Ballintoy Things to Do

  • Carrick-A-Rede
    Carrick-A-Rede
    by RavensWing
  • Larrybane
    Larrybane
    by RavensWing
  • The Rope Bridge
    The Rope Bridge
    by RavensWing

Most Recent Things to Do in Ballintoy

  • RavensWing's Profile Photo

    ~ White Park Bay ~

    by RavensWing Updated Oct 12, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    White Park Bay is located a couple of kilometers west of Ballingtoy. White Park Bay is a 3 mile long sandy beach.

    The spectacular sandy beach forms a white arc between two headlands on the North Antrim coast. In this secluded location, even on a busy day there is plenty of room for quiet relaxation. The beach is backed by ancient dunes that provide a range of rich habitats for bird and animal life.

    You can also find fossils on the beach. Fossils from the Jurassic period, Triassic period and Triassic period, This basalt forms the "Giant Causeway" further north.

    BEWARE
    Watch for the tides and slippery stones.

    White Park Bay White Park Bay White Park Bay Path down to the Beach Map of the Beach
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RavensWing's Profile Photo

    ~ Irelands Tiniest Church ~

    by RavensWing Written Oct 12, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My friend and I had been talking about a house that was for sale in Portbradden so we thought we'd take a trip down to Portbradden to check it out.

    What I found when I was at the bottom of the driveway was a sign saying 'Ireland's Tiniest Church'. I thought I might go in and see this tiny church. They didn't lie, St Gobban Church is the tiniest church. There's a small door to walk in. The entire church measures 10' x 4'. There is a small alter at the front, a high-back chair off to the side and they have plates on the ceiling.

    This tiny church is privately owned.

    To get here you drive down the A2 Whitepark Road, once you reach Portbradden Road you turn down it and go all the way to the end. It's a 7 mile drive from Ballintoy.

    St Gobban Church Altar One Side of the church Plaques on the Ceiling St Gobbins Church
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • RavensWing's Profile Photo

    ~ Swinging Bridge ~

    by RavensWing Updated Oct 8, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When I was in the military we had to walk across a long rope bridge. It was high above a cavern, two ropes for your hands so you can balance your rifle, and one rope at your feet for you to walk over. So when I found out there was a 'swinging bridge' I could cross when in Ireland I was excited.

    We headed to the admissions area, lucky for us there wasn't a long line up. We bought out tickets to cross the rope bridge - what we found out later was - if you aren't going to cross the bridge you don't need to purchase a ticket. We started the 1.2 km walk to the bridge. The path is steep and has many steps, if it's rained, watch for slippery rocks. There is a wheelchair access portion of the path for 450 yards. Once there, there is a telescope which is available for those who wish to take in the views.

    Once at the bridge, while we were waiting, we got talking to the worker there. She was saying that the only part she dislikes about her job is when people come to the bridge to conquer their fear of heights. It is pretty hard to convince a person who is frozen on the bridge not to look down and keep walking forward. Otherwise she loves her job.

    So it's my turn to walk across the bridge, the bridge is over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm. The view is beautiful - if you dare to look down. As you walk up the path to the top of the island, watch your step, the path is laden with rocks. I hope you've worn good shoes.

    At the top you are rewarded with the most stunning views of Rathlin Island and Scotland. Looking at Larrybane or Laragh Ban - the ancient white site and is the name of the limestone headland lying to the west of Larrybane Bay. An Iron Age Fort stood on the headland around AD800. There are also flat spots on the island where you can sit down and write, maybe have a picnic or simply take in the wildlife around the island.

    Well, I bet you can't guess how to get back to the car park -- only one way, across the bridge again. There is another path which you can take back that avoids all the stairs you had walked down. It gives you different views of the island.

    Go here for current Admission Prices and Opening Times

    For those of you that are Game of Throne Fans

    There were quite a few scenes that were filmed here, they are as follows:
    Featured Scenes:
    Season 2, Episode 3 – At Renly Baratheon’s camp, with Margaery Tyrell of House Tyrell. A tourney is taking place – where Brienne of Tarth bests Ser Loras and is given a place in Renly’s Kingsguard as her reward. Catelyn Stark comes to treat with Renly Baratheon (now also calling himself King), on behalf of her son, Robb Stark, King in the North. Renly Baratheon swears he will avenge Ned Stark’s death and bring Catelyn Joffrey’s head when he takes Kings Landing. Renly confirms he has the Reach and the Stormlands behind him.
    Episode 4 – Lord Baelish, Littlefinger, arrives at Renly Baratheon’s camp.
    Episode 5: Renly is dead. Stannis’ fleet is off shore and approaching fast.

