Lauterbrunnen Warnings and Dangers

  • Viewing platform - Schilthorn Mountain
    Viewing platform - Schilthorn Mountain
    by balhannah
  • Slippery!
    Slippery!
    by balhannah
  • Schilthorn
    Schilthorn
    by balhannah

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Lauterbrunnen

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    SLIPPERY SURFACE

    by balhannah Written Nov 1, 2011

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    Slippery!

    When on the viewing platform at Schilthorn, be very careful when you walk if there is Snow on the surface. With people walking on the snow, it had become slushy and slippery, and I found it quite easy to get a wobble up, but didn't fall.
    As you can see in the photo, there was some cleared area, but not all, so for view's on the other side, you had to walk on Snow.

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    LACK OF OXYGEN

    by balhannah Written Nov 1, 2011

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    Viewing platform - Schilthorn Mountain

    This something you need to be aware of when visiting Schilthorn, or any other Mountain.

    I am asthmatic, so I made sure I had my "puffer" with me, and that I was ready for the "thin" air.
    Unfortunately, the Woman infront of us, walked out onto the viewing platform and within a few minutes crashed to the floor. It was frightening to say the least! She was taken inside, and I saw her later, and thank goodness, she was quite alright.

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    WEATHER AT SCHILTHORN MOUNTAIN

    by balhannah Written Nov 1, 2011

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    Schilthorn

    Now, just because it is a lovely, sunny, perfect day down the bottom, doesn't mean it is going to be like that at the top, believe me, we found out!

    It was the perfect day when we left the Stechelberg Cable-Car station. We were enjoying the scenery as we went higher and higher up the Mountain, when all of a sudden, not long after our third change of Gondola at Brig, we were in THICK FOG!
    Imagine our disappointment, and thinking of the large amount of money we had wasted!

    Guess what happened!.............
    We were nearly at the top, and we came out of the clouds and into the Sun again!

    Also, take a warm jacket with you, as it was quite cold at the top!

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    Check weather Forecast - Jungfrau

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 16, 2011

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    Cloud Over Lauterbrunnen Vallay 7:45am
    2 more images

    Visability may be fine down in the Lauterbrunnen Valley, however low clouds can restrict what you can see when at the "Top of Europe" and also from the train there and back.

    We had a 4 night stay in Lauterbrunnen to enhance our chances of a fine day. Arriving late afternoon, the first question we asked at Reception was the weather forecast for tomorrow and how it would be on Jungfrau. We were lucky the forecast was excellent and we had a great time.

    The next day we woke up to very low cloud and light rain, it would have been a terrible day on the mountain. We caught the train to Bern to enjoy a sunny day.

    If the purpose of your holiday is to visit Jungfrau I recommend you book additional days accommodation. Switzerland is so small you can make your base in Lauterbrunnen and take the train elsewhere on rainy days.

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    avalanche dangers

    by MrBill Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    the probe line

    Avalanches are an ever present danger high up in the Alps or even low down in the valleys. Here the National Ski Patrol is practicing a probe line. Literally poking poles systematically to locate a buried avalance victim.

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    always wear suncream

    by MrBill Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    source:  www.pizbuin.com

    Do not forget your sun lotion. You should always have it on. Not only does it protect your skin against harmful UV rays, but also against drying out in the wind and cold. Most ski instructors and ski patrollers have dried leather for skin when they get older. You want to protect yourself with a high UV factor suncream. Apply generously. After sweating heavily, re-apply. Re-apply at lunchtime as well. Wear a ball cap with a brim. Don't forget the sun bounces off the snow as well as comes from above, so don't forget to apply behind your ears, under your chin, on your neck, your wrists and hands if they are exposed, etc. Each square inch of skin should be covered with clothing or sun cream. The sun is stronger than you think at 3000m.

    ''During the winter time use double the sun protection factor than during the summer time. The UV rays are being reflected by snow and ice and also intensified by 13% per 1000 meters altitude. Moreover 80% of UV radiation is reflected by snow and sand.

    Dehydration is one of the main problems for the skin in winter due to dry air and cold temperatures. It may induce redness, chapping and cracks in the skin and can also worsen premature skin ageing. This is even more the case if you practice snow sports as wind and cold can further dehydrate your skin. Use a sun protection cream specially designed for winter, with appropriate protection against UV radiation as well as against dry skin, cold and wind" Source: www.pizbuin.com

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    Beware of Traffic Jams

    by riorich55 Written Dec 23, 2008

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    Can't Wait to Try Some of the Cheese from The Cows

    I was going to say Beware of Traffic "Milks", but I wasn't sure everyone would understand my sense of humor or lack of it. Anyway, if you are lucky enough and it is the right time of year you may get caught walking the streets with the cows coming down from the mountain in the autumn. This picture was taken during the 2nd week of October as we walked through the Village of Murren, above the Lauterbrunnen Valley. While I was shooting the video of this, my wife walking a little behind me got this great picture of not only the cows with their bells, but also the local farmer which reminded me of the movie Heidi.

