Basel Local Customs

  • Graettimaa
    Graettimaa
    by Airpunk
  • Laeckerli Huus
    Laeckerli Huus
    by csordila
  • Autumn Fair at Petersplatz
    Autumn Fair at Petersplatz
    by german_eagle

Best Rated Local Customs in Basel

  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Vogel Gryff

    by Myndo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vogel Gryff

    the "Bird Griffin" - Vogel Gryff seems to be yet another of the dragons in Basel.
    It is one of the three Signs of the three "Ehrengesellschaften" of Basel. Guilds would be the english word (thank you JTF). They come from the old Zuenfte, where the Workers of Basel were put together. That was some sort of a union to help the workers.

    The three Ehrengesellschaften / guilds are:
    Rebhaus, Greifen and Haeren. They are represented at the "Vogel Gryff" Event through: the "Wild Maa" (wild man), "Vogel Gryff" (the Bird Griffin) and the Leu (Lion).

    The Vogel Gryff is a thing of the smaller Basel (Kleinbasel).
    The three Representants in their costumes are coming together, dancing in front of several buildings and going down the Rhine until the Middle Bridge on a raft.
    The Gryff is not really a bird. It is that fabulous animal like seen in the newest Harry Potter, and it is often shown with four legs.A Griffin like in Griffindor

    This "Vogel Gryff" festival is a tradition with many aspects.
    When they are dancing, three Uelis are collecting money. The Uelis, that also belong to the three Ehrengesellschaften, are or white/green. There is a forth one white/black since 1937. They were collecting money for the widows and orphans of the members of the unions (there wasn't always the social state like today). Today the money they get (also over shecks) is still used for social institutions in the smaller Basel.

    Another interesting thing is the Wild Man (see tip there).

    The bigger Basel didn't like this festival, so they made and hung up a face that is showing its tongue to the smaller Basel. The "Laellekoenig" (Tongue - king). You can find that face on the Middle bridge looking at the side of the smaller Basel....

    Start of this local event is around 10:30 (depends on the water in the Rhine)
    2005 it will be on January 13th.

    (The website is only in german)

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    The Laellekoenig (Tongue King)

    by Myndo Updated Jul 5, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Laellekoenig

    Laelle (lälle) is an old word for tongue.
    The Tongue-King is a stone face showing its tongue to the Small Basel.
    You can find it at the Middle Bridge (Mittlere Brücke).

    It was hanging on the big doorway at the bigger Basel end of the bridge.
    The original was made of copper with a crown and had a clockwork in it, so it would roll its eyes and show the red tongue to the other side of the Rhine.
    That original one can still be found in the Historical Museum in Basel. Now we have a stone face.

    Now why would someone hang something like that up?
    Big Basel and Small Basel were concurring in the old times. When the smaller Basel "invented" the Vogel Gryff and its festival, that was bigger Basels answer...

    You can find that face at the facade of the house at Schifflaende 1. But also in othe places.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Wild Maa at Vogel Gryff

    by Myndo Updated Jul 5, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wild Maa

    The Wild Maa (wild man) is another of the three Representants of the three Ehrengesellschaften of the smaller Basel. (see under Vogel Gryff tip)

    For a child is it an impressive and maybe frightening figure. It wears a crown and belt of ivy with apples in it and it is swinging a smaller tree ....

    But the apples are special. The children are trying to "steal" one of them from the Wild Maa....
    And if you are a woman and happen to get one of them as a present from the Wild Maa it is said that you are going to be pregnant - and soon!

    7 kgs of apples the wild man has on him - but as you see in the picture they are all already gone ... so maybe he is not so a bad guy at all?
    But uiuiui that tree can stitch if you happen to get to careless!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    FCB - Football Club Basel

    by Myndo Written Jul 25, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    FCB flag on the Rathouse

    I am not much into football (or soccer as the americans say), but it is really hard in these times to get around it.

    FCB, that is our local Football Club, is playing well enough to attract a lot of fans.
    They are Schweizermeister (best swiss football club) this year and 2002. 4-5 players do also play in the National Team.

    So, do not be astounded to find the flag in red, blue and yellow almost everywhere - even on the Rathaus on the Market Place (see pic).

    Its not only the flag, almost every third car from Basel and surrroundings has the sticker on it.

    When they have a match at their local stadion (St. Jakob), the area is closed for cars - and you better not need a parking space right then.

    Related to:
    • Casino and Gambling

    Was this review helpful?

  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Berri-Mailbox

    by german_eagle Written Nov 5, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Berri-Mailbox

    I noticed there are some mailboxes in Basel with special design. One of them I saw at the former city gate Spalentor, another next to the so called Stadthaus (corner Schneidergasse and Totengässlein), and yet another in Riehen near the parish church.

    They were designed by Melchior Berri (1801-54), one of the most important architects of Classicism in Switzerland. He built e.g. the building for the Museum on Natural History close to the Münster church. He also created the stamp called Basler Dybli (Dybli = Basel dialect for pigeon). The "Dybli" is to see on the mailbox as well (see picture).

