International Red Cross and Red Crescent, Geneva

4 out of 5 stars 11 Reviews

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    The Red Cross and Crescent
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    Cresecent and Cross
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  • Xfire's Profile Photo

    Red Cross Museum MICR-Free entrance

    by Xfire Written Apr 22, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When in Geneva and low of money or having a rainy day, go to the Red Cross Museum. It has changing small expositions that are free.

    There is also a restaurant, a boutique and a wardrobe(not guarded).

    Check their website for current expositions and for free guided tours.

    Opening hours are from 10 am to 5 pm, except Tuesdays.

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  • hollykate's Profile Photo

    Red Cross Museum

    by hollykate Updated Apr 12, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a neat place, and I learned a lot during my visit. For instance, I didn't know that the Red Cross had two symbols: the red cross and the red crescent. The crescent originated because a group of people didn't want the Red Cross to be represented by a cross and its association with Christianity. Also, before the Red Cross came about, one man had gone around and taken down peoples' names to try to connect them to their families in war-type situations. The Red Cross is a great organization because it crosses lines and tries to help any person in need. There were people of all nationalties here as well, and that was very cool to see. I recommend coming here to learn a little about what they do. It's a good museum!

    The Red Cross and Crescent
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    International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum

    by eranda Written Nov 7, 2005

    This world famous museum, unanimously and highly praised as one of the best in the city and the world , provides a moving souvenir of the consequence of international compassionate efforts past centauries and the current issues

    International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum

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    International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum

    by Tripack Written Oct 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Humanity could be grateful of the initiative of Henri Dunant.

    Dunant arrived in the Italian town of Solferino to witness, and to participate in the aftermath of, one of the bloodiest battles of the nineteenth century. His awareness and conscience honed, he published in 1862 a small book Un Souvenir de Solférino (A Memory of Solferino), destined to make him famous.

    His idea is that the nations of the world should form relief societies to provide care for the wartime wounded; each society should be sponsored by a governing board composed of the nation's leading figures, should appeal to everyone to volunteer, should train these volunteers to aid the wounded on the battlefield and to care for them later until they recovered. He created a comittee which call for an international conference and founded the Red Cross. The conference with thirty-nine delegates from sixteen nations attending, approved some sweeping resolutions and laid the groundwork for a gathering of plenipotentiaries. On August 22, 1864, twelve nations signed an international treaty, commonly known as the Geneva Convention, agreeing to guarantee neutrality to sanitary personnel, to expedite supplies for their use, and to adopt a special identifying emblem: a red cross on a field of white (in fact the opposite color of the Swiss flag).


    "Everyone is responsible to everyone for everything".

    Dostoevsky's words greet visitors in the entrance hall of the museum, where they are engraved, a reminder of the universal nature of humanity.

    The Musée international de la Croix-Rouge depicts acts of human solidarity in such a way as to inspire hope and provoke reflection. The museum tends to show that nothing can be achieved by adopting a resigned attitude through photos, films, objects and documents are presented through audio-visual displays and
    computer terminals.


    Audio-guides (French, German, English, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese)
    Opening hours: Every day except Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    International Red Cross and Red Crescent HQ

    by Blatherwick Written Jan 7, 2005

    The Red Cross provides humanitarian assistance, medical aid and emergency relief around the world during natural disasters and wars. The Red Cross offers training in first aid, CPR, disaster assistance, lifeguard training, swimming safety and even safe babysitting. The Red Cross also runs blood banks in several countries. The Red Cross run various public health programs and provides home care services for the elderly in some countries. The Red Cross provides care packages for POWs, inspections of POW camps, registration and reunion services for refugees and passports and travel documents for stateless persons.

    In 1859, Henry Dunant witnessed the carnage at the Battle of Solférino, where the victory of the French over the Austrians left 40,000 dead and wounded. Although he had been simply passing by, he stayed to help the wounded in the nearby town of Castiglione.

    Dunant advocated the establishment of an international network of volunteer relief agencies to act as an "army" of medical services in times of war. On August 22, 1864, representatives from 16 countries adopted the first Geneva Convention, which became the basis for the ICRC.

    The red cross (an inversion of the flag of Switzerland) was adopted as the symbol of the movement under the original Geneva Convention. However, in the 1870s, the Ottoman Empire declared it would use the red crescent instead of the red cross. In 1929, the red crescent, as then in use in Egypt and Turkey, and the red lion and sun, as used in Persia, were both formally recognised as alternative emblems. The use of the red lion and sun was discontinued in 1980.

    The League of Red Cross Societies changed its name in 1986 to the "International Movement of the Red Cross and the Red Crescent" in recognition of its Muslim Red Crescent branches.

    Henry Dunant was awarded the very first Nobel Prize for Peace in 1901, and the International Red Cross subsequently won in the war years of 1917 and 1944 and in its centenary year in 1963.