    Carrick-A-Rede Larrybane Salmon Fishing Hut The Rope Bridge View of Rathlin Island and Scotland
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jmpncsu's Profile Photo

    Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

    by jmpncsu Written Aug 28, 2014

    Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is a famous rope bridge near Ballintoy on the northern coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland. The bridge itself is approximately 20 m long and stands about 30 m above the rocks below. The land is owned by the Natural Trust and there is a fee to cross - more than £5 per person. We visited as part of a tour with Irish Day Tours and it was included with the price of the tour. The cost is a little steep, but crossing the bridge and the views from Carrick-a-Rede island were very nice. There is no charge just to walk along the Causeway Coastal footpath, so you could walk right up to the bridge for free if you don't want to pay. Originally, the bridge was used by fishermen to catch salmon and was taken down each winter. Overfishing led to a steep drop in the salmon population and now is used solely as a tourist attraction. From the island and footpath, you can see Rathlin Island and Scotland in the distance. There are also great views of Larry Bane Head and Bay looking west towards the parking lot. There was once a quarry in these white cliffs. Looking south, you can see Portaneevey Cliffs, which have several sea caves in their base. Lots of beautiful views!

    Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge Sheep Island Larry Bane Bay Portaneevey Cliffs Carrick-a-Rede
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Between Ballintoy Harbour and Whitepark Bay

    by MalenaN Updated Apr 16, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is a lovely walk for just over 1km between Ballintoy Harbour and Whitepark Bay. Below the cliffs there are several limestone and basalt rocks. Some of the rocks you can climb for a nice view and a few are formed like arches. One of the arches is called Elephant Rock. Crossing the grassland I passed sheep and wild rabbits outside their home. And big waves were rolling in over the cliffs from the sea.

    I walked here on the afternoon when I arrived to Ballintoy, but also the next day when I returned by foot from Giant’s Causeway.

    View towards Ballintoy Harbour
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Sheep Island

    by MalenaN Written Apr 13, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The small rocky island off the coast in Ballintoy is named Sheep Island because sheep used to be taken there by boat to graze during the summer. The relatively flat top is grass covered but the surrounding cliffs are steep.

    Since 1969 the island has been owned by the National Trust and it is a Special Protection Area with a rich bird life. There is a colony of breeding cormorants and also puffins, razorbills, kittiwakes and many more species.

    Sheep Island Sheep Island Sheep Island
    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Ballintoy Harbour

    by MalenaN Written Apr 12, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From the main road a narrow road leads down, past the church, to Ballintoy Harbour. It is a picturesque place below the limestone cliffs. On the seaward side the harbour is protected by big basalt rocks. And in the distance you can see Rathlin Island and beyond that the Scottish coast.

    In the small stone house in the harbour you will find Roark’s Kitchen a restaurant/tearoom only open during high season. In May and September it is open only during weekends, but in June, July and August it is open every day between 11 - 19. Unfortunately it was not open when I visited.

    Above an old lime kiln there is a picnic area with tables and benches.

    Ballintoy Harbour

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Dunseverick Castle

    by MalenaN Updated Apr 11, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not much remains of Dunseverick Castle. The small ruins are from a castle built in the 16th century, which was destroyed by General Munro in 1642. A tower survived for many years, but it finally collapsed into the sea in 1972.

    Dunseverick was for long an important site. Already in 1525BC a fort was built here by one of the Kings of Ireland, Sobairce. In the 5th century Saint Patrick visited the castle several times and in 870 the castle was attacked by Vikings.

    The ruins are situated on a rock surrounded by the sea on three sides. Even if the ruins are not impressive the surroundings are beautiful and the history interesting. I passed the site when I walked along the Causeway Walk between Giant’s Causeway and Ballintoy, but at Dunseverick the main road is running very close to the sea so you can see the ruins even from the car or bus.

    Dunseverick Castle Dunseverick Castle Dunseverick Castle Dunseverick Castle Dunseverick Castle
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Whitepark Bay

    by MalenaN Written Apr 2, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A couple of kilometres west of Ballintoy is Whitepark Bay. Below the limestone cliffs is an arch shaped long golden beach. It is a Natural Trust beach. Lots of birds and other animals can be seen around it and several traces of Neolitic settlers have been found. It is not good for swimming though as there are rip currents and sand shelves. But it is a beautiful place to walk in. In the north western corner of the beach is the small village of Portbradden where you can see the smallest church on Ireland and above the cliffs there is a hostel. If you walk beyond the headland in the north eastern corner of the beach you will come to Ballintoy Harbour. If it is high tide this way will be blocked.

    Whitepark Bay Whitepark Bay Whitepark Bay Whitepark Bay Whitepark Bay
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Hiking along the Causeway Coast

    by MalenaN Updated Apr 2, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My first intention had been to walk from Ballintoy to Giant’s Causeway, but someone I talked to, who visits the area frequently, told me it is better to walk the opposite way as you then will have the best views in front of you and not in your back. I decided to do so and it also gave me time to first visit Dunluce Castle.

    After breakfast I took the bus from Ballintoy to Portballintrae. The bus ride took 20 minutes an and from Portballintrae it was another 20-25 minutes walk to Dunluce Castle. It was not difficult to find the way, I just walked west towards Portrush. There is no path along the coast so I followed the road.

