Botanical garden, Uppsala

4 out of 5 stars 5 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Botanical Garden
    Botanical Garden
    by HORSCHECK
  • Botanical Garden
    Botanical Garden
    by HORSCHECK
  • Uppsala bothanical garden.
    Uppsala bothanical garden.
    by yvgr
  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Botanical Garden

    by HORSCHECK Written Dec 1, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Botanical Garden
    1 more image

    Uppsala's Botanical Garden was actually laid out as royal garden in the middle of the 17th century, but later in 1787 donated to the local university.

    It is the oldest botanical garden in Sweden and home to more than 9000 plants, a 200 year old orangery and a tropical greenhouse.

    Directions:
    The Botanical Garden is situated behind Uppsala Castle. It has gates towards the castle and the university library. Entrance is free.

    Address: Botanical Garden, Villavägen 8, 752 36 Uppsala

    Website: http://www.botan.uu.se/

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Uppsala Bothanical Garden - Linnés garden

    by yvgr Updated Apr 28, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Uppsala bothanical garden.

    The Linnaean Garden or Linnaeus' Garden (in Swedish Linnéträdgården) is the oldest of the botanical gardens belonging to Uppsala University in Sweden. It has been restored and is kept as an 18th century botanical garden, according to the specifications of Carolus Linnaeus.

    The garden was originally planned and planted by Olaus Rudbeck, professor of medicine, in 1655. Rudbeck also built the house adjacent to the garden. At the end of the 17th century it had about 1,800 different species, but was damaged in the Uppsala city fire 1702. Linnaeus became responsible for the garden in 1741 and had it rearranged according to his own ideas, documented in his work Hortus Upsaliensis (1748).

    After the gardens of Uppsala Castle had been donated to the university by King Gustav III to serve as a new botanical garden, the old one was left to decay. It was bought by the Swedish Linnaean Society in 1917 and restored according to the detailed description in the Hortus Upsaliensis. The garden was later taken over by the university, while the Linnaean Museum in the house in which Linnaeus had his home is still run by the Society. It is now one of two satellite gardens of the larger University of Uppsala Botanic Garden near Uppsala Castle. The second satellite is Linnaeus Hammarby, the former summer home of Linnaeus and his family.

    OPEN all year around, daily. It's free to stroll around and it has also a small Museum Hall.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Botanical Gardens

    by Sjalen Updated Oct 3, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sweden's oldest botanical gardens are from 1655. They have a lot to boast since famous botanist Carl von Linné (Linnaeus), made Uppsala his home as an academic and took over the running of the gardens in 1741. Here he developed the classification of plants we still use today with latin names and so, the gardens of course have a strong tradition they need to continue. In Linneaus' days, the gardens were along the Fyris river but this was both too swampy and too small, so after his death, one of his deciples persuaded the king to use the castle grounds instead. Thus, famous architect Hårleman started to design the grounds and as the king appreciated the works Linneaus had made, he even donated money himself to build Linnaeanum, the Orangery, in the gardens. Today, this is all left and you will also find a Tropical house. The gardens are of course used by biology- and horticultural students but open to the public most days. If you are interested in Linneaus himself, you could also visit the Linné Museum in the city, or his summer residence at Hammarby outside town. I have not done this as their opening hours are very erratic (frankly, an embarrassment) but in 2007 during the Linnaeus jubilee, I hope they have remedied this. Meanwhile, I can of course myself always visit his birth house in my granddad's area in the south of Sweden. Check out my Råshult page to see what it looks like.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Study Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • curiosone's Profile Photo

    If you like green plants..

    by curiosone Updated Jan 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    u.f.o. in the sky?

    It extends over 34 acres with more than 11000 species coultivated outdoor and indoor.It was built
    on the Uppsala castle garden during 1787AD,because the old garden(that one of Linnaeus),was becoming too little...
    I like very much plants,so I WOULD have found it really
    interesting....but it was closed!
    At the next time! Sick!
    Entrance:20Sek

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ken_Weaver's Profile Photo

    Linnaeus Gardens

    by Ken_Weaver Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Linnaeus Gardens

    After you have toured the castle you can look out the back area of the castle and see the beautiful gardens of Carolus Linnaeus, the scientist who developed the system of naming plant and animals that is used worldwide today.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Uppsala

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

74 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Botanical garden
3.0 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
2.0 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.1 miles away
3.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Uppsala hotels