Zermatt Transportation

  • At Zermatt
    At Zermatt
    by MikeBird
  • Before the customers arrived
    Before the customers arrived
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  • Village on route
    Village on route
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Most Recent Transportation in Zermatt

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Glacier Express....

    by Maryimelda Updated Aug 1, 2013

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    Colourful carriages.....
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    The Glacier Express is very plush and comfortable even in second class, but I would have seen just as much on regional trains and saved 30CHF which was the supplement I paid with my Swiss Flexi Pass.
    It wasn't the relaxing journey I had imagined, as there was frantic activity happening all the time, mainly concerned with serving lunch at the seat for anyone who had 41CHF to spare. I chose to bring my own lunch but I would guess that about 80% of the passengers pre-order the lunch on board. This means that between going around setting each place with all the necessary table linen, cutlery, wine glasses etc, delivering the meal (two to three courses) and dishing it up at the seat, collecting the dirty dishes and generally cleaning up, the whole journey consists of countless staff going up and down the aisle and constantly bumping the poor people (such as I) who are sitting in the aisle seats. Then of course, there is the lady who comes along with the trolley and the credit card machine and sells the many and varied souvenirs and we mustn't forget the ticket inspector and finally the staff coming around to collect the money for the lunch just in the nick of time before the train pulls into your destination. It's one of those "been there, done that, got the T-shirt" kinda things. I certainly wouldn't do it again.

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  • MikeBird's Profile Photo

    Much more than a train ride- the Glacier Express

    by MikeBird Written Feb 28, 2013

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    Spectacular views en route
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    I'd been inspired to book a trip on the Glacier Express after I went to a talk by a travel company representative who led a group around Switzerland by train. Rather than pay the premium for the expensive hotels, the cost of the rep and all the fancy marketing I decided I could do a similar trip in January 2013 for much less. I think I achieved my goal and had a really great time as well.

    The Glacier Express runs daily from Zermatt in the west to St Moritz in the east of Switzerland and also in the opposite direction. I had bought a Swiss Rail Pass for all my train travel whilst in the country and so all I had to pay was a supplement of 13CHF to reserve my seat. In addition you can book a lunch - either 3 courses - or just a main meal. I only wanted the single course which was 30CHF ( drinks were extra). Lunch was a very tasty Beef Stroganoff. They even came round with seconds for everyone. Your food is served at your seat and you can tuck in whilst watching the wonderful scenery unfold before you.

    I did think the staff on board seemed just a bit harrassed and not particularly friendly but the service was generally efficient. They served drinks, including alcoholic ones throughout the trip.

    Each customer is given a pair of small earphones and you can plug them into the armrest to receive a commentary in your language about the places and features of interest along your journey.

    I booked my trip via the easy to use Glacier Express website (see below).

    I decided to break my journey after about 5 hours on board and disembarked at Chur. The following day I had booked the second leg to journey from Chur down to Milan via the Italian border town of Tirano. See my other tips about the Bernina Express from my Chur page.

    There is one word of warning for those of you who may not be keen photographers and who, like me, are happy to use small compact cameras. To my disappointment I found that there was a lot of reflection from the windows on my photographs so you may end up with shadows and ghosts that somehow get in the way of the spectacular photographic vistas you will see from the train. You may be able to adjust for this but it wasn't until I returned home that I discovered this had happened. You have been warned.

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    The Gornergrat Bahn

    by travelfrosch Updated Aug 5, 2012

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    View from the GGB train window
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    One of the highlights of many trips to Zermatt is to take the Gornergrat Bahn (GGB) rack railway. Trains depart every 24 minutes from the GGB train station, across the street from the main train station. The 40-45 minute ride will take you up to the Gornergrat and its observatory. From there, you can get magnificent views of the surrounding mountains.

    Another option, instead of taking the train all the way to the top, is to stop at one of the intermediate stations and hike around the area. One of our favorite trips is to get off at Riffelalp and hike along the ridge to the Stellisee and the Unterer Rothorn.

    As of August 2012, fares are CHF 40 per person one-way Zermatt to Gornergrat, CHF 80 round trip. One-way fare to Riffelalp is CHF 18. You get a 50% discount with Swisspass, Swiss Card, and "Halbtax" (half-fare card). 25% discount with Eurailpass valid in Switzerland. Check the website for details on passes and special sunrise excursions.

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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Electric Taxi

    by Roadquill Written Dec 28, 2011

    Zermatt does not allow most cars and trucks into town (although there were some special delivery and maintenance trucks). Taxis take you up the mountain or you can take the train. Once at the train station you have to switch to electric taxis.

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  • travelfrosch's Profile Photo

    The Matterhorn-Gotthard Bahn

    by travelfrosch Updated Nov 12, 2011

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    An MGB train approaches
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    The only way to get to Zermatt, other than hiking, is by train. Even if you drive, cars are not allowed in Zermatt. You have to park in Täsch and take a "pendelzug" (shuttle train) to Zermatt (CHF 15.60 return).

