Pontresina Local Customs

  • Entrabce of a school
    Entrabce of a school
    by kokoryko
  • Downhill
    Downhill
    by kokoryko
  • Biking up
    Biking up
    by kokoryko

Most Recent Local Customs in Pontresina

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    Festival: modern and traditional music

    by kokoryko Written Nov 11, 2009

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    Jazz singer
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    During these festival days, walking in the streets you also can listen to music; and there is for all tastes, from traditional bell players to jazz bands.
    Have a snack (don’t eat to much, as you may want to stop at another place!) and listen to Jazz in a backstreet (pictures 1 and 2)
    In the main street, next to the tourist office, you can have the luck to listen to bell players; the couple here played in a humorous way and the kids liked it a lot! (picture 3 and 4).
    So you can walk from one music place to another, watch the market and enjoy the coloured streets (picture 5) of Pontresina during a festival evening!

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    Festival: try the local production

    by kokoryko Written Nov 11, 2009

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    Wonderful cheese
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    Few days a year there are a number of festivals in Pontresina, and in Summer you may have the luck to attend and even participate to one of these events.
    The streets are invaded by stalls with food, local products, musicians. . . . . and it is a pleasure to walk among the locals and tourists, listen to the music, hear the local language (a bit in fact, most people speak an Alemmanic german)
    One evening a street market offered lots of local food like the wonderful Swiss cheeses (picture 1) (there is not only Emmental), and it is hard to resist to the homemade cakes (picture 2).
    Peasants bring their production of dry sausages, cheeses, jams (picture 3), and only the plastic foils (which are compulsory for some hygienic reason) to wrap the produces give some “modernity” to the stalls! Other guys disguise as dwarves or other fairies to help convince the clients to buy dry apple slices (picture 4), but at the end, if you do not intend to carry lots of food back home, best is to find a seat at one of the tables some retailers install and to have Bratwurst, local pizza, or other foodstuffs (picture 5).
    Lots more can be found at these markets and strolling around and having a seat for a snack gives you a plunge in the local life!

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    Scooters and bikes

    by kokoryko Written Nov 11, 2009

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    Entrabce of a school
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    We may have biased opinions about bikers and biking. . . . Generally, biking friendly areas are plains or at least rather flat areas (Holland, North Germany, etc. . . ); I have to change my opinion: here in Pontresina, are a lot of bikers or young scooter adepts.
    It is not for playing, they are used in every day life, like you can see on picture 1, taken at the entrance of a school! Impressive, and when school is finished, you see the kids in the streets with their vehicles (picture 2). They also go uphill (picture 3)! Bike dealers have big shops on the main street (picture 4), demonstrating that biking is very popular, even in hilly (no mountainous) places of Switzerland! You noticed on the pictures that all bikers wear helmets, but I am not sure they are compulsory, as in Zürich, when I rented a bike, I had no helmet, and the bike renter did not tell me a word about!
    Giving the kids the “taste of biking” very young is a very good idea, indeed, and that can be considered as a local custom!

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    local coustoms

    by singhsomen Written May 29, 2005

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    school children

    The two Engadine customs that continue to be practiced in Pontresina are called Schlitteda and Chalandamarz. The former is a cheerful trip young couples take with horse-drawn sleighs on the second Sunday in January. The latter dates back to Roman times and is practiced on March 1st when Pontresina schoolchildren go around singing and making a lot of noise with bells in an attempt to chase away winter time.

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Pontresina Local Customs

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