Bibury Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Hanau93
  • Things to Do
    by Hanau93
  • Things to Do
    by Hanau93

Most Recent Things to Do in Bibury

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    A walk through Bibury

    by King_Golo Written Jul 13, 2010

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    Arlington Row, Bibury

    Bibury is best discovered by foot, but as it is scattered over the hills you need some comfortable shoes. Start your walk at the inn on Bibury's main street, cross the bridge and turn left into a path through the thicket behind the meadow. It will take you to the village's main sight: the Arlington Row cottages. Built in the late 14th century, they were first used as a wool store for a nearby monastery. In the 17th century, the weavers lived in these cottages and the cloth they produced was dried on the meadow. Turn right and climb up the steep hill. Turn right at its top and walk down again into the village. There is a large trout farm at the bottom of the hill where you can purchase fresh fish or try your own luck fishing. Another sight is the Saxon church of St. Mary. Unfortunately I didn't have time to stop there, but I'll do that the next time.

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    Bibury Troutfarm

    by Hanau93 Written May 6, 2009

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    A definite must see on the list for Bibury. It is beautifully landscaped and we were so excited about being able to feed the trout- mind you the ducks nearby were just as excited..:) By all means buy the fish food and you will see the trout coming up, trying to get the morsels- great fun! The farm also has a gift shop, picnic and play area, fresh and smoked trout and a free car park. if you'd like to you can fish for your own trout something i passed on..:) Current opening hours are 9am (10am on Sunday) to 4pm

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    Arlington Row

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 12, 2007

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    Isn't that gorgeous (buildings I'm talking about)
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    On one side of the river is Arlington, reached on foot by crossing an old stone bridge. It's famous for its stone cottages with their steep pitched roofs. These cottages, whose origin goes back to the 16 hundreds, are known as Arlington Row and were converted from what was originally a hall used to store wool into weavers' homes. Standing looking at them, it's not hard to imagine the conversion.
    The workers supplied cloth for fulling at the 17th century Arlington Mill, which served, at one time, as a corn mill. The Mill, which is the building we first passed, now houses a folk and agricultural museum with one room dedicated to William Morris (artist and craftsman 1834-1896), the man whose descriptons of the place put it firmly on the tourist trail.
    There are those who would have you believe that these cottages have low door heights because people were smaller in those bygone days. Truth is that they actually sank a little as the whole place is more or less built on a swamp.

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    The old water mill

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 15, 2005

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    Nowadays you can eat here

    This is a 4 storey corn and fulling mill built in 1710. The machinery was sold for scrap in 1914 and the present machinery moved to the mill from North Cerney . It is now turned slowly by electricity and has no waterwheel as such but has been converted to a cafe and museum with nice views down to Bibury.
    It is one of Gloucestershire's best-known mills. The Domesday Book of 1086 records that even then there was a mill there, on the banks of the River Coln.
    Like those at Lower Slaughter, its present buildings date from its 17th century construction work. Many other aspects of its history can be traced through the pictures, photographs and documents on display in the mill's museum, and visitors can see the machinery which was brought to Bibury from the other mill at North Cerney.
    The museum has a restaurant and gift shop, and a new herb garden is being developed. Summer opening times are 10am to 6pm daily (10am to 5pm in winter).

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    Autumn Bibury

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 15, 2005

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    Photo revisited

    I always remember the picture. It was of the side entrance to a small church in Gostwyk in the New England area of N.S.W. The lamp sitting amongst some ivy. Trouble is, I lost the negative some time ago so getting an updated print of the by-now-grotty one was impossible and I had never seen it the same since.
    So, when I saw a similar set of circumstances whilst dining at the Swan Hotel it took me no time at all to extract my camera and rack off a couple of shots, this one being the best in my opinion.
    I hope you get some enjoyment out of it too.
    This is where the name, albeit grossly corrupted, is believed to have come from. Bibury: ‘Beage’s burg (hill or fortified place). There is a documentary reference in the early 8th century to land granted to Beage, daughter of Earl Leppa.

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    Authentic is the word

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 15, 2005

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    Bridge over calmer waters
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    You get the immediate feeling as you enter Bibury that this is a for-real village. Crossing the stone bridge into the stone town with the ivy dripping down the walls puts a smile on your face.
    You will be coming by car or bike because, unless you're on a tourist coach, there's little or no public transport here. There is a bus service but you'll want to check up first as they don't run regularly.
    The River Coln flows through Bibury, sandwiched between the main village street and an expanse of boggy watermeadow known as Rack Isle. With Arlington Row as a backdrop, it makes one of the most picturesque scenes you will find in the Cotswolds.
    In the second picture you'll see Rosemarie on the footbridge (now there's another way you could get there!) which is adjacent to the road bridge.

