Fun things to do in Ukraine

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Ukraine

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    Kolommya / Kolomiya

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    Kolomiya/ Kolomyya is a town at the centre of Hustul culture located within the Ivano-Frankivsk province of Western Ukraine. Kolomiya as well as being a town is also the administrative division of the Kolomiya district and is a popular town to get shopping for most means. This is where most people will come from small villages around the town to buy electrical appliances as they are pretty hard to get elsewhere.

    As like most of Western Ukraine the town of Kolomiya has been ruled by other European powerhouses such as Poland, Moldova, Russia and Austria and it is evident as you walk around Kolomiya because you can see the influences in the buildings and architecture.

    Kolomiya is known in Ukraine as being the town of hot people so if you tell someone your girlfriend/boyfriend is from Kolomiya they will be very impressed.

    Kolomiya is a small town so it is a great place to spend a day if you are nearby.

    Some of the must see places in Kolomiya is the museum of painted eggs (Pysanka Museum), the town hall and the markets. There are many small cafes and coffee shops in the town.

    Please see my Kolomiya page for more tips :)

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    L'viv's Wonder Train

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    The Chudo Poyidz translated as the Wonder Train is a sightseeing train that travels around central L'viv. I decided to try out the Wonder Train after it started raining and wanted to see the main sights of the city whilst staying dry.

    The train leaves roughly every 30 minutes from Rynok Square in L'viv and lasts for 1 hour. Some of the sights on the route include King Danylo Monument, L'viv University, L'viv Opera Theatre, St Mykolay Church, St Onufriy Church and Monastry, Ivan Franko Monument and Old Market Square to name but a few!

    The Train is very fairly priced at 50 UAH, the commentary inside the train is in Ukrainian. You can purchase headphones before the train sets off where you can select the commentary in English, German, Russian and French. The only problem I found with this is that the commentary inside the train was quite loud and I could still hear it despite having my headphones on which was a bit distracting. This isn't the type of train where you can get out at each sight, you can not disembark until the train has finished the tour.

    I actually really enjoyed the tour and I would recommend it as a fast way to see what is in the city and then if you want a closer look or to learn more you can find it on your map and take a walk down.

    The website indicates that they operate all year round on a daily basis and the train will only run during day light hours.

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    L'viv Opera House

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    The Solomiya Krushelnytska Lviv State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre is located on Svobody Avenue in central L'viv. The theatre was built in the late 1800s. Details of shows can be found on the website listed below. Unfortunately I was not in L'viv long enough to catch a show but the building is absolutely stunning and is definitely worth a see.

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    St Michael's Monastry

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    St Michael's golden domed monastry is one of the most famous churches in Kyiv and absolutely stunning!. It is located on the right bank of the Dniper River and isn't far from Independence Square and St Sophia's Cathedral. The monastry was originally built in 1713 but was destroyed by the soviets many years later. Following Ukraine's Independence in 1991 the monastry was rebuilt in 1999 and has since become one of the most famous landmarks in Kyiv.

    There are some lovely gardens around the back of the Cathedral where you can have a stroll around or sit and absorb the atmosphere.

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    Motherland Statue

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    The Motherland statue stands tall and can be seen in most places in Kyiv. Built in 1981 the stainless steel statue is roughly 203 ft tall. At the time of the statue being finished it was the tallest statue in the world and is even smaller than the Statue of Liberty in New York. Beside the statue is the Museum of the Great Patriotic War.

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    Chernobyl Museum

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

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    The Chernobyl Museum is located in the Podil district of Kyiv and can be reached by Metro. The museum is medium in size and houses some genuine artifacts taken from the area around the explosion and shows the technical progression of the incident as well as video tapes of people who have survived the disaster.

    The museum is fairly priced at around 10 hrynias per person, if you want to take photographs inside the museum you have to pay about another 10 hryvnias per camera. Unfortuantely most of the information sheets around the museums are in Ukrainian but you can buy audio guided tours from the reception desk and if I remember correctly these cost 40 Hryvnias each.

    The museum is very hard to find as there are no signs. See the General Area or Directions tab for details.

