Lviv Favorites

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  • hunterV's Profile Photo

    Post Office

    by hunterV Updated Jul 5, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: My friend Diana from Amsterdam asked me to help her at the post-office.
    So we went there and inquired about their services.
    The central post-office occupies an old huge building at 1 Slovatsky Street.
    Tel.+380 322 721080
    The area code for Lviv is 79000.
    The post-office has a detailed web site, but unfortunately only in Ukrainian.

    Central Post-Office, Lviv The emblem of Lviv National Museum Shevchenko monument at Folk Architecture Museum Driving downtown, Lviv Paying homage to the fallen heroes
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals
    • Photography

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  • om_212's Profile Photo

    Lviv Web Resources in English

    by om_212 Written Aug 2, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The 2012 Football Championship has stimulated creation of two very good websites on Lviv – Lviv. Travel and Visit.Lviv that besides good graphics and useful information in Ukrainian have comprehensive and adequate English translations. Besides things to do, the places to stay (including hostels), places to eat, it has the list of upcoming events, which I find particularly useful.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Currency and prices

    by toonsarah Written Jun 24, 2010

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    Favorite thing: The Ukrainian currency is the Hryvnia. There are bills for 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 Hryvnias. There are also coins (kopiyka) – 100 kopiyka make one Hryvnia. The Hryvnia (usually abbreviated to UAH) is a relatively new currency, having been introduced in September 2 1996 when independence brought separation from the rouble zone.

    The Hryvnia is a so-called “soft” currency, meaning that you can’t buy it outside the country. But once you get Lviv you shouldn’t have any problems, although when we arrived late at night at the station we couldn’t get the ATMs to accept our cards and were glad to find an exchange desk open. The next morning however I went to the bank near the George Hotel and was able to withdraw money from the ATM, which was helpfully situated in a closed cubicle off the street, to give privacy, and had instructions in English and other languages too.

    When we were in Lviv there were roughly ten Hryvnia to the Euro, making “in your head” conversions pretty easy. Prices for almost everything were much lower than we are used to in the West, leading to many exclamations regarding the cheapness of meals, beer, entrance fees, tram fares etc. You can get a good two course meal for around 5€ (including a beer to wash it down), a generous shot of vodka for 1€, and travel on the tram for about 10 cents. But remember if you spend any time with local people that their much lower wages mean that these aren’t bargain prices to them.

    Ukrainian banknotes

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    Cyrillic alphabet

    by toonsarah Written Jun 24, 2010

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    Favorite thing: The Ukrainian language uses the Cyrillic alphabet, making translation and understanding doubly difficult for those of us unused to it. Even place names and street signs are a challenge! It’s worth making the effort to learn the letters for this reason, even if you don’t have the time to master much of the actual language. I was pleased to find that the Russian I learnt many years ago at school (and have since almost totally forgotten) stood me in good stead, as I was able to pick out most of the letters and work out many of the signs.

    One thing to bear in mind is that even letters that look the same as ours aren’t necessarily the same. What looks like an H is an N; what looks like a P is an R; a B is a V; and so on. So “PECTOPAH” on the building in my main photo should be said “RESTORAN” – and its meaning is immediately clear! The label on the beer glass in the other photo denotes that it is from Lviv, and beneath that on the red background is smaller lettering “VKPAIHA” – “UKRAINA”.

    Learn these letters and finding your way around becomes just a little easier. But if you can’t get the hang of them, do carry a card with the name of your hotel in Ukrainian – that way you will always be able to ask the way back if really stuck.

    Sign in Cyrillic Beer!

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    LYCHAKIV CEMETERY - LWOW EAGLETS

    by LoriPori Written Jun 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Communal graves of soldiers and Freedom Fighters can also be found at Lychakiv Cemetery. The most renowned is the Graves of the LWOW EAGLETS. The Eaglets were Polish child soldiers who defended Lviv during the Polish-Ukrainian War (1918 - 1919).

    There is also the Military Section of the Cemetery dedicated to the "Defenders of Lwow".

    Graves of Lwow Eaglets Military Section

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    LYCHAKIV CEMETERY

    by LoriPori Updated Jun 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of Lviv's most distinctive, beautiful and historic sites, is the LYCHAKIV CEMETERY, located 4 km east of the city center on Meczynkowa Vul. This is an ideal location to begin your exploration of Lviv's diverse history, fascinating culture and stunning art. So that is exactly what our VT Group did on Wednesday, June 2. Victor (HunterV) was our "Official Guide". We enjoyed our tour very much as Victor explained many things to us, as most writings were in Ukrainian.
    Although officially established in 1786 by Austro-Hungarian authorities, the first burials actually took place in the 16th century. Since then more than 400,000 Inhabitants have been laid to rest here. Grave markers have tributes inscribed in Ukrainian, Russian, German, Polish, Armenian and Latin - evidence of Lviv's diversity.
    Throughout the 19th century, plots were reserved by elite and middle class families, artisans, scientists, spiritual leaders and politicians. This trend obviously shifted during the Soviet era, as, wedged between ancient chapels and elite family crypts, stand simple monuments. When we visited, a new grave still covered with flowers (photo #5), could be seen. It was being worked on by an engraver, putting in the details of the newly departed.

