Grossmünster Churche, Zürich

62 Reviews

Zwingliplatz (01) 252 5949

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  • Dyesebel's Profile Photo

    The Symbol

    by Dyesebel Updated Sep 6, 2009

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    It's Zürich's Landmark!This church has a religious significance,namely the "burial place" of Felix and Regula,patron saints of Zürich.According to the legend, Charlamagne,( Charles the Great) founded this church after his horse stumbled over their burial site.To get a nice view of Zürich from the top of the Grossmünster Tower,you'll have to walk up 187 steps.

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  • Fam.Rauca's Profile Photo

    The famous towers of the church

    by Fam.Rauca Updated May 24, 2009

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    The two towers of the church maintain the different style elements of the church construction.

    At the base of the towers you can admire the Romanesque style, after that you can observe the Gothic style and the roofs of the towers are made in New Gothic manner.

    The South Tower, called Karlsturm has a statue of Karl der Große on the top.

    The 184 steps bring the visitors on the panorama terrace on the top of the building.

    From here you have a fantastic view over the Lake of Zürich, over the Limmat River, and over the whole city.

    Opening hours Karlsturm
    Summer
    Monday to Saturday – 9:15 am to 5:00 pm
    Sunday 12:30 pm to 5:30 pm
    Winter
    Monday to Saturday – 10:00 am to 4:30 pm
    Sunday – 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm

    The admission price in the Karlsturm is:
    2,- Swiss francs for adults
    1,- Swiss franc for children (6 - 16 Years)

    The famous towers of the church The famous towers of the church The famous towers of the church The famous towers of the church The famous towers of the church
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  • Fam.Rauca's Profile Photo

    Grossmünster Church

    by Fam.Rauca Updated May 24, 2009

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    The wonderful main landmark of Zürich is placed on the right shore of the Limmat River, and its two famous church towers are visible far and wide in the city.

    It is a splendid building at the beginning of the Münster Bridge with a fantastic view over the whole city, from the tower terraces.

    According to legend the first church was built under the order of Karl der Große, on the decapitation’s place of the two City Saints Felix and Regula, buried afterwards in the subgrade of the building.

    The construction of the actually church began at the end of the 11th century, in Romanesque style, and although the inauguration of it was in the year 1220, the many renovations took a long time, and added to the church Gothic and New gothic elements.

    In a niche in the South tower, there is a sculpture that represents a memorial for the king Karl der Goßße, and this tower was called Karl’s Tower.

    Grossm��nster Church Grossm��nster Church Grossm��nster Church Grossm��nster Church Grossm��nster Church
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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Crypt of the Grossmünster Church

    by german_eagle Written Mar 14, 2009

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    The highlight of the Grossmünster Church for me personally was the Romanesque crypt, built 1100-1107. With three naves it is the largest crypt in Switzerland.

    The statue of Charlemagne from the middle of the 15th century dominates the crypt. As impressive as this statue might be - don't miss the remnants of the frescos (Hans Leu T.E. from around 1500) and have a closer look at the capitals of the pillars as well.

    Oh, btw, the acoustics are fantastic, too. I got the rare chance of listening to a musical performance there :-)

    The crypt statue of Charlemagne capital in the crypt
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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Grossmünster Church

    by german_eagle Written Mar 14, 2009

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    The Grossmünster Church is *the* landmark of Zürich. It is the main parish church of the city, famous as the place where the Swiss-German reformation began with Huldrych Zwingli preaching. The history of the building, however, goes back to the early 12th century, the history of churches at this place even to the 8th century.

    What you see nowadays is a mostly late Romesque/early Gothic style church. Baroque additions were (mostly) removed in the 19th century, except for the tops of the spires, which were built in pseudo-gothic style 1781-86.

    I personally like the strict, bare Romanesque/Gothic architecture a lot, others will miss the overwhelming decorations of the Baroque era. Please take your time and watch the beautiful capitals of the pillars. Also, the modern stained glass windows in the choir are well worth to watch, they're made by Augusto Giacometti in 1932/33.

    A highlight is the crypt, please see my next tip for that.

    Opening hours 9 am - 6 pm in summer, 10 am - 5 pm in winter.
    You can climb the southern tower (I did not).

    Grossm��nster Church Southern spire with statue of Charlemagne northern portal main nave, view towards the choir view from choir towards main nave
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Zürich's Main Church

    by Kathrin_E Written Feb 17, 2009

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    Zürich's main parish church is standing on a hill above the river bank. The two steeples with their unique rounded, metal-covered peaks dominate the city panorama. One of them can be climbed (we didn't because the weather was rather dull and not promising of a great view).

    Großmünster isn't and has never been a cathedral, despite its size, but before the reformation it was a collegiate church. Here Zwingli's reformation started. Unfortunately the jube with Zwingli's pulpit is not preserved.
    For architecture specialists, the interior is an interesting example for the end of the Romanesque and the first reluctant beginnings of the new gothic style.

    Don't miss the crypt underneath the choir. If you are lucky and are alone in there (or the rest of the visitors have enough sense for this place to keep quiet, which unfortunately most haven't) you'll feel an atmosphere of eternity. Acoustics are marvelous. If you are able to hold a tune, sing. One very low voice can fill the whole room.

