Pechersk Lavra, Kiev

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    Kievo-Pecherska Lavra

    by Dialing Written Sep 25, 2004

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    Kievo-Pecherska Lavra

    The Pecherskaya Lavra monastery was founded in 11 century. The building continued in for about 9 next centuries. The name Pecherskaya comes from the word "peshera" (cave) which were situated there. The monks used to live in these caves before the monastery was built. And Lavra is a noble name, which was mostly given to big and significant monasteries. The architectural ensemble of the monastery even today makes the great impression. In the sunny day the blinks of many domes and belfries are blinding the eyes - thus singlasses are a must :)

    The most of the buildings in the monastery date from 17-18 century and are the examples of Ukrainian baroque style. From the 12 century there is only one church left (with just few architectural changes conducted later). This is the church above the main entrance gates and it is called "Nadbramna. It's a miracle that this church has remained after all the misfortunes (attacks, wars and fires). It was built in 1106-1108 as the defense tower. The church itself is situated on the second floor above the gates. Its interior is great. The narrow windows, and the general visual effect of movement upwards create the sense of the raised ease. The construction of the church carries the typical features of Ancient Russian architecture.

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  • Kyivo-Pecherska Lavra

    by caprice_222 Written Feb 20, 2004

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    The Kyivo-Pecherska Lavra built almost nine centuries ago. A complex of churches, masterpieces of architecture by themselves, has been a holy place of worship for devoted Christians. Famous for its catacombs with the saints relics, Lavra is also called the Monastery of Caves.

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    Pecherska Lavra Monastery

    by SmileyLeSa Written Feb 26, 2005

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    Pecherska Lavra Monastery

    The term “lavra” is used by the Orthodox Church to mean largest monastery. “Pechera” means cave in Ukranian, thus the name of the monastery. Monks worshiped and lived in these caves and are also buried within the caves. Even today their bodies remain perfectly preserved due to the cool temperatures and humid atmosphere of the caves.

    There is a lot to see in the Pecherska Lavra Monastery including various churches, towers, miles of underground tunnels, ancient crypts, and museums.

    I would recommend setting aside at least a half day, if not a whole day to fully explore this highly historical attraction.

    Hours 10 am – 6 pm
    Closed Tuesdays

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    Kiev Pecherska Lavra Monastery

    by socrates_07 Written Aug 25, 2003

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    Kyivo-Percherska Lavra

    The Dnepro are dominated by Kyiv greatest monument, the Kyivo-Percherska Lavra, built almost nine centuries ago. A complex of churches, masterpieces of architecture by themselfs has been a holy place of worship for devoted Christians. Famous for it?s catacombs with the saints relics, Lavra is also called the Monastery of Caves. Museum collections of miniatures and church treasures amaze vistors from all over the world.

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    Pecherska Lavra

    by iwys Updated Dec 16, 2008

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    Pecherska Lavra is possibly the greatest Christian monastery complex in the world. It was founded nearly a thousand years ago, in 1051, when the first cave chapels were excavated by Orthodox monks in the hills on the right bank of the River Dnieper. Over the centuries, magnificent churches, monastery buildings and belltowers were constructed above the network of cave chapels.

    The main attractions of the Lavra are the Great Lavra Belltower and the Dormition Cathedral, both badly damaged in World War II, but now fully reconstructed. Other churches and cathedrals of the Lavra include the Refectory Church, the Church of All Saints, the Church of the Saviour at Berestove, the Church of the Exaltation of Cross, the Church of the Trinity, the Church of the Nativity of the Virgin, the Church of the Conception of St. Anne and the Church of the Life-Giving Spring. The Lavra complex also contains the St. Nicholas Monastery, the Kiev Theological Academy and Seminary and the Debosquette Wall

    Today this is one of only four UNESCO World Heritage sites in Ukraine.

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    Kyyevo-Pecherska lavra-3

    by Listig Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The monastery was destroyed in 1240 and 1480. In the late 16th centuly it was designated a Lavra (monastery). The architectural ensemble attained completion in the mid-18th century. The majority of the structures is built in the Ukrainian Baroque style.

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    Pecherska Lavra [Caves Monastery]

    by Enzyme_X Written Feb 25, 2006

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    Dormition Cathedral
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    It would be a sin not to go to Caves Monastery while in Kiev. The visit of this huge religious complex is one of the highlights in whole Ukraine. Expect to spend here at least 1/2 a day.
    It was established in 11th century by greek monk St. Antoiny. With his followers he dug the whole underground system of caves and tunnels, which became their new home and palce of studying and worshipping.
    Later, monastery spread also above ground, reaching the size of 28 hectars. It became the intelectual center of Kievan Russia. In several raids and fires the monastery was destroyed, but always rebuilt and it's still in use today.
    The complex is devided in two parts - upper and lower. In lower you can visit the caves where still the mummies of the monks lie. Watch your head, if you are among the taller ones :-).

    The entrance fee is 10 grivnas (students half price). It's recomended to drees properly - no shorts and sleeveless shirts.

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    Kiev Pechersk Lavra

    by arantha Updated Sep 30, 2006

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    Kiev Pechersk Lavra, Kiev, 2006

    Kiev Pechersk Lavra, founded in the 11th century by the Greec Orthodox monk st. Antony, is one of the greatest worship centres in Eastern Europe, thanks to which Kiev is sometimes called the "Russian Jerusalem". It's an anormous size complex of over 80 buildings, located on 30ha area. However, not the buildings are the most important, but caves, which are the proper monastery.
    There are two cave complexes: The Close Caves and the Far Caves (which are open just for worshipers). At the entrance to the caves you will buy a typical Orthodox thin candle (from 0,5hr), which will be your only light while walking down the caves. Inside you will see some old sarcophaguses and Orthodox saints' effigies. The special atmosphere creates also the fact, that it's still a worship centre (not only a tourist attraction), so you will see all those believers, focused and devoted to pray; kissing the icons and falling down on their knees.