    The private railway used to be known as the BVZ (Brig-Visp-Zermatt) Bahn, running, as you might expect, from Brig to Visp to Zermatt. The railway recently merged with the Furka Oberalp (FO) railway (formerly responsible for service from Brig to Disentis) to form the Matterhorn-Gotthard Bahn (MGB). The MGB runs a section of the "Glacier Express," a scenic train running between Zermatt, Brig, Disentis, Andermatt, Chur, and St. Moritz. But we're interested in the journey to Zermatt.

    From Brig, the narrow-gauge train slowly winds its way up the Mattertal for the 80-minute ride to Zermatt. To board the train, exit the train station at Visp (or Brig, if you're coming from Milan/Domodossola or Kandersteg) and walk to the "MGB" station (just outside the Brig and Visp main railway station) to await your connecting train.

    RAILPASS VALIDITY: If you have a Eurailpass, select pass, or multi-country pass, the MGB does not honor your pass. You'll have to go to the ticket counter and purchase a ticket (CHF 68 2nd class return from Brig, CHF 66 from Visp). However, if you have a Swisspass, you're in luck, as this family of passes is valid on these private railways. While a few trains are 1st class only, you generally don't need reservations to get to Zermatt. If you travel towards Disentis, however, reservations are compulsory on most trains, and cost about CHF 8 extra, even with a Swisspass.

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  • Schaller Grampi Taxi in Zermatt

    by swisshoneymooner Written Sep 26, 2011

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    I am currently staying in Zermatt and just had a TERRIBLE experience with these taxis. Not only are they absolutely substandard in quality and service but on top of it the driver is overcharging.

    The driver was rude, arrogant and didn't bother to offer a somewhat comfortable ride in this old metal can of a taxi.

    I have always had positive experiences with taxi24. the rates are always at the same fair level, the cars are clean and comfortable and the drivers are helpful and polite.

    Just my advice, stay away from the old, blue taxis Schaller / Grampi.

    You've been warned.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Riffelalp tram

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Riffelalp tram

    If you stop at Riffelalp on your way to/from Gornergrat you may see a small tram. This red tram departs from Riffelalp station, and takes guests along the road to the 5 star hotel, Riffelalp Resort 2222.

    The Riffelalp tram is special as it is the highest tramway in Europe. The tram first operated in 1899, but was damaged by fire in the 1950's. Years later the tram was resurrected and since 2001 it has been running again.

    Primarily built to transport guests of the 5 star hotel, it is open to non-guests as well for a small charge (2 CHF in July 2008). Don't get too comfortable though, the track is only 675m long.

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  • VA_Dave's Profile Photo

    Helicopter ride around the Matterhorn

    by VA_Dave Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The helicopter holds 4 people plus the pilot
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    On our last day of skiing Zermatt in February 2006, we decided to take a 20 minute helicopter ride around the Zermatt valley including a loop around the Matterhorn. It was worth every penny of the $200/person cost.

    As we circled the Materhorn, we saw climbers on the difficult North face route. Our pilot said they had been on the route 10 days waiting out a storm, and this was the first good day for them to resume climbing.

    The helicopter landed on a high ridge near the Matterhorn, between Switzerland and Italy. I got out with my skis and took the beautiful 15 km ski run down into Italy to Cervinia. Then I took a series of gondolas back up to Monte Rosa, and
    skied back down into the Zermatt valley in time to catch the afternoon train back to Geneva.

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  • Tripack's Profile Photo

    Cable car story (1st part)

    by Tripack Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Brand new cablecar... in 1930

    Swiss Cable Car story...

    Discover the alpine world was formerly the privilege of the warriors, the tradesmen and the wealthy people. Thanks to the technical development, for a few decades, the mountain has been accessible to everyone. The first installations of transport to cables were built at the end of the 19th century. From this beginning to the funitels, the development of the technique of the ski lifts is a part of the Swiss tourism history.

    Pionner period (1866-1915)

    The first cable car was built in 1866 on the Falls of the Rhine close to Schaffhausen. The drive of the installation built by Johann Jakob Rieter was done... with a crank.
    The first funicular of Switzerland connected Lausanne to Ouchy in 1877.
    In 1900, the Swiss territory counted already 26 installations (cable cars or funiculars). An act pioneer was the construction in 1908 of Wetterhorn cable car close to Grindelwald - the first cable car of the world to transport people.

    Stagnation (1915-1945)

    Alpine tourism had been launched at the 19th century by English who came in Switzerland to go skiing and to enjoy mountain’s excursions. The 1928 Winter Olympics in Saint-Moritz gave a popular rush for the winter sports and consequently to the ski lifts development. But soon the economic crisis and the Second World War delayed this rise.