    Admission to the cemetery was 10 UAH ( about $1.50 CDN)

    Fondest memory: Lychakiv is a protected historical monument. Here you will see many beautiful sculptures such as the statue of an angel gazing sadly towards heaven.
    The Tomb of Volodymyr Ivasyuk (photo # 2) portrays a young man, who died at a young age. Victor explained to us that his tomb says this young man died of tragic circumstances.
    Tomb of Solomiya Krushelnytska (photo #3).
    The elaborate and beautiful Tomb of Armenian Archbishop Samuel Cyryl Stefanowicz (photo # 4)

    Chapel at entrance of Cemetery Tomb of Volodymyr Ivasyuk Tomb of Solomiya Krushelnytska Tomb of Archbishop Stefanowicz New Grave being engraved

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    TARAS SHEVCHENKO 1814 - 1861

    by LoriPori Written Jun 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Taras Shevchenko (1841 - 1861) was a Ukrainian Poet, artist and humanist. He also made many masterpieces as a painter and an illustrator.His works and life are revered by Ukrainians and his impact on Ukrainian literature is immense. Taras Shevchenko is pictured on the current 100 hryvnia banknote. There is a monument to him and the sculpture "Wave of National Revival" located on Svobody Prospekt. It's a local favourite meeting place.

    Taras Shevchenko Monument

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    LORIPORI'S LVIV TIDBITS

    by LoriPori Updated Jun 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Here is a few of LORIPORI'S TIDBITS - helpful bits of information about your visit to Lviv.

    VISAS:
    Citizens of the EU, Norway, Switzerland, Japan, Israel, Canada and the U.S. can enter Ukraine visa-free and stay up to 90 days.

    ELECTRICITY:
    220 volts Ac, 50 Hz - all sockets require two round pins

    CURRENCY:
    The national currency is the Hryvnia (hr or UAH)
    Notes: 1 2 5 10 50 100 200 500 Hryvnia
    Coins: 100 kopecks in a hryvnia - 1 2 5 10 25 50 kopecks 1 hr

    EXCHANGE BOOTHS:
    I saw a few exchange booths during our walks around Lviv. Personally, I used an ATM machine across the street from the George Hotel. It had English as a language option which was helpful.
    When I got home and checked my bank statement, the 200 hr cost me $27.17 CDN or 13.5 cents each hryvnia / 7.4 hr per $1.00 CDN

    LVIV IN YOUR POCKET:
    A great little reference book to have. I got mine (free) at the George Hotel. It contains hotels, restaurants, cafe's, nightlife, sightseeing, events, shopping and maps - all in great detail.

    Svobody Prospekt Lviv in your Pocket Ukraine currency - Notes

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    THE LATIN CATHEDRAL

    by LoriPori Written Jun 18, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Archcathedral Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary or simply THE LATIN CATHEDRAL is located in Old Town, in the southwestern corner of Market Square - Ploshcha Rynok- at Ploshcha Katedralna 1.
    The first church built on this site was a small wooden Roman Catholic Church, built in 1344 but lost in a fire six years later. In 1360, King Casimir III of Poland founded the present day church, built in Gothic style.
    In the years 1761 - 1776 the cathedral was refurbished in Baroque style and a tall bell tower was added.

    The Latin Cathedral

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    MARKET SQUARE - PLOSCHA RYNOK

    by LoriPori Updated Jun 17, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: With its stunning palaces, fountains, statues, cafe's and crowds of people, RYNOK SQUARE is the Heart of Lviv. Amazingly, within this relatively small area, there are 45 protected architectural monuments. Each structure has its own captivating history, but the oldest and most revered are Chorna Kamianytsa ( Black Stone House ) and Kornjakt Palace or King Jan III Sobieski Palace.
    The imposing structure in the middle is City Hall.
    Rynok Square is to the east of Prospect Svobody

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    A BIT ABOUT LVIV

    by LoriPori Written Jun 17, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A city in Western Ukraine, LVIV is regarded as one of the main cultural centers of Ukraine. The historic center, with its old buildings, survived the Second World War and Soviet presence, largely unscathed. Lviv is home to many world-class cultural institutions, including the famous Lviv Theatre of Opera and Ballet. The Historic City center is on the UNESCO World Heritage List.
    Lviv is located approximately 70 km from the Polish border, one of the reasons our VT Group made a side trip here. Thanks Matt (Matcrazy1) and Urszula for making this trip possible.
    Also,I want to thank Victor (HunterV) for coming many hundreds of miles and many hours by train just to visit with our VT Group in Lviv. In my opinion, it was the absolute highlight of our Lviv experience. You are such a kind and gentle man, who helped us all in so many ways.

