Vasa Museum, Stockholm

4.5 out of 5 stars 130 Reviews

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  • jnyvegas's Profile Photo

    Huge old sunken ship recovered

    by jnyvegas Updated May 11, 2011

    This ship sunk in 1628 on it's maiden voyage before it even got out of the harbor. Not enough ballast. It was salvaged in 1961 and eventually restored and moved to this impressive building. There are many different levels and a great introductary movie in different languages. Go early I hear it gets crowded with school kids some days. No flash pictures inside so its hard to get a good photo

    a good side view of ship front,  titanic or vasa or both The shit building has masts Back of ship
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  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum

    by pure1942 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Vasa Museum is an interesting and unique museum located on stockholm's djurgarden island.
    The main exhibition is of a 17th century swedish warship which sank in Stockholm harbour on her maiden voyage in 1628 after just 20 minutes.
    The wreck was salvaged in 1961 after 333 years under the the sea.
    Amazingly 95 percent of the ship is original. Having spent over 300 years in the waters of Stockholm Harbour it is unbelievable to think that so much of the ship has survived.
    The skeletal remains of a number of crew numbers and some of their possessions are also on display along with various exhibits centred around Swedish Naval History and there is also a Audio Visual Presentation on the History and Salvage Operation of the Vasa.

    The Vasa (Rear Carving) The Vasa Museuam on Djurgarden The Vasa Skeleton of Vasa Sailor

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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    Impressive!

    by jorgec25 Written Aug 9, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Impressive is the word to describe the Vasa warship. Impressive in size, in the almost perfect state of conservation, and in how was it possible to make the building mistakes that led to its tragedy just moments after beginning its first journey.

    In all cases, we can see why this is one of the most visited places in Sweden. The amazing 17 th century warship, recovered from below the sea some 300 years after it sunk, is really impressive in its dimension.

    Besides the warship, naturally the main attraction, the rest of the museum is also worth a visit, since we get to know more about life aboard a 17 th century war ship, about ship building and life in general during that time.

    The whole space is very well presented, with different levels, and a impressive use of modern technologies.

    Definitely a must see!

    Vasa ship Vasa ship Vasa ship Vasa ship
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  • dambigir's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum

    by dambigir Written Dec 25, 2009

    On August 10, 1628 Vasa set sail on her maiden voyage and sank in Stockholm harbour.
    The wreck was salvaged in 1961 after 333 years under the sea. The reconstructed vessel, 95% original, is splendidly adorned with hundreds of carved sculptures.

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  • Karlie85's Profile Photo

    Sunken 17th century warship

    by Karlie85 Written Sep 10, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Vasa museum is not your average museum, and it is definitely well worth a visit while you are in Stockholm. In the mid 17th century, a grand warship was ordered to be built by King Gustavus Adolphus. It is a huge ship, 230ft long and 170ft tall. Unfortunately, it was not built properly and sunk very shortly after departure on it’s maiden voyage on August 10, 1628. She wasn’t seen again until she was relocated by an amateur archeologist named Anders Franzen, who knew of the wreck and decided to try to find it on his own. The Vasa was finally raised from the bottom of the sea in 1959 almost entirely in one piece. The Vasa is now housed in the Vasa Museum in full glory. It is an overwhelming sight to see, walking through the doors and having a massive, original 17th century warship right in front of your eyes! There are plaques surrounding the ship on several floors as well as some artifacts from the ship. The most chilling part are the real skeletons of the unfortunate souls who did not survive, as well as their stories. There is also a theatre which plays informative videos in different languages throughout the day. Check the schedule for your language. The museum is very popular, so don’t be surprised if you have to wait in line for 5-10 minutes. We arrived just before lunch time right when the tour buses dropped everyone off, but the line moved fairly quickly. Plan to spend at least an hour in the museum.

    Café and giftshop.

    Hours:
    June 1 to August 31:
    8.30 a.m. - 6 p.m.

    September 1 to May 31:
    10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m
    December 31 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Admission:
    Adults 95 SEK
    Students 50 SEK
    Children 0-18 FREE

    The Vasa The Vasa 2
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  • Most interesting museum I've ever been to.

    by Potat0zilla Updated Aug 11, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was quite possibly the most fascinating site I visited while staying in Stockholm. I was hoping that my excitement going into this museum wouldn't be shattered with disappointment, and it wasn't. The tour guides were very informative, and had some interesting facts. To see something from the seventeenth century so well preserved was a delight. Standing underneath it on the bottom floor, was the coolest thing, in my opinion. If you visit Stockholm, your trip is not complete unless you see the Vasa ship!

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  • Roggeveen's Profile Photo

    Disaster ship turns into a fine museum

    by Roggeveen Written Aug 6, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When the warship Vasa sank on august 1628, on its first sail, it was a big dissaster. Who could have thought that this disaster turned out to be one of the finest maritime museums in the world.
    Focal point of the exhibition in the old restored warship. Around this ship you'll find many smaller axhibitions about topics connested to the ship: The live in Stockholm in 1600, Shipyards of Stockholm, Naval wars, living on board, the salvage and restauration, and many more ...

    Scaled model and Vasa on the background Vasa mirror (behind) Story of the sinking ship Story of the shipyards of Stockholm Vasa museum architecture
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  • simonli625's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum - The most well perserved Viking Ship

    by simonli625 Written Mar 28, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The vasa museum is built due to the discovery for the 17th century VASA ship. (1628)
    On 10 August 1628, the vasa set sail on the first trip and sank in stockholm harbour. Surprisingly, the ship was discovered in 1961. After years of restoration, the Vasa museum finally open to the public. The ship itself is huge and is the center pieces of the museum.

