Fun things to do in Uppsala

  • Botanical Garden
    Botanical Garden
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  • Botanical Garden
    Botanical Garden
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  • Royal Mounds of Gamla Uppsala
    Royal Mounds of Gamla Uppsala
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Uppsala

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    Gunilla Bell Tower

    by HORSCHECK Written Dec 1, 2013

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    In 1588 Queen Gunilla, wife of King Johan III, donated the Gunilla Bell (Gunillaklockan) to the castle chapel. In 1702 large parts of the castle, including the bell tower were destroyed by fire.

    The Gunilla bell was recast in 1759 and moved to a wooden bell tower on the Styrbiskop Bastion, just next to the castle. At that time the sound of the bell marked the beginning and end of the daily curfew.

    Directions:
    The Gunilla Bell Tower can be found on a little hill of the Styrbiskop Bastion, just north west of Uppsala Castle.

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    Michael's Church

    by HORSCHECK Written Dec 1, 2013

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    The Michael's Church (Mikaelskyrkan) was built after designs of the Swedish architect Axel Frithiof Kumlien. It was consecrated in 1892 in an area, which at that time was among the poorest districts of Uppsala.

    Nowadays the church is used by the Uppsala City Mission and the Evangelical Homeland Foundation (EFS).

    Directions:
    The Michael's Church is located in the northern city centre. It can be found between the railway line and the main street Kungsgatan. The church is surrounded by a small park.

    Address: Michael's Church, Skolgatan 26, 753 16 Uppsala

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    Shopping in saluhallen

    by akkipaa Written Apr 23, 2012

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    Whather you like syrströmming or not, purchase it from here. I bought a tin, it was not in the rack but brought from cellaren, and later I opened it, but that is different story.

    Check the web pages, definitely place worth of visiting.

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    Events in English

    by marielexoteria Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Everything in English organizes a few selected events where the main language is English. They were the people behind "Dinosaur Day" at the
    Museom of Evolution. They also help out expats from English speaking countries.

    Check out the link below for their events.

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    Uppsala Spa & Skönketsvård

    by marielexoteria Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Although Uppsala isn't the first place you think of when it comes to spas, if you're there and you feel like indulging yourself with a wellness treatment or a massage, this is the place to go.

    I had a facial deep cleaning and a 30-minute massage. The therapist who treated me explained the process step by step and always made sure that I was comfortable or asked if I needed anything. Plus for a great mask made of black clay! After I was done I felt like new.

    The decor and the music makes you feel relaxed as you step in as their staff makes sure you feel taken care of. I truly believe this spa can live up to even the most demanding customer's expectations.

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    Travel in an old steamer with Lennakatten

    by marielexoteria Updated May 15, 2010

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    Lennakatten is how people in Uppsala call the steam train line that goes between Uppsala and Faringe. This steam train ride takes about 1h05 including a stop in Marielund to fill up water.

    The train goes during the summer and with a day ticket you can get off at any given station, explore the area and then get on a later train either forward or back.

    The train I rode today had 3 cars, 1 with windows but without windshields so I could take some nice pictures without the reflection on the windows, but my clothes got some of the debris coming from the locomotive, as it's powered with coal and water (not too bad), so take this into consideration.

    The trains are bike friendly and pram friendly.

    Check the link below for information on prices (which vary depending on where you get on and where you get off the train), timetables and other information.

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    Linnéträdgården/Linnaeus' garden

    by marielexoteria Updated May 10, 2010

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    I was invited to a wedding at Linnéträdgården but between mingling and the ceremony, I saw a little bit of the garden.

    Linnéträdgården is a replica of what Carl von Linné's garden looked like in the 18th century. In the main building I saw some information about the works done by Linné and other botanists such as Olof Rudbeck Sr and Jr and the history of the garden. There's also pictures, some of Linnés writings and some guidebooks that you can borrow to make the visit more educational.

    In the premises, there's a small house where Linné used to live, and today is a museum run by the the Swedish Linnaeus Society.

    Who was Carl von Linné? He was a professor in botany and medicine at Uppsala University between 1741 and 1778, and he's known as the father of modern taxomony.

    Practical information: as of the link below, the entrance fees are 60 SEK for an adult and free for children up to 16 years of age. The garden is open between May and September, Tuesdays to Sundays between 11am and 5pm, but some parts are open until 8pm.

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    Summer Festivals

    by angiebabe Updated Dec 19, 2008

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    Uppsala has a lovely big park in the centre of town - next to the canal - and the day I arrived they were gearing up for a big concert evening - I had nowhere to stay but had found a place out at Gimo which I wanted to drive to while it was still daylight so I didnt stay for the festival in the park.

    July and August are the peak summer months and all sorts of entertainment and festivals are put on during these months to look out for.

