Vasa Museum, Stockholm

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    The Vasa Museum

    by HORSCHECK Updated Dec 7, 2013

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    Inside the Vasa Museum
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    Although I am not that much interested in museums, I visited the famous Vasa Museum and I was very impressed. It is probably Scanadinavia's most visited museum.

    It houses the preserved warship Vasa that sank in 1628 and was risen in 1961. The museum has a kind of mysterious atmosphere as the wooden ship needs low light and moist conditions for maintainance. On several floors the museum has many interesting exhibitions including films and a slide show.

    Directions:
    The Vasa Museum is situated at the western end of the Djurgarden island.

    Website: http://www.vasamuseet.se/

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    The Vasa Museum

    by sim1 Updated Oct 26, 2013

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    I think I have to start this page with the most famous of the museums in Stockholm: The Vasa Museum. It is a real must see! And it is no wonder that it is Scandinavia's most visited museum.

    In the museum you can see the large warship Vasa. It is the only remaining and intact 17th century ship in the world. The wreck was salvaged in 1961 and now on display In the Vasa Museum. The ship is really impressive and you are able to walk around the ship so you can get a real good look at it. The lower rig has been rebuilt, complete with masts, stays and shrouds, making it a complete ship again. Surrounding the ship are several permanent exhibitions, cinemas, a shop and a restaurant.

    opening hours: (2013)
    Jun - Aug: daily 8:30 to 18:00
    Sep - May: 10:00 - 17:00; Wednesdays 10:00 to 20:00

    Closed: December 23-25 and 1st January. Limited opening hours on December 31 (10:00 - 15:00)

    Admission:
    Adults 130 SEK (on Wednesdays 1st Sep- 31st May 17:00 - 20:00 only 100 SEK-
    Students 100 SEK, Children, 0-18 yrs free

    Getting here:
    Take a walk, bus or ferry to the island of Djurgården. Buses 47 and 69 leave from the Central Station. Bus 44 from Karlaplan. The ferry leaves from Slussen all year round and also from Nybroplan during the summer.


    You can find more detailed information about the Vasa Museum and its surrounding area on my Djurgårdsbrunn page

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    Visit Vasa Museum

    by dplesko Updated Feb 7, 2012

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    Vasa museum is one of "Must see" places and displays the only almost fully intact 17th century ship that has ever been salvaged, the 64-gun warship Vasa that sank on her maiden voyage in 1628.

    The Vasa Museum opened in 1990 and, according to the official web site is the most visited museum in Scandinavia.

    Very interesting place where you may see one of the best preserved shipwrecks.

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    VASA MUSEUM - THE SHIP

    by balhannah Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Vasa Bow
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    We arrived at the Vasa Museum to find quite a long queue! It didn't take that long, and soon we were paying our admission fee and entering the Museum.

    It was a wow moment when we first saw the Ship, amazing! We just stood and looked, and then started doing our own tour of the museum.
    My 1st photo is what you see on entry, the Bow of the Ship and all the old carving's along either side.

    Then we walked around the back and had a look at the stern which has an amazing number of carving's of more people, quite spectacular, so much work had gone into this Ship!
    Where-ever we looked, there were carvings!

    It was easy to imagine how magnificent this Ship would have looked when it set sail on August 10th, 1628, on its maiden Voyage, and how devasted they must have felt when seeing it sail approx 1.5 kms, heel over and sink in the middle of Stockholm harbour.
    It's believed about 40 men, women and children died in this catastrophe.

    It is not expected the Vasa will not survive for ever, so if you are interested, I would make sure I go now before it is too late!

    It is an excellent Museum!

    ADMISSION IN 2012.....
    Adults 110 SEK ....Students 80 SEK (with valid student ID showing expiry date)
    Children and adolescents 0-18 years free of charge

    OPEN....
    1 June - 31 August DAILY 8.30 - 6pm
    1 September - 31 May DAILY 10.00-5PM
    Wednesdays 10.00- 8PM
    Closed: 1 January and 23-25 December

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    VASA MUSEUM - PERMANENT EXHIBITION'S

    by balhannah Written Feb 5, 2012

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    Vasa
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    Just don't expect to see the Vasa Ship and that is all in this Museum, there is much more than just that!
    There are many other exhibition's including how they are trying to save the Vasa.

