Trollhättan Favorites

  • Favorites
    by SAAB93
  • oil plug is to the right in this photo
    oil plug is to the right in this photo
    by SAAB93
  • oil drain plug to the left (with a paper sticker a
    oil drain plug to the left (with a paper...
    by SAAB93

Most Recent Favorites in Trollhättan

  • Oil Changes Made Easy, part 1

    by SAAB93 Updated Nov 4, 2007
    oil plug is to the right in this photo

    Favorite thing: 1. Consider (not required) turning the wheels to the left to allow better access to the oil plug. Open the hood/bonnet. (You don't want to drain the oil and later find that your hood/bonnet release is broken and you cannot fill the car with oil!) Position drain pan under oil plug. Note that oil shoots approximately 6 inches (15 cm) rearward so take into account the distance when placing the drain pan on the floor. The drain plug is arms length from the right side of the car about level with the front edge of the tire. It faces backwards.
    (see photos: oil drain is toward the right, the photo is taken from just in front of the right tire, right being when sitting in the car).

    CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE A LARGER VERSION. Note for critics: this is a general tip suitable for virtualtourist.com. If you don't change the oil, the car will die and you won't be able to go anywhere in the car...that's travel related!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oil Changes Made Easy, part 2

    by SAAB93 Updated Sep 21, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    oil drain plug to the left (with a paper sticker a
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Some more photos of the oil drain plug. The oil drain plug is toward the left of the photo (taken from just in front of the right tire, right in the perspective of people sitting in the car). The next photo is with oil drain plug removed with a bit of oil seen dripping out.

    SEE ONE MORE PHOTO BY CLICKING THE LINK UNDER THIS PHOTO.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oil Changes Made Easy, part 5

    by SAAB93 Written Sep 21, 2005
    SAAB oil filters, made in Germany (left), France (

    Favorite thing: 7. Pull off the oil filter from the oil filter cover. Replace the green oil filter cover gasket and lubricate the new gasket with some oil. Place new oil filter. Tighten cover to slightly more than finger tight (18 ft. lbs. of torque or 25 Nm). In the classic 900, I poured some oil into the filter to reduce the amount of time that the engine runs dry without much oil. However, in the 9-3, if you pour oil into the oil filter compartment, it drains away. Therefore, I don’t think it is necessary to pour oil here. This is a photo of the SAAB oil filter installed in the factory (Hengst E630H Energetic, made in Germany, part number 12 579 143) and a new SAAB oil filter (Purflux L264A, made in France, part number 24460713)
    8. Fill the engine with 6 quarts of oil (yellow cap shown in the photo under "Oil Changes made Easy, part 4). Check for oil leaks when the engine is running. The owner’s manual says that the oil capacity is 6.3 quarts (6.0 l). A small amount of clings to the crankcase and engine so it is probably not necessary to add any oil in addition to the 6 quarts or, at most 0.1 quarts. Overfilling the oil is never recommended in any car.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oil Changes Made Easy, part 4

    by SAAB93 Written Sep 21, 2005
    oil filter cap is black, in center of photo
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Remove the oil filter cover. I use a 32 mm socket from Sears ($6.99) and an extension (approx. 6.99-7.99 at Sears) which connects to the socket wrench. See photo where the black oil filter cover is in the center. (See photo where a box wrench is used to point to the oil filter cover.)

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Oil Changes Made Easy, part 3

    by SAAB93 Written Sep 21, 2005
    map shows the best position on where to lie down

    Favorite thing: 2. The best position to lie down is shown. (see photo: map on the floor keeps clothes clean). I did not find it necessary to use jacks or Rhinoramps. If you use a jack, use jackstands. Working under a jack is considered dangerous and potentially a fatal error (causing death).
    3. A 15 mm socket wrench or perhaps a box wrench is the best.
    4. After oil drains, replace the oil plug, change the rubber washer on the oil plug. Tighten slightly more than finger tight (18 ft. lbs. of torque or 25 Nm). Saab reports cracking of the crankcase with excessive tightening in the classic 900. The oil plug was not excessively tight or difficult to remove during the first oil change. It seems that gorillas do not work in this part of the assembly line in Trollhattan.
    5. Remove black plastic engine cover (says “SAAB turbo”) by unscrewing the 3 Torx screws. The factory WIS service manual recommends removing the atmospheric pressure sensors and manifold absolute pressure sensor connections and moving the cables. However, I do not have any access problems if I don’t disconnect these wires.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Consider not returning the car with an empty tank.

    by SAAB93 Updated May 23, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Before you return the car for transatlantic shipment, consider filling the gas tank so that there is at least half a tank. If you have a full tank, there is less of a chance for moisture condensation. If the tank is very empty, part of the fuel pump will be exposed and subject to oxidation. On the other hand, the shipping company may drain the gas tank if it is too full. Therefore, consider perhaps a 1/3 full tank.

    There is a Shell Tankomatic (unmanned station) next to the Beko Bil car dealership in Gothenburg. I used the Statoil station, which has air for tires, one exit before (west of) the one to Beko Bil.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Air for tires dispensed differently in Sweden

    by SAAB93 Updated May 15, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In the US, air is dispensed by an air hose. In Sweden, air is free. Usually there is a cabinet near one of the walls of the gas station, possibly marked "luft" or air.

    There is a small canister similar in shape to a propane tank. It has a metal rod which the tank hangs to the recepticle. It also has a small rubber hose and a nozzle that fits to the tire valvestem. If you look carefully, you will see two buttons on the canister, marked + and -.

    To add air, hold the nozzle very firmly to the valvestem. You will lose air if not held tightly. Then press the + button for about 1 second to add air. There is a warning not to hold it for more than one second so as not to risk overinflation.

    The cannister only has enough air to fill one tire (or less). You have to refill the cannister with air by hanging the metal rod (not completely shown in the photo) back in the storage cabinet. The cabinet that I used had 2 cannisters so that you could recharge one as you used the second one.

    SAAB recommends that you overinflate the tires to 43 psi before you store the car for long periods. Therefore, just before you return the car for transatlantic shipment, consider overfilling the tires to 43 psi. Consider bring a tire gauge with you on the trip.

    For those of you returning the car to Gothenburg, the returning point is the Beko Bil car dealer in Askim. There is an automated, unmanned Shell station (Tankomatic) next to Beko Bil, but I did not see air there.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Trollhättan

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

63 travelers online now

Comments

Trollhättan Favorites

Reviews and photos of Trollhättan favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Trollhättan sightseeing.

View all Trollhättan hotels