Boats, Geneva

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  • 2. Our skipper getting ready to cast off on the M2
    2. Our skipper getting ready to cast off...
    by Nemorino
  • 3. Going under the bridge
    3. Going under the bridge
    by Nemorino
  • 3. Steering the M2 across the harbor
    3. Steering the M2 across the harbor
    by Nemorino
  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Yellow boats route M2

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 31, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Photos:
    1. Dock at Pâquis for route M2
    2. Our skipper getting ready to cast off on the M2
    3. Here she is steering the M2 across the harbor
    4. The M2 with the Jet d'eau in the background

    This line goes straight across the harbor from Pâquis on the north shore to Eaux-Vives on the south.

    1. Dock at P��quis for route M2 2. Our skipper getting ready to cast off on the M2 3. Steering the M2 across the harbor 4. The M2 with the Jet d'eau in the background
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Yellow boats route M1

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 31, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Photos:
    1. Dock at Pâquis for route M1
    2. Route M1 boat approaching Mont-Blanc bridge
    3. Going under the bridge
    4. Approaching the dock at Molard on the left bank of the Rhône River

    This particular route reminds me of the Limmat Boats in Zürich, which also have to be quite low to go under several bridges on the Limmat River on their way from the Zürich Main Station to the lake.

    1. Dock at P��quis for route M1 2. Route M1 boat approaching Mont-Blanc bridge 3. Going under the bridge 4. Approaching the dock at Molard
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • sswagner's Profile Photo

    Take a lake cruise

    by sswagner Written Jun 22, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Since Lake Geneva (Lac Leman) is the largest lake in the country, it seemed most logical to take a boat trip here. We rode to the town of Nyon on a lake steamer and then took the train back. This was a very relaxing hour. On sunny days, there will be sailboats and powerboats everywhere as people enjoy this stunning setting. The Swiss Pass covers lake steamers as well as the trains. There are usually on board refreshments available for sale. The boat ride was a nice way to relax and get to see something at the same time. I highly recommend this if you go to Geneva.

    View from the boat
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • Cheap Boat Tour on the Lake

    by grund123 Written Jul 11, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A great and cheap way to see the city from the Lake: use the public transport boats that cross the Lake and link the city to the parks on each side. Bus tickets and one day passes are valid on the boats.
    4 lines (see map):
    M1 Line
    Pâquis – quai Gustave Ador – Pâquis
    M2 Line
    Pâquis – Molard – Pâquis
    M3 Line
    Pâquis – Genève-plage-Pâquis
    M4 Line Genève-plage – Perle du Lac-Genève-plage

    The M3 boat continues as M4 so you don't even have to change boats

    Schedule:
    M1 and M2 every 10min (ride 10min)
    M3 and M4 every 30min (ride 25min)
    All year long, service starts at 7h30 on weekdays and at 10h on weekends

    Boat network map
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Cruise

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  • GETTING AROUND By Boat...

    by Tal_A Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    GETTING AROUND

    By Boat
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    The Compagnie Générale de Navigation (CGN) sur le Lac Léman (Jardin-Anglais, CH-1204 Genève, tel. 022/311-25-21) offers steamer transportation between most lake ports, including those of France as well as Lausanne and Montreux. Holders of the Swiss Pass travel free; those with a Swissboat Pass receive a 50% discount. Boat excursions onto the lake are offered by several smaller private firms, including Mouettes Genevoises (tel. 022/732-29-44) and Swissboat (tel. 022/732-47-47).


    By Car
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    Driving is on the right. In built-up areas, the speed limit is 50 kph (31 mph); on main highways, 80 kph (50 mph); on expressways, 120 kph (75 mph).
    Children under 12 are not permitted to sit in the front seat. Driving with parking lights is prohibited. Use headlights in heavy rain or poor visibility and in road tunnels--they are compulsory. Always carry your valid license and car-registration papers; there are occasional roadblocks to check them. Wear seat belts in the front seat--they are required.

    To use the main highways, you must display a disk or vignette in the lower left-hand corner of the windshield. You can buy it at the border (cash only; neighboring foreign currencies can be changed). It costs 40 SF, can be purchased from any post office, and is valid to the end of the year. Cars rented within Switzerland already have these disks; if you rent a car elsewhere in Europe, ask if the company will provide the vignette for you.

    Tune in to Swiss Radio 1 at around 7 PM for traffic updates in English, or dial 120 or 163 for bulletins and advance information in Swiss languages.

    REQUIREMENTS
    In Switzerland your own driver's license is acceptable--but consider buying an International Driver's Permit, available from the American or Canadian automobile associations, or, in the United Kingdom, from the AA or RAC. Some European rental firms will not lease to drivers over 70 years old.
    CAR RENTAL
    The major car-rental companies represented in Switzerland are Alamo (tel. 800/327-9633; in the U.K., 0800/272-2000), Avis (tel. 800/331-1084; in Canada, 800/879-2847), Budget (tel. 800/527-0700; in the U.K., 0800/181181), Dollar (tel. 800/800-4000; in the U.K., 0990/565656, where it is known as Eurodollar), Hertz (tel. 800/654-3001; in Canada, 800/263-0600; in the U.K., 0345/555888), and National InterRent (sometimes known as Europcar InterRent outside North America; tel. 800/227-3876; in the U.K., 01345/222-525). Rates in Switzerland begin at $28 a day and $142 a week for an economy car with unlimited mileage. This does not include tax on car rentals, which is 6.5%.



    By Mass Transit
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    Geneva has an excellent network of trams, buses, and trolleybuses, extremely efficient and remarkably inexpensive; the schematic maps are relatively easy to follow. Every bus stop has a machine selling tickets, and for 2.20 SF you can use the system for one hour, changing as often as you like. Children 6 to 16 years, women over 62, and men over 65 travel half price. A trip limited to three stops, with return within 30 minutes, costs 1.50 SF. If you plan to travel frequently, buy a carte journalière, a ticket covering unlimited travel within the city center all day for 5 SF; it's available at newsstands that display a 'transports publics genevois (tpg)' sign near the stop. Holders of the Swiss Pass can travel free on Geneva's public transport system.


    By Taxi
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    Taxis (tel. 022/321-22-23, 022/794-71-11, or 022/331-41-33) can be immaculate and the drivers are polite, but there's a 5 SF charge per passenger plus 2 SF per kilometer (about a half mile), and you may find yourself waiting in slow traffic while pedestrians flow by. There's a surcharge on evening and Sunday fares as well.

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