    Leaving Dunluce Castle I walked the same way back to Portballintrae. In Portballintrae I continued to the long beach Bushfoot Strand and followed it to the end where there was a path over the sand dunes and on to Giant’s Causway Visitor Centre (which was not there as it was being rebuilt). The walk from Dunluce Castle to Causeway Hotel took 1 hour and 5-10 minutes and had been very pleasant.

    I had coffee and scones at the Causeway Hotel before visiting Giant’s Causeway. Many people advice you to take the cliff-top path to Giant’s Causeway, but as I was leaving that way I took the road leading downhill. After visiting I walked up the Shepard’s Steps to the cliff-top to see the views over Giant’s Causeway. Then I started my walk along the coast.

    Until Dunseverick castle the path is following the cliff-top and the scenery is wonderful. As there is no fence and drops can be steep you should not leave the path. I found a nice spot where there was some shelter from the wind where I ate my sandwich and fruit before continuing. At Dunseverick Castle you are close to the road so if you don’t want to continue walking you can take a bus from here, but remember they are not frequent.

    From Dunseverick Castle on to Whitepark Bay the path is going past several rocky coves and before Whitepark Bay you walk through a tunnel in the rock. The first part in the bay is rocky with boulders, but then you walk along the 2km long sandy beach. I was a bit worried before coming here that it would be high tide, because at high tide the way is blocked and you have to walk up to the road. But it was fine. From the end of the beach there is another kilometre to walk until you reach Ballintoy Harbour. From the harbour I walked up to Ballintoy village and the hostel, but if you are continuing to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge (which I had visited the previous day) you follow the road up to the church and then take the path left of the church.

    From the top of Giant’s Causeway back to the hostel it took four hours. I was lucky with the weather, even though it was a bit windy, and it had been a lovely walk.

    The walk between Giant’s Causeway and Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is 16.5km.

    You can find tide timetables here:
    www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/

    Somewhere east of Dunseverick
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Ballintoy Church

    by MalenaN Written Mar 29, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A church was founded on this site by the Stewart family who settled in the area in the 16th century. The church was rebuilt in the 17th century and the present church was completed in 1813. There used to be a tall spire, but it was destroyed in a hurricane 1894.

    I walked round the church and churchyard, but unfortunately the church was not open to the public when I visited.

    Ballintoy Church Ballintoy Church
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Afternoon walk along the coast

    by MalenaN Updated Mar 28, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge it is possible to walk along the coast for 16.5km to Giant’s Causeway. It is a very scenic walk. But this first afternoon in Ballintoy I only walked from Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge to Ballintoy Harbour, and a little further.

    From Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge to the car park it is about one km. Here I had coffee and scones at the Tea Room before walking on. The path starts in the end of the car park, on the cliff top above the old quarry at Larrybane. It continues inland for about a kilometre until you come to Ballintoy church. By the church you go right and follow the road down to the harbour for another kilometre.

    It was a lovely walk, the sun was shining and the views are beautiful. From the harbour I walked towards Whitepark Bay, but turned around before reaching the beach.

    From Ballintoy Harbour it took half an hour to walk back to the village and the hostel.

    Boheeshane Bay Path to Carrick-a-Rede Walking path Walking path Road to Ballintoy Harbour
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Larrybane

    by MalenaN Written Mar 26, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Next to the car park is Larrybane Head with white limestone cliffs. There was a quarry hear until the beginning of the 1970s. On the headland archaeologists have found traces of an Iron Age fort from around AD800.The Gaelic name Laragh Bán means Ancient white site.

    The Causeway Coastal Path begins here and you can walk along the coast for almost 20km to Giants Causeway.

    The old quarry at Larrybane Head
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

    by MalenaN Written Mar 26, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is a 20 metre long rope bridge, 30 metres above the sea, which spans from the mainland to the Carrick Island. The name Carrick-a-Rede comes from the Scottish Gaelic Carraig-a-Rede which means The rock in the road. It refers to the way the migrant salmons take along the coast. To get access to the best place to catch the salmons fishermen have put up a rope bridge here for over 350 years.

    I got a bit disappointed when I saw the bridge as I had imagined it to be longer, but the weather was nice and it is a beautiful place, so I was happy anyway.

    If weather permits the bridge is open daily:
    1 Jan - 27 Feb between 10.30 - 15.30
    28 Feb - 26 May between 10 - 18
    27 May 31 Aug between 10 - 19
    1 Sep - 31 Oct between 10 - 18
    1 Nov - 31 Dec between 10.30 - 15.30

    Final access to the rope bridge is 45 minutes before closing time. And if there are many visitors there might be a timed ticket system (occasionally) as there is a limited number of people who can cross the bridge at the same time.

    Admission was £5.60 (March 2011). Tickets are bought at a reception near the car park. From there there is a 1km walk along the coast to the rope bridge. By the car park there is also a Tea Room and toilets.

    Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge Carrick Island Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Ballintoy

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

43 travelers online now

Comments

Ballintoy Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Ballintoy things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Ballintoy sightseeing.

View all Ballintoy hotels