Bristol Restaurants

  • Caffe Gusto, Bristol
    Caffe Gusto, Bristol
    by spidermiss
  • My coffee and courgette cake!
    My coffee and courgette cake!
    by spidermiss
  • Mackenzies Cafe Bar, Bristol
    Mackenzies Cafe Bar, Bristol
    by spidermiss

Best Rated Restaurants in Bristol

  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Avon Gorge Hotel: Views!

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dinner at the Avon Gorge Hotel

    The Avon Gorge Hotel offers accommodation in the picturesque suburb of Clifton.

    Though the main drawcard of the Hotel is the large terrace which forms part of the Bar/Restaurant, and has spectacular views of the Avon Gorge and the Suspension Bridge.

    It is a fabulous site - worth a look even if you don't end up eating here. We had dinner here one night, and braved the cold (summer!) night to dine alfresco and watch the sun set.

    Favorite Dish: The food wasn't very good.....I had a tuna dish that had no flavour, and an average sticky toffee pudding. The wine was ok

    Prices were not too bad considering the location.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    Brunel's buttery: Who ate all the pies?

    by TheLongTone Updated Jun 27, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brunel's Buttery is situated by the waterside of the floating harbour, about 400 metres along the quay from the Princes St. swing bridge. It's just a shed serving snacks with outside seating, but they don't rely on the pleasant surroundings to bring in the trade. Excellent bacon sandwiches, vast slices of cake and home-made pies that actually contain meat rather than the all too common toxic sludge. A great place, weather permitting, and it's popularity can result in fairly epic queues.

    Favorite Dish: A pie for me, if there are any left. Now that the boys are no longer vegetarians, they'll do a bacon sandwich. With chips.

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  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    One Stop Thali Cafe: The choice is theirs

    by TheLongTone Updated Nov 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a restaurant claiming to get it's inspiration from the street food of India, and I havn't come across anywhere quite like it. It's like a typical new bristol cafe, (casual atmosphere and an assortment of retro furniture) with a suitably garish fuscia and cerulean blue paint scheme and is a paradise for those who dither over menus only to find that what the people at the next table are eating looks much better. Because all there is on offer here is the thali of the day: a compartmented plate loaded with pillau rice, a dhall of some description, a couple of vegetarian curries and some raita. Your only choice is whether you want pickles and chapattis or poppadoms with it, and what to drink. But basically you eat what's put in front of you. And very good it is too.

    Favorite Dish: Actually I've never eaten here, I simply use their novel takaway service. Expensive the first time, since you need to buy an Indian tiffin-carrier for £20 (including food inside). After that you take your tiffin carrier along and they'll fill it for £6. Good deal, Lucille.

    Sunday night is music night, with some kind of live entertainment and all thalis a knockdown £5.

    Open Tuesdays-Sundays 6pm-11pm.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    SIESTO ON THE HIPODROME café: -last coffee before we leave

    by mindcrime Written Apr 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Siesto on the Hipodrome Cafe
    1 more image

    We were supposed to leave from Bristol by bus one cold sunday morning with Megabus. The bus of this company departs opposite the Colston Hall so there is no station to buy cofee, water or whatever. It was Sunday morning and everything was closed. Hopefully, we noticed that Siesto On The Hipodrome was open right on the main square.

    The prices were ok (cappuccino £2.05, Macchiato £1.60, Latte £1.85 etc) and they also serve many sandwiches, pastry etc) There was only one problem, there is no WC!! So, I stopped drinking my tea till I get to the bus :))

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  • JuliaK's Profile Photo

    Taste of Morocco: The closest that I can be to Morocco (for now)

    by JuliaK Updated Mar 26, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The food is mainly Moroccan. Spices and authenticity makes that restaurant one of my favorites!! they are using the best of traditional and contemporary cuisine and the finest ingredients. And as it says on their leaflet
    "Discover tha range of flavours of the Mediterranean shores, the Sigh Atlas, the Sahara and more..."