    These exhibition's tell the story of the Vasa from start to finish and are very interesting!

    I really enjoyed viewing the Vasa sculptures. As they were underwater for so long, those on the hull of the Ship are a stained dark brown colour today

    Research shows they were coloured.
    After twelve years of examination, hundreds of microscopic fragments of colour have been analysed and interpreted and approx 50 key pieces of sculpture have been restored to show how they were originally painted.

    In the 17th century, ship decoration reached its greatest height.
    Sweden was sparsely populated and unknown, and for Gustav II Adolf with his ambitions for a great empire, it was important to show that we were as mighty as other countries. The Vasa’s sculptures would demonstrate a powerful nation with strong political and military resources

    The website listed below tells a lot more.

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    VASA MUSEUM - THE MODEL

    by balhannah Updated Feb 5, 2012

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    What a good idea at the Museum, is the painted moded of the Vasa done in a scale of 1:10.
    Now we know what the actual Ship looked like in all its glory!

    It took four model builders 12,000 hours to build. No wonder on the real ship, I thought there were an awful lot of sculpture's, in total, when the Ship was in one piece, there were over 500 sculptures.

    To begin with, the only parts painted were the canon-gun openings with their lion masks and the Vasa coat of arms, but after research, it has been painted in the original colour scheme, which has allowed a more precise interpretation of how the Vasa may have looked as she left port.

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Much greater in death than in life

    by brazwhazz Updated Dec 6, 2011

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    Aft view of Vasa

    To be honest, I had to get my ear pulled to visit the Vasa Museum (Vasamuseet). I mean, how interesting can the history of a ship that sank less than a nautical mile into its maiden voyage possibly be?

    To find out, take the excellent guided tour of the museum. There is obvious humour to be had with the Vasa's short period of service, and the guides don't shy away from it. They also offer very interesting insight into the recovery and conservation of the ship. Basically, the Vasa is an ongoing experiment in conservation techniques -- no one knows for sure how long it will continue to exist, despite all the steps taken to ensure its longevity.

    The Vasa Museum is said to be the most visited museum in Scandinavia, and now that I have been there, I can understand why. The only similar display in the world is the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth, England.

    The Vasa Museum is open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (8 p.m. on Wednesdays). Admission is SEK 110 for adults and free for children under 18 (and holders of the Stockholm Card).

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum

    by SurfaceTravel Written Aug 17, 2011
    Gun carriage, Vasa Museum, Djurg��rden
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    The Vasa warship sank in 1628 less than half a kilometre from its launch due to bad design: keel not deep enough, not enough room for sufficient ballast. It was salvaged in 1961 and its shipyard was turned into the Vasa Museum, a huge building that holds the Vasa itself, many artifacts found in and around the wreck, and several educational exhibits.

    All the exhibits are also in English, so it makes a good few hours for the family to visit. There are several other sites to visit on Djurgården Island making the trip out there worthwhile.

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  • fred98115's Profile Photo

    Get close to a 17th century warship

    by fred98115 Written Jun 23, 2011

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    Foredeck
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    The museum is centered around the Vasa, a warship that capsized on her maiden voyage in 1628. Seems the king wanted another cannon deck and it made the ship unstable. Salvaged in 1961 from the harbor, the Vasa has been painstakingly restored. Enter the climate controlled museum and walk around the ship on multiple levels to get a close up view of the ship. It is dark inside, so photos are hard to take, but it is still a great ship museum.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum

    by spidermiss Updated May 21, 2011

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    This museum is about the ship, Vasa, which was built in 1626, launched in 1628 but sank in 1628 after only just travelling out of the Stockholm Harbour. The ship had important links as King Gustav II Adolf commissioned Henrik Hybertsson and his brother Arendt de Groot to build Vasa. The ship was salvaged in 1961, 300 years later. The museum offers interactive displays about the ship including a film.