    International Red Cross and Red Crescent HQ
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    International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum

    by Blatherwick Written Jan 7, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is one of the best museums in Europe. The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum exhibits include a historical account of the founding of the movement, its predecessors, mementos from its activities around the world, and most interestingly records of prisoners of war from World War I. Mementos include promotional posters and artifacts made by prisoners visited by the movement. You are faced with but one chapter of the Red Cross/Crescent even before you enter the museum when you are confronted by the statues of 11 hostages just outside the main entrance. The museum uses video displays, slide-shows, interactive technology, and single images to convey the stories. The museum is refreshingly full of the ideology of human compassion without the usual slant of political systems.

    Henry Dunant founded the Red Cross in Geneva in 1863, he needed a recognizable symbol to suggest neutrality. The Swiss flag (a white cross on a red field), with the colors reversed, ended up providing the perfect symbol for one of the world's greatest humanitarian movements. The symbol was amended to include the Crescent to make it more familiar to Muslim countries. Henry Dunant was awarded the very first Nobel Prize for Peace in 1901, and the International Red Cross subsequently won in the war years of 1917 and 1944 and in its centenary year in 1963.

    The Hostages - Red Cross/Crescent Museum
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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Red Cross Headquarters

    by littlesam1 Updated Jan 30, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Geneva is the birthplace of the Red Cross. The Red Cross headquarters has a museum and is worth a visit. The museum is open between 10 am and 5 pm daily (closed on Tuesdays). There is also a restaurant and cafeteria.

    Red Cross

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  • aliante1981's Profile Photo

    International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum

    by aliante1981 Written Jul 21, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Now, if you’re a French-speaker, you can ask for Musée International de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge. Personally, I always called it the Red Cross Museum.

    Here you can experience the legendary past of one of the best known international humanitarian organizations - the Red Cross. And right in the city to which this organization owes its origins; it's across from the visitors' entrance to the European headquarters of the United Nations.

    This one struck me as the museum which makes the best use of multimedia capabilities. I am speaking here of Geneva’s museums, of course. There are others like this in Switzerland, and, indeed, in the whole world. The dramatic story from 1863 – the day when the Red Cross was established - to the present is revealed through displays of rare documents and photographs, films, multiscreen slide shows, and cycloramas. You're taken from the battlefields of Europe to the plains of Africa, in Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of Congo and many other places to see what Red Cross actually is, to see it in action.

    When Henry Dunant (he is still considered one of the greatest folks of Geneva for this very reason, by the way) founded the Red Cross in Geneva in 1863, he needed a recognizable symbol to suggest neutrality. The Swiss flag (a white cross on a red field), with the colors reversed, ended up providing the perfect symbol for one of the world's greatest humanitarian movements. The symbol was amended to make it more familiar to Muslim countries, including their religious symbol – the Crescent. Just as the original emblem includes the Christian symbol – the Cross.

    Admission 10SF ($5.50) adults; 5SF ($2.75) students, seniors, and children. Free for those who are holders of the Swiss Museum Pass. Hours: Wed-Mon 10am-5pm.

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  • karinyeung's Profile Photo

    Red Cross Museum

    by karinyeung Written Jun 23, 2003

    Incredibly moving and inspiring experience! Makes me want to join the Red Cross!

    Acclaimed as one of the best museums in Europe. Using highly effective video displays, slide-shows and interactive technology (always with an English-language option), it chronicles in detail the history of conflict in the twentieth century, and the role the Red Cross has played in providing aid to combatants and civilians caught up in both war and natural disasters. The displays are strikingly affecting, always using clear single images to tell a story instead of swamping you with facts and figures, and always avoiding judgement or ideological point-scoring.

    (International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum: Mon & Wed–Sun 10am–5pm; Fr.10)

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  • CliffClaven's Profile Photo

    Founder of the Red Cross

    by CliffClaven Written Aug 24, 2002

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    It was a citizen of Geneva, Henry Dunant, who founded the International Red Cross in 1863. Since then - in spite of, or perhaps because of, the horrors the world has managed to inflict on itself - the International Red Cross has endeavoured unceasingly to alleviate misery and suffering around the world. With successive Geneva Conventions, it has attempted to regulate conduct in war and ensure proper treatment for civilians and prisoners. Henry Dunant was awarded the very first Nobel Prize for Peace in 1901, and the International Red Cross subsequently won in the war years of 1917 and 1944 and in its centenary year in 1963.

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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    Musee de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge

    by gordonilla Written Apr 18, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The museum is bunker like and made of glass and concrete. It documenst the history of the Red Cross from formation until the present day. It is moving and informative.

    The International Committee of the Red Cross Museum Cornerstone Cresecent and Cross

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