    Favorite Dish: All the lamb dishes and fallafel as a starter

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • JuliaK's Profile Photo

    Hope and Anchor: English pub with character

    by JuliaK Updated Dec 1, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is not the typical pub thas serves only burgers and chips...
    They have a wide variety of snacks/meals and the best sandwiches in town. It is beautiful to go when the weather is nice and sunny and you can enjoy your drink and food at the back garden. The atmospere is so relaxed that you feel that you are at a friends back garden. The staff as well is so cool !!! And the prices are more than friendly!

    Favorite Dish: 1)Brie, Salami on wholemeal bread +
    2) Fries with cheese-cheddar ( the most "cheesy" fries that you will ever eat!!! they put a so much cheese that it should cost them more than the fries...)

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    The Hatchet Inn: Oldest Inn

    by Balam Written Oct 18, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Hatchet Inn
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    The Hatchet Inn is one of if not The Oldest Pub in Bristol. It has a great history and this old Tudor timbered house has probably the finest facade in Bristol although the interior has been ripped out and nothing much of note remains.
    The Inn dates from 1606 and the building probably earlier than that but it has undergone some significant alteration (It is a grade II Listed Building) It has a fantastic 300 year old door that is said to contain layers human skin under it's tar coating.

    The main part of the building was originally a small farm house in Frog Lane which was once the main route to the then remote village of Clifton and the pubs name is thought to originate from the axes (hatchets) that local woodsmen used in Clifton Woods.
    Until the end of the nineteenth century it had large gardens with a cockpit for betting on the Cock fights that were popular at the time, In 1775 Samuel Maddock owned the Inn and it was known as No. 25 Frog Lane and buildings on each side of the Inn were hoses which turned into shops but these were demolished and the space left used to provide extensions to the Inn.

    We had a drink here and shared a delicious combo for a late lunch. I would love to visit again for food or for a night out. The Pub is one of Bristols best Rock and Alternative Music Venues and regularly has live bands and DJ's in the evenings.

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting

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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    Wessex Flyer: Steak at the Table Table

    by grayfo Written Apr 14, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Family restaurant/pub that is part of the Table Table chain and attached to the Premier Inn. The restaurant is divided into several distinct areas, including family and adult dining areas, and a lounge bar for drinkers. Stone and carpeted floors throughout, with comfortable seating and a rustic feel.

    Monday to Sunday: 12:00 noon to 10:00 pm

    February 2010

    Favorite Dish: 8oz 28 Day Matured Sirloin Steak, Roasted Cherry Tomatoes, Flat Mushroom and Chunky Chips - £12.50

    Extra Feast: Garlic & Herb Breaded Mushrooms, Battered Onion Rings and Garlic Bread - £2.99

    Carling Shandy - £2.87

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  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    The Bristolian: Bacon,sausage ad egg no more....

    by TheLongTone Updated Jan 16, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Bristolian closed at the end of 2011. Sic transit gloria mundi. Victim ofthe Collape of the West. I'm not scrubbing the tip as a tribute to the place and to Cath, the owner and usually the fryer of your egg.

    I am very fond of the Bristolian. It's not a greasy spoon, it's a Bristol Cafe, with a good ambience as well as good food. Tretchikoffs on the wall, an eclectic choice of music on the stereo, a sunburst clock on the wall forever stopped at ten to three (and is there honey still for tea?) and a good selection of reading matter, including the complete works of Joseph Conrad. I have to say that the service is ofen very slow (it's a Bristol Cafe, just chill It takes time because they're cooking it for you) but not by any means long enough to read The Secret Agent, let alone Nostromo.

    The choice is fairly limited but all good: there's generally a special of the day, staples such as bacon sandwiches, very good mackerel pate with salad (omega 3 oils and vegetables) smoked salmon and scrambled eggs or the house speciality, the Bristolian breakfast: bacon, sausage, egg, beans, mushrooms tomato and sauteed potatoes. Available in small or large, which doubles up the sausages and bacon. Really there is no higher praise of a cafe than to say 'I'd eat the sausages'. And if you're a vegetarian (like both my boys) you can get a veggie version.