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    Tired Feet

    by riorich55 Written Oct 16, 2008

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    Taking a break

    Got Ya!! I know when I started looking at VT pages almost a year ago now I would constantly check the warning or danger areas of places we were going to visit to get a different perspective of what to watch out for (i.e. - beggars, pickpockets, etc). All good hints by the way.

    I thought that my warning tip for Lauterbrunnen should be to sit back kick your socks and shoes off and just mellow in the beauty of it all. Yes, your feet will be tired from all the walking you will do, but yours eyes also need to rest from looking all around you while taking in everything around you.

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  • lazyman_1's Profile Photo

    Sun block

    by lazyman_1 Written Feb 15, 2007

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    If your traveling up to the Jungfrau, because of all the ice and snow and overall cold, you probably won't be thinking of sunblock, however on a clear day you also have to deal with the sun reflecting off the snow which means you'll be exposed to more UV rays than if you were at the bottom of the mountian so be prepared and apply some sun block if you head up the mountain.

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  • MrBill's Profile Photo

    carry a shovel in your knapsack

    by MrBill Written Jul 28, 2004

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    Ortovox adjustable shovel

    I usally carry a shovel, probe poles, a first aid kit, a water bottle, a Swiss Army knife or Leatherman, a whisle, fruit & granola bars, gum, lip balm, sunblock, a dry under layer, ski goggles, an emergency blanket, and a water proof cushion to sit on in my 25-litre knapsack. And, sometimes my 0.5 litre thermos of coffee if its cold. Drinking warm water is better than cold water when it is cold out.

    I wear my gortex outlayer - ski pants and ski jacket with hood - with the following layered underneath.

    Synthetic=Polyester-nylon-wool blend.

    Synthetic socks, underwear, t-shirt, shirt, fleece or fleece vest, and then I take off what I do not need and keep it my knapsack. I wear thick, jockey short style underwear for a little extra warmth for sitting on those cold chairlifts.

    Of course, if it Springtime I might wear lighter variations, but on a glacier you have to be prepared for minus 20 degrees to above zero and sunny and warm. The best is to wear layers and be prepared to change often. You want to avoid sweating profusely and then freezing, which is not easy when you are working hard. Therefore, it is not good to be dressed too warm, but good to have extra clothes in your pack.

    I have switched to a 3-in-1 glove system. The outer, leather and gortex glove has very little insulation and is ideal most of the time. When I am ski touring or cross country skiing, I often only wear the glove liners. Then if it is cold, they can be combined. They are so light, I always have them with me in my pack.

    Good sunglasses are a must. As is a hat and or a touque depending on how cold and windy it is. I wear a ski hat, as normal ballcaps will blow off with a sudden gust of wind or when you are skiing. Also, ski hats have ear flaps which make me look like Elmer Fudd, but I can accept that.

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    wear an avalanche transceiver

    by MrBill Written Jul 28, 2004

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    Ortovox transmitter & receiver

    Serious skiers never go off-piste alone. They always ski in groups. Each member of the group should have an avalanche transceiver (make sure its turned on and you know how to use it), avalanche probe poles, and a shovel. Usually, you have these in your knapsack along with your first aid kit, a Swiss Army knife, a bottle of water, and some food. Each time you go out on the mountain, you should be prepared to spend a night on the mountain in an emergency. Therefore, it is also good to carry extra dry clothing, especially a dry underlayer, which is light, but worth its weight in gold on a cold day and even more when you are forced to overnight on the mountain.

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    at 3000m the Calvary don't ride horses

    by MrBill Updated Jul 28, 2004

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    help arrives on skis

    Rega is in operation for you 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, both in Switzerland and abroad. Whether you have taken ill or suffered an accident, you can count on rapid, uncomplicated assistance from the air.

    Source: www.rega.ch

    Air Glaciers
    3822 Lauterbrunnen
    Tel. +41 33 8 560 560
    agl@airglacier.ch
    performs the same air rescue services as Rega.

    Dial 1414 or 1415 within Switzerland. TIP. save the number into your mobile phone just in case you need it, but don't count on being able to get reception everywhere in the Alps.

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    don't let this be you

    by MrBill Written Jul 28, 2004

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    not the way to end the day

    If you are unlucky or careless enough to be caught in an avalanche you may up this way. You may be wishing you had purchased medical insurance too, as airlifts and rescues are paid-for-services and not free like in many parts of N. America where it is provided by the local ski area. In Europe, there is no out of bounds, so you are free to decide to go where you wish, but you are also responsible for your choices. No one to sue here. So you are on your own. Take extra medical coverage including extraction insurance just in case.

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    digging like heck - a race against time

    by MrBill Written Jul 28, 2004

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    12-minute time limit

    Once the victim has been located, they still need to be dug-out and it is a race against time, as the victim cannot go longer than 12-minutes without oxygen without causing irreversible brain damage or death. Also, hypothermia is a real danger when buried in snow for long periods of time.

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    • Skiing and Boarding

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  • Nelson1979's Profile Photo

    In winter never go alone

    by Nelson1979 Written Jun 7, 2004

    When you are here in the mountains in winter stay on the paths and dont go out exploring on your own.... It can be dangerous and when i was there somebody fell off a cliff and died because he got lost and was alone and in the dark he didnt see where he was walking

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    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Skiing and Boarding

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