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    Kreschatyk

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    Kreschatyk is the main street that runs through most of central Kyiv. During weekends and bank holidays the street is shut to cars and buses and the streets fill with buskers, entertainers and people just hanging out enjoying the ambience. Kreschatyk is lined with cafe's and shops and also leads to some of the great market places in central Kyiv in one direction and to the fabulous Independence Square and Dynamo Kyiv stadium in the other direction. During bank holidays you may also find concerts being held along Kreschatyk, these concerts usually start at midday and carry on through the evening until about 10-11 o'clock. There are many refreshment stalls along Kreschatyk selling hot dogs, ice creams, cigarettes etc.

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    Dubno Fortress and Castle

    by Pomocub Written Feb 16, 2014

    Dubno is a city located on the Ilkva River in Rivne Province in Western Ukraine. Although it is classed as a city Dubno is more like a town. The most interesting places to visit in Dubno are the fortress and the castle.

    The Castle was founded by Konstantin Ostrogski who was a Lithuanian Prince buried in the Kiev Pechersk Lavra (Cave Monasteries)

    Over the years Dubno Castle was involved in heavy fighting including the Khlemelnysky Uprsing which was a Cossack rebellion under the command of Ukrainian hero Bohdan Khlemenlnsky.

    The Castle was turned into a prison for some years where over 500 prisoners were detained. Now the Castle and the Fortress are fairly well maintained and is the main focal point in the town of Dubno.

    If you travel to Dubno Castle by car you are able to park up right in front of the castle.

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    Pysanky Museum

    by Pomocub Written Feb 15, 2014

    The Pysanka museum is the museum of painted eggs and is located in the centre of Kolomiya and is the only museum of its kind. The museum is the most famous landmark in the town and is instantly recognised by many Ukrainians. The museum houses a collections of over 10,000 painted eggs from all the regions in Ukraine and even has a sample of eggs that were painted in other European countries.

    The museum does have a website but unfortunately it is only in Ukrainian.

    Opening hours:
    Tuesday-Sunday: 10:00-18:00
    Monday - shut

    Ticket prices are 10UAH per paying adult. You have to pay extra if you would like to take photographs.

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    Eat Ukrainian...