    Favorite Dish: Well, I'm only small, and not really a Bristolian, so I go for the small Bristolian. An all-day breakfast that will keep you going all day.

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  • northeast80's Profile Photo

    Zero Degrees: Micro Brewery

    by northeast80 Updated Apr 11, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most recent visit April 2011.
    Not just a restaurant but a bar too.
    Zero Degrees has the building purpose built for them, I used to visit Bristol before I lived here and remember it opening and being very excited. A micro-brewery, in Bristol, how novel.

    It's in an excellent location; at the top of Christmas Steps, if you sit upstairs in the restaurant area you get a good view of the passers-by and if you sit on the balcony you get a great view of Colston St looking down Christmas Steps, to the Alms Houses and the hills peeking through the buildings.

    Being a micro-brewery all the brewing equipment is insde and open to view so expect polished concrete, dark wood and Ron Arad chairs.

    Favorite Dish: The beer of course;
    Pilsner
    Pale Ale
    Black Lager
    Wheat Ale
    Seasonal (mostly tends to be mango beer the times I've been in)
    Pints are £2.90, Seasonal are £3.

    I supose I should mention the food now.....I've eaten a few times and have had either pizza or muscles. Friend's have been disapointed (food with chili has not tasted spicy at all) but I've always enjoyed mine. Muscles come with a wedge of lemon and a bowl of french fries with mayo, they're served in a nice cooking pot where the lid can be used to put all the shells in. I've had Thermidore and Mariniere, but tried my friend's Thai Green Curry one and it was overly salted, the same night I had Thermidore which wasn't salty. They cost £13.95.
    When I went most recently the coffee came when everyone had finished their dessert which wasn't very good, I didn't leave a tip as we had a different waiter for all courses.

    Open Mon - Sat : 12.00-24.00 | Sun – 12.00-23.00.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    The Llandoger Trow: Great Traditional Fayre!

    by spidermiss Updated Jun 30, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Llandoger Trow
    2 more images

    This historic pub with a Brewsters Fayre restaurant is adjacent to where I stayed. As I was under the weather at the time, I chose to eat there as I didn't fancy venturing out far for my evening meal.

    The Landroger Trow dates back to the 17th Century where Captain Hawkins retired and ran the pub after sailing a Trow (a flat bottomed sailing barge) across the Severn between South Wales and Bristol. Llandoger is associated with Llandoger which had five gables and was situated besides the Welsh beck where ships from across the Severn were moored. The pub originally occupied one of the gables but subsequently occupied the remaining gables but one. However, during the bombing of World War II the two end gables were destroyed so only three remain today. Daniel Dafoe and Alexander Selkirk are part of the legends that is associated with the Llandoger Trow. It is believed that Dafoe and Selkirk (with the Robinson Crusoe connection) met there. There are also links to Robert Louis Stevenson.

    Today there is a lively pub downstairs but I liked the rather quieter restaurant with its traditional refurbishings where I enjoyed my meal.

    Favorite Dish: I ordered a mixed grill (rump steak, gammon, sausages, fried egg, chips, tomatoes and peas) with onions rings stack. This was accompanied with a large glass of white white (Pinot Grigrio).

    I thoroughly enjoyed my meal and will not hesitate to eat there again.

    It came to 17 gbp including tip.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    The Rummer Hotel: One of the City's Oldest Inns

    by spidermiss Updated Jun 30, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rummer Hotel
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    The Rummer Hotel was the City's new Exchange in 1743 that fixed the old inn's name and present structure. The merchants of Bristol were looking for a suitable meeting place for discuss their business needs as Bristol was thriving in the merchant world.

    John Wood designed the building and as well as playing a big part in his Exchange scheme and yet he wanted to rebuild the inn with its side entrance as well as a main one for the Exchange. The same site goes back as far the medieval times when inns began occupying the site. A lot of the interior today goes back the the 17th and 18th Century.

    John Palmer signed a contract with the Postmaster General for the carriage of mail by coaches. The coaching Inn played a part on the London to Bristol route and The Rummer became Bristol's first inn. In August 1784 the first coach arrived at the Rummer Tavern after a 15 hour journey from London!