    I visited the museum in August 2003 during my weekend break in Stockholm. My Stockholm Card includes Vasa Museum but you can find out on the museum's website for further information including prices.

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  • jnyvegas's Profile Photo

    Huge old sunken ship recovered

    by jnyvegas Updated May 11, 2011
    a good side view of ship
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    This ship sunk in 1628 on it's maiden voyage before it even got out of the harbor. Not enough ballast. It was salvaged in 1961 and eventually restored and moved to this impressive building. There are many different levels and a great introductary movie in different languages. Go early I hear it gets crowded with school kids some days. No flash pictures inside so its hard to get a good photo

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    Impressive!

    by jorgec25 Written Aug 9, 2010

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    Vasa ship
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    Impressive is the word to describe the Vasa warship. Impressive in size, in the almost perfect state of conservation, and in how was it possible to make the building mistakes that led to its tragedy just moments after beginning its first journey.

    In all cases, we can see why this is one of the most visited places in Sweden. The amazing 17 th century warship, recovered from below the sea some 300 years after it sunk, is really impressive in its dimension.

    Besides the warship, naturally the main attraction, the rest of the museum is also worth a visit, since we get to know more about life aboard a 17 th century war ship, about ship building and life in general during that time.

    The whole space is very well presented, with different levels, and a impressive use of modern technologies.

    Definitely a must see!

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  • dambigir's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum

    by dambigir Written Dec 25, 2009

    On August 10, 1628 Vasa set sail on her maiden voyage and sank in Stockholm harbour.
    The wreck was salvaged in 1961 after 333 years under the sea. The reconstructed vessel, 95% original, is splendidly adorned with hundreds of carved sculptures.

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    Sunken 17th century warship

    by Karlie85 Written Sep 10, 2009

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    The Vasa
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    The Vasa museum is not your average museum, and it is definitely well worth a visit while you are in Stockholm. In the mid 17th century, a grand warship was ordered to be built by King Gustavus Adolphus. It is a huge ship, 230ft long and 170ft tall. Unfortunately, it was not built properly and sunk very shortly after departure on it’s maiden voyage on August 10, 1628. She wasn’t seen again until she was relocated by an amateur archeologist named Anders Franzen, who knew of the wreck and decided to try to find it on his own. The Vasa was finally raised from the bottom of the sea in 1959 almost entirely in one piece. The Vasa is now housed in the Vasa Museum in full glory. It is an overwhelming sight to see, walking through the doors and having a massive, original 17th century warship right in front of your eyes! There are plaques surrounding the ship on several floors as well as some artifacts from the ship. The most chilling part are the real skeletons of the unfortunate souls who did not survive, as well as their stories. There is also a theatre which plays informative videos in different languages throughout the day. Check the schedule for your language. The museum is very popular, so don’t be surprised if you have to wait in line for 5-10 minutes. We arrived just before lunch time right when the tour buses dropped everyone off, but the line moved fairly quickly. Plan to spend at least an hour in the museum.

    Café and giftshop.

    Hours:
    June 1 to August 31:
    8.30 a.m. - 6 p.m.

    September 1 to May 31:
    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m
    December 31 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Admission:
    Adults 95 SEK
    Students 50 SEK
    Children 0-18 FREE

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  • Most interesting museum I've ever been to.

    by Potat0zilla Updated Aug 11, 2009

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    This was quite possibly the most fascinating site I visited while staying in Stockholm. I was hoping that my excitement going into this museum wouldn't be shattered with disappointment, and it wasn't. The tour guides were very informative, and had some interesting facts. To see something from the seventeenth century so well preserved was a delight. Standing underneath it on the bottom floor, was the coolest thing, in my opinion. If you visit Stockholm, your trip is not complete unless you see the Vasa ship!

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