    Boom and euphoria (1945-1979)

    The post-war economic period knew a boom for the ski lifts manufacturers supported the fast expansion of the winter sports. So in the Fifties and Sixties a considerable number of spaces favourable for the winter sports were available. The ski became a popular sport. Between 1955 and 1975 two thirds of the winter sports resorts of the Swiss mountains were open.

    To be continued on part 2...

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  • Tripack's Profile Photo

    Alpine metro

    by Tripack Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Metro in the Alps

    Operating since 1980, the Sunnegga Express was the first Swiss funicular built entirely in tunnel to transport the skiers up to the tracks from Zermatt to Sunnegga.

    At Sunnegga, the top station, you could enjoy a superb panoramic view to the Matterhorn and the Alps. You could easily continue with gondolas and an aerial cable way to reach the Rothorn (3'100 m).

    At the bottom station, you must walk through a 150 meters horizontal tunnel and go through a automatic door which avoid a airflow call (the cheminee effect). Finally you will reach the funicular composed of 10 compartments for 20 passengers each.

    Technical datas:
    Lower station Zermatt (1'599 m)
    Top station Sunnegga (2'288 m)
    Length 1'545 m
    Difference of levels 698 m
    Average Gradient 48,7 %
    Maximum Gradient 63,3 %
    Time of a ride 3 minutes
    Speed 10 m/s
    Capacity 2 cabins of 200 passengers
    Transport 2'600 passengers by hour

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  • eurotravels's Profile Photo

    Leave your car at Visp

    by eurotravels Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We left the car in the spacious car park at Visp and caught the train. We found the journey was easy. It is not possible to drive to Zermat as the only vehicles allowed are electrically powered.
    Timetables and prices are on the Website http://www.bvz.ch/timetableandfares.phpe.
    You need to click on the link Brig-Zermatt.

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  • Tripack's Profile Photo

    Gornergrat Monte Rosa Bahn (Zermatt - Gornergrat)

    by Tripack Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Gornergrat train by Trip@ck

    Experience the fascination of the unique natural scenery at 3'089 m above sea level. The GGB Gornergrat-Monte Rosa-Bahnen transport you from Zermatt to the Gornergrat vantage platform in about 42 minutes. Around you rise 29 four-thousand-meter-high mountains laden with snow and ice. The second longest ice stream of the Alps, the Gorner Glacier, is at your feet and an extensive hiking area is waiting to be explored by you.

    For bikers there is a choice of four different routes and early risers on sunrise rides are rewarded with a unique atmosphere.

    Prices (Zermatt - Gornergrat return, 2nd class):
    Adult CHF 67.- EUR 45.-
    Half fare card CHF 34.- EUR 23.-
    Child (6-16y.) CHF 34.- EUR 23.-

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  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Electric Taxis.....

    by Maryimelda Updated Feb 28, 2010

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    Electric Taxis outside the Bahnhof.....

    Zermatt is a car free town and only electric cars are allowed. These taxis are governed by all sorts of laws that forbid them using the main street at certain times of the day. Hence you can pay quite a bit to get from the Bahnhof to your hotel if the poor blighter has to go the long way around. I paid 12CHF to get to my hotel when I arrived and I walked back to the Bahnhof in 7 minutes when I was leaving. So, if you can find out exactly where your hotel is situated (and most of them are within walking distance of the bahnhof) and if you have luggage that is not too cumbersome, then I recommend that you walk.
    Having said that, you may still need to get a taxi. When you come out of the main entrance to the Bahnhof, you will find them lined up to your right. Some of them belong to certain hotels, so lucky for you if your hotel is one of those.

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  • Tripack's Profile Photo

    How to access to this car free resort

    by Tripack Updated Nov 24, 2009

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    Access map
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    Zermatt is a car-free resort. Access for private transport is only allowed as far as Täsch (5km from Zermatt). You could let your car at the Matterhorn Terminal Täsch (New Park and Rail car park completed in 2007) for CHF 13.50 per day. Shuttle trains operated from Tasch to Zermatt (trip of 12 minutes) run every 20 minutes. Return ticket CHF 15.20 (or CHF 7.60 with half fare card).

    At Visp Railway station about 100 free carpark is available, but train trip costs more than from Täsch and duration trip is about 1 hour.

    Insider tip: Do not forget to give a quick free call from the Tasch railway station thanks to the hotels board. Somebody will waiting for you at our arrival ;-)

    It is easy to get around in Zermatt. Most distances can easily be covered on foot.
    In winter the bus service is included in the ski-pass : two routes with electrically-powered buses serve all major intersections.

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  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Other modes of transport...

    by Maryimelda Written Oct 24, 2009

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    Why has he got his back legs crossed?
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    There are buses that will take you to neighbouring towns. These leave regularly from across the road in front of the bahnhof. There are also horse and buggies that are available to use in much the same way as a taxi. Enlarge the photo of the horse and buggy to see what I mean by the caption.

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Zermatt Transportation

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