    The church is open in the daytime.

    Grossm��nster Grossm��nster Grossm��nster Grossm��nster, interior
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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Grossmunster

    by sue_stone Written Jul 27, 2008

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    The Grossmunster is Zurich's cathedral. This twin towered cathedral was founded in the 9th century, and is one of the three major churches of the city. The attractive twin towers make it a recognisable landmark of the city. The interior is tastefully decorated and there are some interesting stained glass windows that were added in 1933.

    The main appeal of the Grossmunster for me is that you can climb up one of the towers. Admission is CHF 2, and there are only 187 stairs to climb to reach the viewing platform. The stairs start out in a narrow spiral staircase and then move on to wooden steps the closer you get to the top. The climb is well worth it for the views across Zurich.

    Grossmunster Grossmunster About to climb thr tower View from the tower View from the tower
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  • barbskie's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral's Interior

    by barbskie Updated Jun 8, 2008

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    Cathedral Grossmünster with its three towers is positively looks gigantic betwen the small buildings nearby. Not only the facade is impressive and fascinating but also its interior. Though quite bare inside but the strip of the statues and paintings denounced by Zwingli are interesting. Most of the decorations you see today are replacements, according to the woman who give informations(while we were there). She said, one of them are the pulpit (1851), the choir seats , and the organ (1960). The beautiful stained-glass windows in the choir were made in 1933 by Augusto Giacometti, nephew of Alberto Giacometti, the famous Swiss abstract artist.

    the choir seats The church organ staine window saint on stained glass The pulpit
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  • barbskie's Profile Photo

    Grossmünster Church

    by barbskie Updated Jun 6, 2008

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    A popular landmark to see. No admission charges. Situated at the west bank of the Limmat River between Central and Bellevue Square. Just a walking distance from the Main station and from the Main Street. A former catholic cathedral and now a protestant dating its history back in the 11th century.
    During good weathers, ascending to the tower needs a small fee.

    Grossm��nster interior(Giacomo's work)
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  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Grossmunster

    by pure1942 Written May 14, 2008

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    The Grossmunster on the east bank of the River Limmat has huge historical significance. It was here that Huldrych Zwingli first spoke out against the Catholic Church and initiated the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century.
    A church was founded here in the 9th century under Charlemange but today's Cathedral was built between the 12th and 13th centuries.
    The Cathedral is Romanesque in style and the twin towers of the Cathedral are Zurich's most well known landmarks. the towers were added between 1487 and 1492. The original wooden spires were distroyed by fire in the 18th century which explains the present day Neo-Gothic steeples.

    Grossmunster Grossmunster Grossmunster Grossmunster from Polyterrace Grossmunster from Lindenhof
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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Grossmunster

    by tim07 Updated Mar 31, 2008

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    The twin sugar-loafed towers can be seen throughout the city. The buildings design is well worth a close look at both inside & out. From the top of the towers there are spectacular views of the city & the lake.

    Grossmunster Lake Zurich from Grossmunster Zurich from Grossmunster

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  • heitzenrater's Profile Photo

    Grossmünster, not that "Gross" after all!

    by heitzenrater Written Jan 7, 2008

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    Many people consider the Grossmünster one of the most important buildings in Zurich. It was once Catholic, but now Protestant, and dates back to the 11th Century. The Grossmünster is a fairly tall building 62m / 203 ft

    HOURS:
    Cathedral: Mar 15-Oct daily 9am-6pm; Nov-Mar 14 daily 10am-4pm.
    Towers: Mar-Oct daily (when weather permits); off season Sat-Sun when weather permits. Same hours as cathedral.

    COST:
    Cathedral is free; towers 2F.

    IF YOU LIKE MY POST PLEASE GIVE POSITIVE FEEDBACK, THANKS.

    Grossm��nster, not that

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    The Grossmünster church

    by Gili_S Updated Dec 26, 2007

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    This is the Grossmünster church or cathedral, I am not sure. You can see the twin towers from many parts of the city but with all the building around and the electric cables it is really difficult to take a clear good photo of this church.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Grossmunster

    by Dabs Updated Sep 6, 2007

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    The Grossmunster's history is much more interesting than actually visiting the interior of the church as it is intentionally devoid of ornamentation.

    The legend behind the cathedral is that Charlemagne's horse bowed down at the site of the graves of three Christian martyrs, Felix, Regula and Exuperantius. When these three tried to convert the citizens of Zurich to Christianity, the governor had them boiled in oil and forced to drink molten lead. That apparently didn't kill them so he had them beheaded and they still weren't dead, they carried their heads to the site of the cathedral, dug their own graves and buried themselves.

    Not sure how much of this is true, Charlemagne died in 814 and the cathedral wasn't built until 1090. And I'm a little skeptical about the head carrying, burying yourself thing but it makes for an interesting story.

    Admission to the cathedral is free, if you want to go up to the tower for a view of Zurich there's a small fee.

    Grossmunster Grossmunster

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Grossmunster

    by smirnofforiginal Written Jun 27, 2007

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    You can climb up Grossmunster to gain views of Zurich.
    Inside there is a statue of Charlmagne - the man who founded Grossmunster on the spot where the graves of Felix & Rugla (the two martyrs of the city) were discovered.

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