    The Rummer played a big part of Bristol's history from the Elizabethan times to England's Civil War. The hotel was closed at the beginning of the 21st Century but reopened in December 2005 after not running for 8 years.

    It a pleasant hotel with a bar and offers fine dining from brunch to Sunday roasts!

    It's nice to talk a break from sightseeing to enjoy coffee and cake in Bristol Oldest inns!

    Favorite Dish: I ordered an Americano coffee (1.85 gbp) and Courgette Cake (2.00 gbp). The courgette cake was delicious and reminds me a lot of carrot cake.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Food and Dining
    • Architecture

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  • northeast80's Profile Photo

    Mezze at The Green Dragon: Mediterranean medley

    by northeast80 Written Mar 24, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just some of the metze dishes
    3 more images

    I have been here twice now; the first visit in Dec 2010, the second visit March 2011.
    For Christmas we had a 3 course set meal; I had a duck, tangerine & rocket salad, monkfish in a butterbean and curry sauce, and sticky toffee pudding and was so full afterwards I almost burst!
    Open for food from 11am - 10pm. Brunch stops being served from 5pm.

    In March we went for a colleague's leaving do and had the Mezze which cost £3.95 a dish or x3 dishes for £10. We ordered the below and still ended up taking x2 take away containers home for the next day! We also shared a bottle of houes white (Chillean sauvignon blanc which was delicious)

    The restaurant is bright and airy and the waiters very nice and all seem to be Mediterranean which helps with the ambiance. It has wooden floors, pretty wallpaper and comfy seats, some benches and some upholstered dining seats.

    The room upstairs is available for free private hire, we had our Christmas meal up here, they have flat screen TVs showing a fire!

    Favorite Dish: Between 7 of us we paid £12.50 each (we paid for the 8th person between us) so.....the 8 of us had;
    x2 Hummous (in a large bowl with olive on top)
    x2 Rickinta (seasoned rice)
    x2 Nachos (in a large bowl with guacamole, jalapenos, cheese and sour cream)
    x3 Patatas Bravas (not spicy, I didn't think)
    x2 Calmari (delicious)
    x2 Prawn tava (in a butter, lemon, garlic sauce) (another of my favourites)
    x3 Duck borek (could have done with a bit more hoi sin sauce)
    x3 Lamb kofta (large and tasty)
    x3 Chicken souvlaki (not much seasoning)
    x3 Chorizo con rioja (rather fragrant, in a surprising / odd way)
    x3 BBQ chicken (needed more sauce)

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    KING WILLIAM ALE HOUSE: by the fire!

    by mindcrime Written Apr 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    King William Ale House
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    We entered at King William Ale House by accident one cold afternoon that we just wanted a place to warm up a bit before heading for a night club. We loved the no smoking lounge and especially the real coal fire in front of us!(pic 2) We stood there next to the fireplace and we returned the next day again. There are other rooms too (the main bar is further inside the pub) and we noticed many bar games, dominoes, jenga etc There are darts n pool tables upstairs but it was very cold for us there :)

    We payed £3.30 for two pints although the next day we tasted several different beers from the list (Samuel Smith Sovereign Keg Bitter, Samuel Smith’s Extra Stout, Prinz Strong Lager etc). We also tried the kitchen that has some average main plates(pic 4) but the prices are great(£5.95 each)

    The pub is open all day till 23.00 but the food is served til 21.00

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Nero café: coffee time

    by mindcrime Written Apr 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    checkin Park Street from Nero caf��
    1 more image

    Although there are many cozy cafes in Bristol we were desperate for a coffee after visiting the City Museum so we visited Nero Café that was opposite the museum. It was nice sitting there and watch the people passing by on Park street.

    The self service stuff was quick and the cappuccino that costs £2.35 tasty :) They also have hot chocolate and several pastry to choose from. Actually Nero Café is a huge coffee chain in UK with about 400 stores (I saw 3 of them in Bristol!)!

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