    Was this review helpful?

  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Basel Autumn Fair

    by german_eagle Written Nov 5, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Autumn Fair at Petersplatz
    4 more images

    The Basel Autumn Fair (Herbstmess) is the oldest and largest fun fair in Switzerland, going back to the 15th century. It is great fun for young and old, families, groups of kids as well as seniors.

    You'll see antique carousels as well as top-modern highflyers (see pics 1 and 4), booths selling things from delicious food (cheese, meat, chocolate etc) to anything you need or do not need. The fair is spread all over the old town to both sides of the river. I particularly liked the Petersplatz area right in front of my hotel. Not too loud, good food, beautiful antique carousel (pic 1). The young crowds prefered the Münsterplatz, Kasernenareal, Barfüsserplatz where the top-modern and more exciting attractions were.

    The fair begins 14 days prior to St. Martin's Day and ends the third Sunday evening afterward. It is open at Petersplatz 11 - 20 h, at the other places until 22 h, on Fridays and Saturdays until 23 h.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Festivals
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    St Nikolaus Day, December 6

    by Kathrin_E Updated Dec 8, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Harley Santa Claus parade
    2 more images

    St Nikolaus ("Samichlaus") Day, December 6, is an important event in Basel. It's worth visiting the city on that day if you want some additional pre-Christmas flair and do some Nikolaus-spotting. The Nikolaus's dress is usually the same as Santa Claus's. Only those who 'work' for churches will wear a more bishop-like outfit that resembles more the original Saint Nikolaus, bsihop of Myra.

    The city is full of Santa Clauses that day. They are everywhere. In the shops, of course, for advertising reasons. In boats on the Rhine. In the streets. On horse-drawn carriages. Visiting churches. And... on motorbikes. Not any plain average motorbikes but heavy Harley Davidsons.

    At 5 p.m. the city centre stops its shopping activities, people line up on the sidewalks to see the "Harley Niggi-Näggi" parade. I guess it's a local Harley club who does the parade. Some two dozen bikers dress up and decorate their bikes with incredible imagination.

    See my travelogues for more pictures.

    Related to:
    • Motorcycle
    • Festivals
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    1st of August: Ntl Holidays

    by Myndo Updated Aug 1, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    high fire on top of Hill

    The first of August is the National holiday.
    On this day most shops are closed - as if it was a sunday.
    Most festivities will be held on the evening before, though. Maybe because the next day (August 2nd) we have to work normally again.

    So on 31st July in the evening there are fireworks in many cities all over switzerland.
    If you want to see the (quite big) one in Basel, you just have to go to the border of the Rhine or one of the brides.
    Many stands will provide you with food and drink.

    If you rather like to have it more quiet, choose one of the suburban villages. Some of them, like Muttenz have high fires. That is they make big fires on the top of the hills. (See picture).

    To get there you will have to walk a bit, though. Uphill. No cars allowed. Bring your own food and drink.
    On the plus side you can watch the fireworks in the city and the villages around from up here.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • csordila's Profile Photo

    Have you ever nibbled a famous laeckerli?

    by csordila Updated Mar 26, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Laeckerli Huus

    While walking around Basel I discovered the Laeckerli Huus with its famous Laeckerli, which is a kind of original Basel speciality.
    "Lecker" means "delicious" in German. That small gingerbread biscuit is composed of many ingredients like honey, almonds, nuts, orangeat, zitronat, kirsch and some spices.
    The name " Laeckerli" emerges only around 1720, however the popular biscuit was offered already much earlier in good "Bürgerhaeusern" during Advent time.
    Nowadays Laeckerli are consumed year round in the Basel area and you can find several stores in the city.

    One of the shops, where you can buy it in all variations and gift-wrap:

    Laeckerli Huus, Gerbergasse 57
    Opening times Mon-Thu: 9am - 8pm, Fri: 9am - 10pm, Sat: 8am - 5pm,

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • Trash Day

    by LrSorr Written Jun 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    There is a scheduled pick up time for all your disposables. Locals would put them out in the curb and the bags must be purchased from the city itself. Prices vary based on the size of the these bags.

    In the U.S. or at least where I live, the city provides a huge barrell where we can dump as much trash as we want and the city dumptruck will come once a week to empty the barrell.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Christmas Market

    by Kathrin_E Written Mar 8, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Christmas market this is one of the wider lanes
    4 more images

    Basel's Christmas market takes place in Barfüßerplatz and around Barfüßerkirche. It is an enjoyable market. The stalls offer a lot of unique arts and crafts in good quality, in addition to a wide variety of food and drink.

    The only disadvantage: the lanes between the rows of stalls are narrow, too narrow for normal late afternoon crowds. They fill up quickly and then squeezing through is not pleasant any more. Come in daytime hours, before about 3 p.m.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Women's Travel
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

  • thinking's Profile Photo

    Traditionally Swiss & Insights for Outsiders

    by thinking Written Jul 23, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Basel on the Rhine

    William Tell is the National hero in Switzerland. His incredibly courageous act (shooting an apple on his son’s head with a cross bow) is said to be the catalyst for the founding of Switzerland.