    Therefore you must behave with a strict dignity. You are not allowed to speak(!) and wear shorts (or short skirts); your arms and hair (according to the women) cannot be visible. And just don't behave too touristy.

    The Close Caves have been digged in the 11th century and are located from 5 to 20m down. The lenght of the corridors (which are 2m high and 1m wide) is 228m. I don't recommand a visit if you are claustrophobic! However, the whole monastery complex is worht a visit because the churches are beautiful themself.
    It's seriously amazing and unique!

    Opening hours: 9.00-18.00
    The last admission to the caves: 16.00
    Admission:
    normal ticket - 20hr
    students/children/seniors - 5hr
    map of the whole complex (also in English) - 5hr

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    the caves monastry (kyiv-pechersk lavra)

    by ketch1973 Written Nov 6, 2006

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    this is a place that everyone who visits kiev should go to. set in over 25 hectares of land above the river dnipro it has been standing here since the 11th century. the area has lots of different churches which you can visit. some were detroyed during the war and by the soviet occupation although thos that were destroyed have been re built.
    i would most definately advise getting a tour guide to take you round as i was there on my own on a sunday (by far the busiest day) and missed so much but i went back with a friend during the week and we got a guide which was much better. cost about 200 hry which included entry.
    by far the highlight is going underground into the caves where you walk by candlight and you can see some bodies of ancient monks in glass topped coffins. the bodies are wrapped up however but you can see some of their hans and feet.

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    Visit the Pechersk Lavra

    by Greatwalk0 Written Aug 3, 2007

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    The 12th Century Gates of Pechersk Lavra
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    The Pechersk Lavra in Kiev is an amazing Christian Orthodox Monastery located slightly outside of Kiev. One of four UNESCO National Heritage sites in Ukraine, Pechersk Lavra is a MUST VISIT if in Kiev.

    The lavra complex is made up of numerous buildings and churches. Perhaps the most interesting (they are ALL interesting) of them are the "caves monastery" where nearly 100 Orthodox monks are buried. Visitors descend into the caves with lit candles (no lights) and wonder around the narrow corridors that house the bodies of these holy figures. Devotees will stop and kiss the caskets of select monks and say a prayer. Others simply pass through in silence. The whole scene is all very surreal! I strongly reccomend a visit!

    Admission fees are nominal.

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    PECHERSK LAVRA: All-Saints Church

    by hydronetta Updated Aug 22, 2006

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    This church with its five gold-plated domes was built above “Economic” gate which led to the Economy Building of Pechersk Lavra. The interior with the impressive frescoes (see additional photos) was painted in 1906. Of particular interest was the arched densely painted entrance to the church with themes from city scenes (see additional photo)

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    Kyyevo-Pecherska lavra-2

    by Listig Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The ensemble is organically linked to the relief and forms a beautiful and majestic silhouette of Kyiv from the Dnipro River side. In 1926 the Kyivan Cave Historical-Cultural Preserve was established on the premises of the monastery.

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    Pecherska Lavra.

    by Askla Updated Dec 13, 2012

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    Uspenski Cathedral.
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    According to the Nestor Chronicle the starting off for the Pecherska Lavra, as we call the place today, was in 1051. That year St Anthony, a Greek, started digging the caves which later grew to a vaste complex of different caves where the monks lived their lives and were buried after their deaths. The climate in the caves has always been so dry and cool that the bodies were mumified by nature. They can still be seen.
    The monastery developed rapidly. In the 12th century Lavra became a leading religious, spiritual, educational, and cultural center of Eastern Europe. It had icon-painting studios, a superb library, its own print shop, and a scriptorium where works of ancient and contemporary foreign writers were translated into Slavic.

    The word lavra means a very large monastery, while pechery means cave.
    There are now some 23 churches and shrines inside the walls of the complex. Most of them were built in the 17th and 18th centuries, however there is one church still standing which was built in the 12th century, the Troitska Overgate Church. The striking Bell Tower was built in 1731-45.
    The most well known building on the precinct is the Uspensky Cathedral, see my next tip on that.
    There are also a couple of museums worth seeing. I have tips on two of them as well.

    Working hours everyday from 09.00 to 18.00.
    Admission fee: 50 Hryvnia. Photos 100 Hryvnia extra (if my memory serves me right).
    For the museums extra admission fees will apply.

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    The Uspensky Cathedral.

    by Askla Updated Dec 13, 2012

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    The building of the Uspensky church started in 1075 if we follow the Nestor Chronicle. The land and 100 Hryvnia in gold were given by prince of Kiev. The consecration took place in 1089. Sadly it was destroyed in 1941, but was reconstructed and ready for reconsecration in 2000. More then 8.500 kg of leaf gold had been used for the gilding works.

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    The Book and Printing Museum.

    by Askla Written Oct 29, 2012

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    The Book and Printing Museum is situated in one of the buildings in the back part of the Pecherska Lavra complex. It shows books and printings from the very old books of Kievan Rus till large religious books from the 18th - 19th centuries.
    Admission fee 15 Hryvnia.

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