Palais des Nations, Geneva

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 5 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Ariana museum
    Ariana museum
    by mindcrime
  • Palais des Nations
    by mindcrime
  • Palais des Nations
    by mindcrime
  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    United Nations at parc de ‘Ariana

    by mindcrime Updated Jul 21, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Thousands of visitors take the tour of the Palais des Nations. But you need to have your transport with you, pass through security check, obtain a visitor’s photo id badge, be patient as an individual visitor if there are lots of preregistered groups etc

    With all that in mind I decided to walk a bit around at parc d’Ariana (pic 3), find a nice bench opposite Ariana museum (pic 4) and read about League of Nations, the intergovernmental organization that was founded after WWI to maintain peace, preventing wars etc (yeah right…). Palais des Nations was built in 1929 as headquarters of the League, now the Headquarter of the European part of United Nations, second in size after the UN Headquarters in NY. Funny to read that Switzerland became a member of United Nation only in 2002!

    Anyway as a visitor you can go there (only as part of a guided tour, cant tour around freely) and check some areas like the Human Rights and Alliance of Civilizations Room, the Salle des Pas Perdus, Assembly Hall, Council Chamber etc

    From September to March it’s open Monday to Friday 10.00-12.00 (tours at 10.30 and 12.00) 14.00-16.00 (tours at 14.30 and 16.00)
    From April to June it’s open Monday to Saturday 10.00-12.00 (tours at 10.30 and 12.00) 14.00-16.00 (tours at 14.30 and 16.00)
    From July to August it’s open Monday to Saturday 10.00 to 16.00 (tours start at 10.30)

    The entrance fee is 12chf

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • darryl.wilson's Profile Photo

    Day Trip to the United Nations

    by darryl.wilson Written May 21, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Palais Des Nations
    4 more images

    Geneva is a beautiful place to visit. The people are warm and very friendly. If you love politics or history, one of the most magnicent places to visit is the United Nations - the Palais des Nations. The guided tour is only about $10 and it takes you on a guided tour of the entire facility and special meeting rooms. The tour guides are very knowledgeable and friendly. It is an opportunity to walk where some of the great leaders have walked. The tours are available in numerous languages and the immediate vicinity around the building is a nice place to walk.

    I was only in Geneva for a short flight lay over but I had just enough time to go from the airport in the morning to visit the UN in the afternoon and be back to Geneva airport in time for my next flight. I didn't know how wonderful Geneva is. I wish I had more time to visit it!

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Palais des Nations Gardens

    by Blatherwick Updated Jan 7, 2005
    Palais des Nations Gardens

    The gardens of the Palais des Nations are full of artworks that present a message. Behind me in the picture you can see the AIDS memorial presented with 2 of the letters on the top and 2 on the bottom. This is done because the virus is known as SIDA in some countries so the spelling is fluent here.

    The Celestial Sphere in the background is a gift from the United States in 1939 (Even though they weren't a part of the League of Nations). Gift of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. The spherical frame is adorned with constellations and stars. The 85 constellations are gilded and the 840 stars are silvered. The sphere is equipped with a motor to revolve slowly around an axis turned to the Pole Star. This motor no longer works.

    Other important monuments that were gifts from Member States, private sponsors and artists include:

    * The Great Centaur by Ernst Neizvestny (1997). Gift from the Russian Federation.

    * Family by Edwina Sandys (1979). Gift from Anthony and Penny Oppenheimer to the United Nations Children’s Fund.

    * The Spreading of the Seeds and the Gathering of Ashes by Esther Shalev-Gerz and Jochen Gerz (1995). Gift from Germany on the occasion of the fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations.

    * The Tower of Loneliness by Per Kirkeby (Denmark, 1995). Gift from the artist.

    * Memorial (collective gift, 2003). Gift in memory of civil servants who lost their lives in the service of peace.

    * Cenotaph (tomb of Gustave Revilliod, 1890).

    * Montbovon Chalet (Switzerland, 1668). Acquisition by the Revilliod Foundation.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Palais des Nations - Conquest of Space

    by Blatherwick Written Jan 7, 2005
    Palais des Nations - Conquest of Space

    The Conquest of Space was created by Barsh, Kolchin, Faidish and Youri Neroda in 1971. This tall grey monument coated with heat resistant titanium was a gift from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics to commemorate man's (and specifically the USSR's) ability to travel to outer space.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Palais des Nations

    by Blatherwick Updated Jan 7, 2005
    Palais des Nations

    The Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, was built between 1929 and 1938 as the headquarters of the League of Nations. Today it serves as the United Nations' European headquarters and flies the UN flag.

    What you'll get on a tour of the facility is:

    * One of the conference rooms in the new building.
    * Some of the gifts presented by various countries to the United Nations Office at Geneva
    * The Salle des Pas Perdus, from where you can see the Armillary Sphere and the monument commemorating the conquest of outer space.
    * The Assembly Hall, the largest room in the Palais des Nations.
    * The Council Chamber, where many important negotiations have taken place. The walls are covered with impressive murals.
    * A film on the activities and the objectives of the United Nations Office at Geneva.

    Remember to bring your passport as you are officially leaving Switzerland when you enter these grounds.

    The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the First World War with its constitution being approved by the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. The League's goals included disarmament, preventing war through collective security, and settling disputes between countries through negotiation, diplomacy, and by the global welfare improvement. Despite these bold aims, the League proved incapable of preventing aggression by the fascist powers in late 1930s.

    The United Nations effectively replaced the League of Nations after World War II and inherited a number of agencies and organizations founded by the League. The United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG) is the second largest United Nations centre after the United Nations Headquarters in New York. When you hear of peace talks being conducted in Geneva this is where they take place.

    Beneath the Palais des Nations's foundation stone is a capsule containing a document listing the names of the League of Nations Member States, a copy of the Covenant of the League, and specimen coins of all the countries represented at its Tenth Assembly.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Geneva

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

83 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Palais des Nations
4.0 out of 5 stars
254 Opinions
0.3 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
69 Opinions
0.5 miles away
Show Prices
3.5 out of 5 stars
64 Opinions
0.7 miles away
Show Prices

View all Geneva hotels