    by arturowan Updated Feb 5, 2014

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    When visiting Ukraine, it's possible to find tour agencies which offer a guided introduction to the country's cuisine...
    For a set fee, you will be guided around about 3 restaurants, in whatever city you're staying, to take in leisurely servings of breakfast/brunch/lunch...
    If you're a newcomer to Ukraine, than this is a great way to discover the place & some of its national dishes, with somebody who knows the language...
    I've never taken part in such tours myself, but I do know what a recommendable country for eating, Ukraine is - ironic perhaps, considering the periods of starvation throughout the country's history, but nonetheless, the republic remains regarded as 'the bread bowl of Russia'...
    Ukraine may be seeking an identity apart from Russia, but its cuisine is a mix of Russian influenced dishes, & other Slavic influences, & both these traditions are based around bread...
    Ukraine has long been regarded as 'the bread bowl of Russia', & if you've ever crossed the country during late summer, you'll know why this is so...
    Bread is available in many forms, included sliced white in a bag, but traditional 'khlep' comes as a loaf, & as well as the dark brown wholemeal & rye types, is often decorated with sunflower , sesame, or poppy seeds, with special variations for different festivals...
    As well as the whole loaves, sold in supermarkets, kiosks, & bakeries, there are many variations of dough recipes, some of which are filled with sweet or savoury fillings, like an alternative form of pasty...
    Bread is the main basis for breakfast, with jam or honey, or just pork fat...
    If you visit a supermarket in Ukraine, you'll find that cereal is rarely available, apart from kasha, the traditional porridge, which is usually served sugared, or with syrup...
    Pancakes are also a breakfast dish, also served with syrup, or sour cream, known as 'smetana', which is something of a national dish, in itself, so often is it served with both hot & cold dishes...
    Though the bread-based cuisine is alike that of Mediterranean countries, unfortunately for Ukrainian health statistics, it is often served with heavily saturated, dairy & meat accompaniments, such as pork fat 'salo', ( which is known colloquially as 'Ukrainian heroin'...)
    If you eat in a restaurant, your meal will probably be accompanied by a sideplate of little greasy balls, amongst which will be salo, for your delectation, (or not, unless you're a fan of bread & dripping...)
    This taste for pure fat & dairy produce, means that not only do Ukrainians live less healthily than other parts of Europe, but there is a high incidence of heart disease, & the national figure does often involve a bulbous paunch...
    0ld men are only noticable by their absence on Ukrainian streets, simply because men are still only expected to live to 60 - while women do not fare much better, at 71
    However, the Ukrainian attitude towards food, is that it's there to be enjoyed, & better a shorter life than to deny your tastebuds!
    I share this philosophy, but not the craving for fatty/dairy foods...
    A favourite discovery of mine while in Ukraine, were 'vareniky' - a variation on ravioli, but made without the sauce, which is served as a separate accompaniment with savoury dishes...
    However, 'vareniky' is made in sweet & savoury variations, the dessert version containing fruit, usually blackcurrants or cherries, but if it is homemade, it might be whatever is in season, & are served with sour cream & sugar...
    All sorts of meats might be included inside the cases of main course 'vareniky', & this might cause the name to differ, such as 'khinkali' - meatballs in a pastry parcel...
    These are my favourite, & are very filling by themselves, though they are usually put on the table with potatoes, mushrooms, cabbage, or all 3
    I admit (!) I bought my 'vareniky' ready-made from the supermarket chiller section, but they were delicious & easily cooked in several minutes, & I could happily survive on this dish with months!
    Ukrainian food is often attractively served, such as stews in traditional ceramic pots - on 1 occasion at a restaurant I was served a soup, inside a hoollowed-out loaf of bread!
    A favourite dish in Ukraine, shared with the Polish, is 'galooptsy' - cabbage leaves stuffed with spiced meat, usually pork...
    Pig meat is the favourite with Ukrainians, especially in the form of sausage, to such extent I've listed it separately on here, titled 'kolbasa'...
    The dish most obviously associated with Ukraine, because of its name - Chicken Kiev (kotlety po-Kyivskomy), is not really considered any more of a national food, than any other...
    Soup is another staple dish in Russo-Ukrainian culture, & on my first visit, it was insisted I taste the national dish - 'borshch'...
    I was not to enthusiastic about this, because 'borshch' is said to be 'beetroot soup', & I fail to understand why folk wish to eat a vegetable that tastes only of what it's grown in...
    However, pure beetroot soup is 'svyokaleeg', whereas 'borshch' is beetroot based, but with cabbage, tomato, carrot, onion, pepper, & many other ingredients - recipes vary depending on the cook, & it really is very tasty...
    As well as hot soup, cold soup is also a favourite, especially in hot weather, & a variation on 'borshch' is 'zilyony borshch', meaning green, with the addition of sorrel, sour cream, & hard-boiled egg...
    Another soup traditionally served with sour cream, is 'salyanka', which is a broth of stewed cucmbers, & a favourite summer dish...
    Cucumbers are the staple of the kitchen garden, to such an extent, that the word for kitchen gardener, as well as colloquialism for a crop-duster plane - 'agoorooznik', is derived from the word for cucmber - 'agoorets'...
    Another derivation of the word cucumber, is - 'agoorcheek', meaning gherkin, & many immature cucmbers are pickled by the kitchen gardener, as a source of food for the winter...
    Home-pickling is a popular pursuit in Ukraine, & very little that grows from the ground, does not receive the pickling treatment, which requires an acquired taste, when applied to such things as tomatoes...
    Another preserving treatment for the fruits of forest or kitchen garden, is to make 'kompote' - a bottled puree that can be diluted when required, & is usually served in a pitcher, with dried fruit at the bottom...
    Salad is popular in Ukraine, & many contain olives as a staple ingredient, as well as tomatoes, peppers, mushrooms, & feta cheese...
    Despite the easy availability of salads in Ukrainian restaurants, vegetarianism is rarely catered to specifically, or properly understood, so non-meat eating visitors will not get further than the salad, though these tend to be served so generously, this is really not a problem, unless you're starving...
    Some visitors to the country survive on McDonalds, of which there are many outlets, but to live like this is truly a crime when such a wealth of tastes & ingredients is available on an almost 24/7 rota...
    Ukraine is not a country to visit if you're a food-faddist - its cuisine is so extensive, my guide only touches at the multiple dishes available, celebrating all the best of its own culture, as well as its Slavic & Russian neighbours...