    Contact the tourist offices for upcoming info or google lookup whats on for the place or region in question.

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    Day trip up to lovelyGamla Gefle old town at Gavle

    by angiebabe Written Dec 14, 2008

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    About an hour north of Uppsala is Gavle and its lovely Gamla Gefle (old town) of wooden houses - the only part of Gavle to survive a 19th century fire.

    You will find it on the other side of the canal from the main city centre - and makes up several streets of area. The youth hostel, which is also in an old wooden building, pretty much is at the far border of Gamla Gefle from the canal.

    I had a lovely hour or two walking these small streets twice! taking lovely photos - especially when it started raining while the sun was still shining! and then a rainbow appeared at the end of one of the Gamla Gefle streets!

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    Drive up to Oregrund on the coast

    by angiebabe Written Aug 10, 2008

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    Lovely seaside 'summer town' as the manager of my hostel at Gimo called it and had recommended it as a visit on my way up to Gavle to see the old town there.

    And with the sun out, blue sky and sun shining it was lovely. A small seaside town full of quaint and characteristic wooden houses and cottages with a rocky shore and crashing waves on one side and a quiet harbour and marina on the other.

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    Walk on Kungsängsgatan

    by marielexoteria Updated Nov 18, 2007

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    Kungsängsgatan is a pedestrian street where most of the shops are as well as places to eat. Some places have entrances to that street: Forum gallerian, S:t Per gallerian, the library. In the middle of that street you'll find Stora Torget. Walk towards the river and you'll find the SF movie theaters and a little farther, the Cathedral and the Uppsala Castle.

    When the weather permits there's street sellers selling souvenirs, t-shirts, fresh fruit and roasted almonds.

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    The Orangery, Linnaeus Garden

    by MalenaN Written Jun 4, 2007

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    The Orangery at Linnaeus Garden was built in 1744 and had three parts. It was Frigidarium, which was the coolest part and where plants were kept during winter, plants that were brought out during summer. In Caldarium it was warm and humid, and in Tepidarium it was hot and dry. During Linnaeus time there were also some foreign animals kept in the orangery.

    After the botanical garden moved in the beginning of the 19th century the orangery was converted into a clubhouse for students. The walls were made more solid and the windows smaller, which they are still today.

    In the orangery there is an exhibition on the garden’s history.

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    The Linnaeus Garden

    by MalenaN Written Jun 1, 2007

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    While Carl Linnaeus was a professor at Uppsala University he was also head of the Botanical Garden (now the Linnaeus Garden). The garden was badly damaged by a fire in the beginning of the 18th century. When Linnaeus came to Uppsala he created a garden in a baroque style and it became a place were many students came to listen to his lectures and to see his demonstrations. In the garden there was an orangey, greenhouses and hotbeds. And the layout of the garden was very much the same as it is today with an area for perennial plants and another area with annual and biennial species. There were also, like in present time, three ponds with different humid environments, the river pond, the lake pond and the marsh pond.

    In the garden it is only allowed to cultivate plants that were there in Linnaeus time.

    Many years ago when I visited many times the entrance was free to visit the garden which I think is good if you want to come back during the summer to see what is in bloom for the moment or just walk around in this relaxing place, in the middle of Uppsala. Last time I visited the price to enter was 50 kr, but that also included the entrance to the museum.

    The garden is open daily 1st May - 30th September, between 11 - 20.

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    Across the city

    by pikuu Updated Nov 17, 2006

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    200 000 residents are living in this picturesque city. But the centre very often seems quite empty. And this is the Upsalla strong point. Are you looking for place not far from civilization but simultaneously the place where the life is slower (in postive meaning)? - visit this Swedish city.

    My recomendations: old town with Uppsala Cathedral and Gustavianum, charming alleys along the Fyris River and Gamla Uppsala (several kilometres from the centre).

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    Gågatan the pedestrian street

    by Maline Updated Jul 5, 2005

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    The heart of commercial downtown Uppsala is made up of the pedestrian street (called Gågatan). Gågatan is the part of Svartbäcksgatan which runs between S:t Olofsgatan and Bangårdsgatan.
    Along this street there atre four malls (not huge); namely the S:t Per mall, The Fenixhuset mall, The Forum mall and one block further down the Svava mall.

    Gågatan is where you do basically all your shopping in Uppsala, unless you want to go by car to the bigger stores on the outskirts of the city, such as IKEA or Bauhaus.

    Along the Gågatna you can fins among others these stores:
    Åhléns, Vero Moda, Stadium sports gear, Expert, Ur&Penn, Lindex, H&M, Kick's, Wedins accesoirer,Nilsons shoes, Brothers and many more.
    Also, the city public library is on this street.

    There are also numeruos cafés and restaurants along the street, and in summer there are lots of sidewalk tables out.

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