    The Austrians assigned a man named Gessler to overlook their interests here. In an attempt to assess the loyalty to the Hapsburgers, Gessler placed his hat on a spike in the town square of Altdorf. All people were expected to bow to this hat before passing. William Tell and his son were passing one day and did not bow. With the intention of making an example out of William Tell, Gessler decided that his punishment would be to utilize his skill as a marksman against him instead of imprisoning him. Therefore, he placed Tell’s son against a tree, balanced an apple on his head and paced of 50 paces. Tell was expected to spear the apple with an arrow fired from his trusty crossbow. Tell loaded 2 arrows into the crossbow – took aim – and - as we are all aware, hit the target exactly. But this is not the end of the story….. Gessler was curious as to why Tell had loaded 2 arrows. Tell’s reply was simple, the second arrow was for Gessler, should his first arrow harm his son.
    Gessler was infuriated and ordered Tell to be imprisoned anyway. On his way to the castle dungeon (located in Kussnacht) Tell ship (sailing across the Lake of Luzern) encountered a storm. Tell managed to save the ship and escape the guards. Tell swam to shore and hid in waiting at the castle in Kussnacht. Upon the arrival of Gessler at the castle, Tell took aim with his crossbow again and ended the rule of Gessler in Switzerland.
    Once the Hapsburger rule was removed, the cantons Uri, Schwyz and Nidwalden signed a document of allegiance. This document, known as the Bundesbrief, was signed on the Ruetli Meadow on August 1st.
    Switzerland grew over the centuries and finally, in 1848, the Confederatio Helvetica was formed with the composition of the Federal Constitution (Bundesverfassung), which is still referred to today.

    Was this review helpful?

  • thinking's Profile Photo

    August 1st is the Swiss holiday

    by thinking Written Jul 23, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What the sausages are for Aussies and the huge steaks are for the Americans, the humble pork chop is for switzies when inviting to a BBQ. Children get a cervelat and the adults indulge in plain pork chops usually served with some salads and crisps or pommes chips, as they are known here.
    Of course I am joking here, about the idea that Swiss people only know to grill chops!!!
    August 1st is our national holiday (as you have certainly learned now by reading this months Insights Column from Robin Daellenbach). This day is for many Swiss people THE occasion to throw a huge BBQ party for family and guests, so why not add a twist this time with these recipes for “differently” stuffed pork chops.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Fasnacht - Basel's So Special Carnival

    by Kathrin_E Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Basel Fasnacht

    I am astonished to see that VT's opulent Basel travel guide does not, so far, contain much about Basel's so special carnival. The Fasnacht is the most famous event in the city.

    Basel locals, please forgive an outsider, who has never really been 'in' it, the description from an outsider's point of view. My experience is limited to two visits on Wednesday for the Courtège. I have to admit that I have not seen the Morgestraich - yet. For 2010, I have just booked myself a room for three nights and then I will be there and see it all.

    Basel celebrates its carnival one week later than the usual carnival date. How come? The Lent is officially 40 days. When counting from Ash Wednesday to Easter you end up with 46 days, not 40. At some point in history the catholic church decided that Sundays are holidays and shall not be counted as fasting days, so the duration of the Lent is counted as 40 days plus 6 Sundays. Protestant Basel and other parts of Northwestern Switzerland refused to join and stuck with the old date, 40 days before Easter including the Sundays.

    The event begins in the earliest hours of the morning on Monday after Ash Wednesday. At 4 a.m. all the lights in the city are turned off and the Morgestraich starts in the dark streets. Masked groups play flutes and drums and present their illuminated lanterns for the first time.

    After a rest, the big daytime parade, the Courtège, starts at 1:30 p.m. Two circle routes, one clockwise, one counter-clockwise, lead through the city centre.
    Map of Courtège route

    Tuesday is the day of the children and the Guggemusik bands. In the evening, the Schnitzelbängg invade the pubs of the city to tell about last year's events - profound language skills in Baslerdytsch are required.

    Wednesday sees another Courtège parade, again at 1:30 p.m. If staying up all night and being in the streets at 4 in the morning feels too much for you, the Courtèges are an easier and also interesting option to see a bit of Basler Fasnacht in comfortable daytime hours.

    More photos in my travelogues...

    Website: www.fasnachts-comite.ch (in English)

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Festivals
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • csordila's Profile Photo

    The only Protestant carnival in the world

    by csordila Updated Apr 16, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Consulate of Kingdom of Lepmuria

    The carnival is the largest spectacle of Basel since 1376 according to the earliest records. The procession is beginning on the Monday following the Ash Wednesday and last until three day every year. It begins with the traditional Morgenstraich parade. For three days, the city is in turmoil, living to the sound of thousands of piccolos, drums and an atmosphere like no other. On the carnival also the "Kingdom of Lepmuria" probably takes part, which of course is no real place just a carnival group.

    Related to:
    • Festivals

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Basel

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

108 travelers online now

Comments

Basel Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Basel local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Basel sightseeing.

View all Basel hotels