, especially in summer but even the rest of the year.

    The building is not very old, in fact it was inaugurated only 80 years ago, in 1923. Supposedly 8 million bricks make up the brownish red facade.
    Especially beautiful is it when the sun hits the colden adornments on the roof... I passed a fine sunny spring day, and got some really nice pics...!

    Stadshuset in Stockholm

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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    The City Hall

    by jorgec25 Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Besides being an open balcony to the Baltic, the city hall deserves a visit to it's rich interiors.

    The highlight of the visit is to climb to the top of the city hall tower, and enjoying the stunning views over the Old Town and the nearby islands.

    The visits to the tower are limited to 35 minutes and around 30 people per visit. There are several visits during the whole day. It's possible to take a lift until halfway.

    City Hall City Hall View of Old Town View of Old Town
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  • parisanglo's Profile Photo

    The Nobel Prize City Hall

    by parisanglo Updated Mar 31, 2008

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    Stockholm City Hall (Stadshuset) is an impressive redbrick structure dating from the 1920s. It is situated on Kungsholmen island and the building is famous for hosting the annual Nobel Prize ceremony. The tower is 348 feet (106 metres) high. In the summer, from April to September, the tower itself is open to the public and the view from the top is quite beautiful. At the foot of the tower there is burial monument (cenotaph) dedicted to the founding father of the city of Stockholm - Birger Jarl. The cenotaph features a dazzling gold statue of a reclining Mr B.

    The Stadshuset The Stadshuset Tower The Stadshuset Courtyard An iconic figure (and behind him, a gold statue)!
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  • Pakistaniguy's Profile Photo

    City Hall

    by Pakistaniguy Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This city hall of Stockholm is very very special and famous becuase every year overhere the Noble Prize Awarding ceremony is organised. From far distance this Hall looks like an old Church but it is not ;-)

    City Hall of Stockholm
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  • Pieter11's Profile Photo

    Stadshuset

    by Pieter11 Written Mar 18, 2006

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    The City Hall of Stockholm, Stadshuset, was designed by the Swedish architect Ragnar Ostberg and was built between 1911 and 1923. The combinations of architectural styles is very typical: the shape of the building is based on Italian Renaissance "Palazzo"style. It has two innersquares inside the building that are surrounded by impressive high and simple walls, and all around the building there are walkways. But the Swedish influence is that all these Mediterranean shapes are built with very red bricks, 8 million of them were used.

    It is possible to climb the great tower at the corner of the building.This 106 metres tall construction offers you a magnificent view of the city. You can see all the islands with a close look of Riddarsholmen and Gamla Stan. To get here though, you have to climb the whole tower by foot, because there were no elevators in the beginning of the 20th century.

    At the top of the tower the symbol of Sweden is added: Tre Kronor, the Three Crowns. Just like the complete top of the tower, this is covered with gold.

    Inside the Stadshuset you can see several wealthy decorated official halls that are used for al kinds of events. Gold, mosaic, a huge organ and several sculptures decorate the building.

    Stadshuset Stadshuset seen from Riddarsholmen View from Stadshusets tower
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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    The modern city hall

    by Raimix Updated Mar 4, 2011

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    It is a modern city hall looking at other old towns. This red building was constructed in 1923. Maybe the outside view is not so beautiful, but it looks very differently inside with lot of decorations.

    Nobel winners are innaugurated at this town hall.

    This picture is cut from the postcard
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Stadshuset

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 9, 2014

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    Stadshuset, the city hall of Stockholm, is an impressive landmark on the northern bank of Riddarfjärden, overlooking the wide open water west of the old town. It is not as old as it tries to appear: The building was begun in 1911 and completed in 1924. Its style is known as “national romantic”, a style which is closely related to the arts and crafts movement. It combines elements of historical styles with the technical achievements of the early 20th century. All materials used are Swedish. 8 million bricks were needed for the facades.

    The tower is 106 metres high, one metre higher than the one of the city hall in Copenhagen – ah the chauvinism. The three gilded crowns on top refer to the coat of arms of the state.

    The facades are rich in details worth a closer look, like several balconies, small gilded statues on the edge of the roof, moon and star and palm leaf on top of the spires. More photos of some details are in this traveligue: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/tt/c922e/
    Outside the tower, underneath the canopy, there is a kenotaph (symbolic grave) for Birger Jarl, the founder of Stockholm, with a gilded statue of the defunct lying on top of the empty tomb.

    The main courtyard and the waterside terrace can be accessed for free. The interior of the city hall can only be visited with guided tours (see separate tip). I recommend joining one to see this remarkable building from inside.

    Courtyard Lakeside terrace Kenotaph for Birger Jarl
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  • wadekorzan's Profile Photo

    The octagonal room

    by wadekorzan Updated Feb 11, 2005

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    During your tour of the city hall, you will see this very small room called the "Octagonal Room". This is where civil weddings are held on Saturdays. I was told that up to 40 couples get married each Saturday here, and that they can have the long ceremony or the shor ceremony. The long ceremony only lasts for about 90 seconds! So imagine the short ceremony!

    It is also interesting to know the architectural story in this room, so take a good look at the picture of the chandelier, and then follow me to the next tip to hear the story.....

    Chandelier
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    The tapestries in the Octagonal room

    by wadekorzan Updated Feb 11, 2005

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    These tapestries hang on the walls of the Octagonal room in city hall, and are very precious works that made their way to Sweden from France. Eventually, the city hall got posession of them, but they had no proper room in which to display them. So, in the end, they actually built the Octogonal room specifically to accommodate the tapestries! Every detail in the tapestries has been taken into account when the room was built.

    If you look at the chandelier in the previous tip, you notice at the top something that resembles a small umbrella--now look at the photo of the tapestries and you' find that very same umbrella. Also the blue thing hanging down from the top of the chandelier is clear to see on the tapestries. The walls of the room have even been sculpted to match patterns represented in the tapestries.

    It's pretty amazing that they paid so much attention to detail when they built this room!

    Tapestry
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