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    Sheshory

    by Pomocub Written Jun 3, 2013

    Sheshory is a village in the Kosiv District of Ivano-Frankivsk (Western Ukraine). It is a wonderful place to relax and there are many excursions available from most of the hotels to the Carpathian Mountains. The Ukrainian's consider Sheshory to be a spa village and is surrounded by beautiful hills, wonderful landscape and of course the Pystynka River which runs straight through the village.

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    Spring and Easter in Kiev - The city blooms

    by Freddiexpat Written May 15, 2013

    AN EASTER BREAK IN KIEV.
    With the arrival of spring, the city blooms and comes alive with the warm days and pleasant evenings to enjoy promenading along Khreschatyk on or to go to the Botanic Gardens and enjoy the tulip gardens for an afternoon or to the Hydropark which is the city beach on the Dnieper river and relax. This is also the time of celebration of Easter where the pageantry of the churches are in parade and the people celebrate their faith in a colourful way. Then there are the celebrations and memorial for the end of World War 2(Gt Patriotic War) which again is a colourful event of this time of year to enjoy.
    There are so many thing to do in this friendly "green" city with it swathe of parks around it that makes it one of the most enjoyable to be in. From taking in the Opera or ballet. Then to the wealth of pubs and eateries from top global names down to the global brand chains entering the market there. The sports facilities have come a long way and the benefits of having Euro2012 there has paid off with better transport facilities and signage even in English . The best thing is that there is just so much to enjoy in the city at this time of year that makes it so great for an Easter break in the warmth where most of western Europe is still suffering from the last throws of winter.

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    Jurassic World Aquapark

    by Freddiexpat Written Feb 28, 2013

    The most awesome experience I have had in an indoor aquapark and spa.Kiev built Europe's largest indoor aquapark and this opened nearly 2 years ago. It is fantastic with a 35metre slide and many others in varying degrees of adrenalin inducement. To also have a fantastic spa facilities here makes it just great to get you back in shape for the rigors of western life. It is part of what is making this city stand out on the map. Then to go to the Opera for a third of the price of London in the restored opera house or go for a fabulous meal for half the price of London. To be able to go and finish the night out with some top class clubbing or just chilling out. Then to go on the adventure trail with a tank or paint balling is just some of the activities but the best is to be able to walk down the Arts and crafts on Andriivs'kyi descent on a lazy Sunday afternoon from the golden domes of St Michaels .

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    Kyiv/ Kiev

    by Pomocub Updated Nov 24, 2012

    Kyiv is the capital city of Ukraine located in the central region of the country. Kyiv more commonly known as Kiev is a buzzing modern city with ancient churches, castles and palaces on it's door step. Kyiv is the perfect place to spend a couple of days at the end of your travels in Ukraine before departing.

    If you are football fans Kyiv has two stadiums. The first is the Olympic Stadium which is the official ground of the Ukraine national football team and the second is the Lobonovsky Stadium which is home to Dynamo Kyiv.

    You can get to Kyiv from any major Ukrainian city via train, bus or car.

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    Things to do in Ukraine

    by mooshdiva Written Aug 21, 2012

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    Kiev and Odessa are both awesome. I would recommend both. Odessa is a bit better in the summer, because it's warmer, but you'll still have fun. I don't have too many recommendations on clubs, but sounds like you got that covered. Check out Andrevskiy Spusk in Kiev and the Lavra. Cool stuff. Odessa also has a really beautiful opera house. In fact, I have a post on my blog http://travelwithashley.com/ if you want more info.

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Ukraine Things to Do

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