    If you are into history and want to see how the old Viking ships look like, then this musem is a must. I was amazed at how well the whole ship was perserved. You can also see some part is being rebuilt but most of the original timber was intact. Although you won't be able to go in the ship, the musuem did a great job of replicating many of the items on different display area in the museum.

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  • peliason's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum is for Pirates and History Buffs

    by peliason Written Jan 28, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I thought it was really cool, but the girls I was with hated it (we were all college-age). The entire Vasa boat is still in tact and you can actually walk around in it, which is really cool.

    The lighting in the museum is very dark, and I wonder if that made a negative difference for the girls I was with. They really just wanted to get outta there and move on to the next spot in town.

    The price of entry may have been a little high...then again, I was a college student...so most things were expensive to me!

    Inside the museum looking at the Vasa ship
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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum - spectacular ship that sank!

    by jumpingnorman Updated Nov 24, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I first saw the Vasa ship through the Travel Channel as I was watching Samantha Brown. I was intrigued with the story and so I booked a flight to Sweden (I am so easy to persuade...hehehe). But I was not disappointed since the ship is truly huge and spectacular. It was a bit dark in the museum and was difficult to take good pictures, but you can really feel the massiveness of the structure.

    It is a 17th century warship that went on its maiden voyage in 1628, but sank 20 minutes into the ceremony after the wind messed up the sails! It stayed at bottom of the harbor for 333 years, rediscovered in 1956 and raised up in 1961.

    I tried to imagine how grand it looked at the time - 95% of the original wood still remain. There's about 500 carved wooden statues and restorers tried to estimate the original color.

    At the upper floor, there is a circular wooden platform (those seen at the top of the sails), and if you go on it --- YOU WILL FEEL DIZZY! I just can't imagine how the sailors could tolerate being at such a small platform at such a scary height over the ocean. Must have been tough to earn a living then! I was born to be on land (definitely). So, try going on that circular wooden platform and see what I mean...

    Jun-Aug daily 1000-1700
    Sept-May M-F 1000-1600, Wed until 2000, Sat-Sun 1000-1700

    Brad Pitt on the Vasa Ship, Stockholm, Sweden Go on this circular wood platform on Vasa, Sweden! Colors on statues on Vasa Ship, Stockholm Go on this circular wood platform on Vasa, Sweden! Brad Pitt again on the Vasa Ship, Stockholm,Sweden
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  • parisanglo's Profile Photo

    The Vasamuseet

    by parisanglo Written Mar 31, 2008

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    Ahh, the Vasa... The pride of the Swedish navy, with a story that is strangely similar to that of the Titanic. Built in the 1620s, this ship was designed to be bigger and better than all other warships in the world - and yet she sank on her maiden voyage after having sailed only a few hundred metres out of the harbour. Though many lives were lost in this tragic event, the ship itself was beautifully preserved (the waters of the Baltic sea are apparantly very good at preserving wooden ships for hundreds of years). And so, in 1961, a team of Swedish archeologists and salvage experts successfully raised tha VASA from her watery, Baltic grave. Subsequently, the Vasa embarked upon a new career, this time as a work of art inside her own museum - the VASAMUSEET. The Vasa is arguably the world's finest and best preserved example of 17th century warship design and it is well worth a visit.

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  • agustath's Profile Photo

    The Wonders of the Vasa Museum

    by agustath Written Mar 31, 2008

    Let's put it simple, the Vasa museum is a must-see in Stockholm!

    The restored ship is a wonder by itself, the history of the times it was built (ca. 1600-1630) is displayed in a very interesting manner that makes one understand. Along with the story of how the ship was rescued, it will make you spend at least 2-3 hours in this museum.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Impressive

    by iaint Written Mar 28, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My son loved this. He would have been 10 or 11 at the time. Looked at everything, read everything and didn't want to leave.

    Its a museum housing a ship which sank in the harbour in 1628, about 1km into its maiden voyage. Discovered, recovered and preserved.

    Definitely worth a visit.

    Can't figure out why we don't have any photos, but try the website.

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  • dfactor's Profile Photo

    Vasa Museum

    by dfactor Written Jan 15, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I'm not a big fan of museum, but Vasa is certainly one of the best museum I've ever been to. I spent hours wandering around this museum, got there around 2pm, before I knew it, it was almost closing time at 5pm.

    There are plenty to keep you busy in this museum, and it is easy to get lost in this massive museum. The museum has a few levels which allows to see the ship, the ground level is equivalent to the sea level. I would suggest you to start with the theater, which shows you the history of Vasa, from the time it was built to the discovery of the ship and the restoration of the ship. Followed by the guided tour. Do take note of the tour schedule for the language you want.

    The restored ship is a wonder by itself. Vasa museum is must-see in Stockholm!

    Model of the decks Orginal and painted part of the ship

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    home of the Vasa ship

    by marielexoteria Updated Nov 24, 2007

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    The Vasa ship was constructed in the 1600's but unfortunately sank on her maiden trip. It was salvaged in 1961. The museum opened in 1990 and shows not only the wreck, but also glimpses of how people of that time lived.

    The Vasa ship (photo from Wikipedia)
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