    VT Group at the Cemetery Lviv Theatre of Opera

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Read up on current information

    by Dabs Written Jun 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Much has changed traveling to this part of the world in the last 20 years since our 1st trip to Ukraine, it's no longer necessary to change money on the black market, bring your own supply of food or leave tips for the maids with lipstick, nylons or American cigarettes. No one is interested in buying your blue jeans or tennis shoes. I'd even argue that the quality of the toilet paper, at least at our hotel and the couple of restaurants where I used the WC, is good enough that you don't need to lug that with you anymore. I even drank water out of the tap at our hotel and have lived to tell the tale.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Market Square

    by HORSCHECK Updated Jul 6, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The history of Lviv's Market Square (Ploshcha Rynok) dates back to the 14th century.

    The town hall stands in the middle of the square and it is surrounded by about 44 burgher houses of various architectural styles, each of them has its own story.

    Please read my "Things to do" tips for more information about some of the buildings.

    The Market Square was always the centre of the town, therefore it has seen many historic events from arrivals of dukes and kings to executions of thieves and adulterers.

    Four fountains with statues of Greek gods were erected in the corners of the square in the late 18th century.

    Nowadays the Market Square is pedestrianised; only old trams rattle down the southern side.

    North side of the Market Square Fountain on the Market Square Market Square seen from the Town Hall tower Painter at the Market Square Market Square seen from the Town Hall tower
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Trains

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  • 68maciek's Profile Photo

    Romania-Ukraine-Poland-Slovakia-Hungary-Romania tr

    by 68maciek Written Apr 3, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I have been to Ukraine few times but not by car because it was more convenient in my case.Just two examples few times by feet I never waited both ways due to my luck, by train into Ukraine no waiting time on normal gauge way Sanok- Hiriv (Chyrow), but way back four hours late (the train timetable means nothing)due to carefull Polish (EU) custom control.
    However I know or read about many Poles who drive to Crimea (and the road is better than some main ones in Poland).Few goes to Romania or Bulgaria through Ukraine as well (but more choose standard way thorugh Hungary). If Poles go to Ukrainian Karpaty it's more convenient to go without car.
    Main roads are similar as in Romania here and toward Lviv .
    I've heard that Ukrainian-Romania border was slower than Poland-Ukraine few years ago,but not sure about it.
    The latest news I have found on www.gazeta.pl->forum-> turystyka-> Ukraina
    21.03 Ukrainian side: 7 min. Polish one: 1.40 hour (due to slow Polish custom officers)
    Another post from February:
    17.02.(Slovakia-Ukraine -Uzhorod) przejście słowacko-ukraińskie w pobliżu Użhorodu - 15 min.(!!!!)
    23.02.(Ukraine-Poland_ Szeginie-Medyka - 1 godz. 40 min. Nieuprzejmi celnicy
    ukraińscy (unpolite Ukrainian custom officers).

    There is another check point close by: Korczowa-Krakowiec

    If above is right it is ok to go by car and visit some places on your way (if you not prefer Japanese-American style of travelling) to Krakow like Przemysl,Lancut, Jaroslaw,Tarnow,Debno,Bochnia and surrondings, Niepolomice,Wieliczka.
    You can close a fantastic loop later towards Romania (at least two equally interesting ways trough Slovakia) and visit Tatry,Kezmarok, Slovenski Raj (means paradise is also karstic area as Padis, but still a bit different) Slovensky Kras caves or after Stary Sacz Stara L'ubovna,Presov,Kosice,and places in Hungary (Aggtelek,Miskolc,Tokaj, Debrecen are waiting) on your way home.

    If you visit these places which are on your direct way you will still miss many others close by to this road.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

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  • om_212's Profile Photo

    Lviv travel guide in 5 languages

    by om_212 Updated Jul 2, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Touring Lviv (Publisher: Baltia) - a detailed 224-page guidebook on the sight-seeing places, with maps. Includes a lot of useful information, including Lviv restaurants, coffee shops, place to go out and accommodation tips. it also has a section on trips outside of Lviv (Zhovkva-Krekhiv, Olesko-Pidhitsi-Zolochiv, etc.) Besides Ukrainian and Russian, it’s available in English, German and Polish. it's available in all book stores on Rynok Sq. and around. the price varies from 55-65 Hr ($11-13). there are also plentry of smaller brochures and leaflets on the single places like the Latin Cathedral, the Golden Horse-Shoe trip, etc.

    you might also consider stocking travel guides to other Ukrainian cities including Kyiv (English, German, Italian Spanish, Polish, Russian); Crimea (English, German, Russian); Transcarpatia (English, Russian); Odesa (English, Russian)

    finally travel guides written in Ukraine
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

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