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    The cotswold stone

    by iandsmith Written Dec 15, 2005

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    Hard not to like
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    Its beige and weathered, in Bath it's oolite but, whatever they call it, it's a type of sandstone and it looks so pretty. Especially when you stick a few flowers in the garden and put a thatched roof on top, then it's to die for, but even slate roofs enhance the spectacle and there's enough here to satisfy the jaded eye.

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    Rate payers only

    by iandsmith Written Dec 15, 2005

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    Look, but don't touch

    Right smack in the middle of the village, across the road from the Swan Hotel, is this cute little well-maintained park. After taking a shot I tried to move in and get some closeups. Unlucky, there's a sign, that I managed to obey, that says it's for locals only, i.e. those that are paying rates for its upkeep.
    I'm still trying to think where I've ever come across that situation before.

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    Water water everywhere

    by iandsmith Written Dec 15, 2005

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    Fountain in the fishy garden

    The Mill, with its working water wheel, looks down on trout swimming lazily in crystal clear spring water. Over a century old, the Bibury Trout Farm (founded 1902) spawns 10 million Rainbow trout each year.
    Visitors can buy them smoked, fresh or, fish for their own. Personally, coming from a country where it's pretty much open slather, I rebel against paying to fish.
    A park and gardens only serve to add to the beauty of the spot. The actual village of Bibury, on the other side of the river, so small you could jump across it (well, when I was younger maybe) is grouped around St. Mary's Church. The Saxon part of the church dates from the 8th century.

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    Arlington Row...

    by coceng Written Jul 28, 2004
    Bibury in The Cotswold

    The row was originally a timber framed hall used to store The Bishop of Worcester's wool, but the hall was converted into a row of cottages in the 17th century.
    These National Trust owned weavers' cottages is perhaps the most photographed sight in The Cotswold, spawning on stamps, calendars, guidebooks, postcards & even on chocolate boxes !
    Close-up on one cottage, so beautiful !

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    Arlington Row...

    by coceng Written Jul 28, 2004

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    Bibury in The Cotswold

    The row was originally a timber framed hall used to store The Bishop of Worcester's wool, but the hall was converted into a row of cottages in the 17th century.
    These National Trust owned weavers' cottages is perhaps the most photographed sight in The Cotswold, spawning on stamps, calendars, guidebooks, postcards & even on chocolate boxes !
    Bibury is actually consists of two villages, Arlington on one side of the River Coln and Bibury on the other. It is certainly one of the 'must see' destinations in the Cotswold, mostly because of Arlington Row !

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    Arlington Row...

    by coceng Written Jul 28, 2004
    Bibury in The Cotswold

    The row was originally a timber framed hall used to store The Bishop of Worcester's wool, but the hall was converted into a row of cottages in the 17th century.
    These National Trust owned weavers' cottages is perhaps the most photographed sight in The Cotswold, spawning on stamps, calendars, guidebooks, postcards & even on chocolate boxes !
    I would really love to live in any of these houses ! At the same time, I MUST be a billionaire to take care of the property ! It's not cheap...

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  • coceng's Profile Photo

    Arlington Row...

    by coceng Updated Jul 28, 2004
    Bibury in The Cotswold

    The row was originally a timber framed hall used to store The Bishop of Worcester's wool, but the hall was converted into a row of cottages in the 17th century.
    These National Trust owned weavers' cottages is perhaps the most photographed sight in The Cotswold, spawning on stamps, calendars, guidebooks, postcards & even on chocolate boxes !
    I 'checked' the cottages; Beautiful, adorning with flowers.
    These cottages although owned by The National Trust are not museums ! Meaning they are privately owned houses where the owners are dwelling in them...

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    The Most Beautiful Village...

    by coceng Updated Jul 28, 2004
    Bibury in The Cotswold

    Bibury is being tipped as one of the most beautiful villages in England !
    It was prospered during the 17th & 18th century from the wool trade. However, its demise in early 19th century led to hard times & riotings from the villagers !
    This had led to a substantial number of its inhabitants being shipped off to the penal colonies in Australia.
    This is the end of the path that we took, along the stream or rather River Coln. Took this photo as I looked behind me...

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    Arlington Row...

    by coceng Updated Jul 28, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bibury in The Cotswold

    The row was originally a timber framed hall used to store The Bishop of Worcester's wool, but the hall was converted into a row of cottages in the 17th century.
    These National Trust owned weavers' cottages is perhaps the most photographed sight in The Cotswold, spawning on stamps, calendars, guidebooks, postcards & even on chocolate boxes !
    Actually, when I was there, there were many Japanese tourists loitering around the place, taking photos with expensive equipments !
    I had to wait for them all to dispers from the area to take this photo !

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