NOT Bristol!, Bristol

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  • NOT Bristol!
    by Arkeolog
  • NOT Bristol!
    by B_Caro
  • NOT Bristol!
    by Mengke
  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    Not Bristol, and not Stonehenge either.

    by TheLongTone Updated Aug 29, 2010

    Stonehege is of course world-famous and like a true Brit local I've never visited it, although I have seen it from the road. All that tourist infrasructure thing isn't to my taste: leaves no room for the imagination to work.

    STANTON DREW s another kettle of fish entirely. There are actually the remains of three stone circles here, plus a couple of outliers: the shree stones known as the Cove, which are in the garden of the village pub, the Druid's Arms. The largest. at 113 metres in diameter, is, after Avebury, the second-largest stone circle in Britain. Twenty seven out of a probable thirty remain.

    Developed it isn't: it's a bit of somebody's farm, and cows wander among the stones. There's a ltttle parking area and an honesty box on the gate for your £1 admission, and there's a holder of A4 information sheets

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    CROSS THE BORDER TO WALES

    by jetwind Updated Aug 17, 2006

    Day trip to Wales

    As the welsh Capital is just 45 miles away then why not spend a day in Cardiff

    „X Castle
    „X Millinuem stadium
    „X Cardiff Bay
    „X Bay cruises

    Read by cariff page for indepth infomation%c

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    Roman Bath in BATH

    by Arkeolog Written Sep 19, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bath

    Nestling in between 7 hills between the Mendips and the Cotswolds ,in South West England Bath is an architectural masterpiece , on every UK tourists 'must see' destination list and rightly so. First settled by the Celts, whom legend has is it discovered the hot springs medicinal qualities. Then occupied by the Romans, who promptly built their own temple and spa - Sulis Minerva.

    By the 17th century Bath had become a fashionable resort, 'taking of the waters' being particularly popular. Many of Baths finest buildings were constructed in the next 150 years. Pulteney Bridge (1774), designed by Robert Adam is one such example. Downstream of the Bridge is a park, with a Bandstand and superb flower displays in Summer.

    Why not take a cruise along the River? Boats leave from the steps below Pulteney Bridge. Also completed in 1774 , and well worth the walk uphill from Bath town centre, is The Royal Crescent, not in fact a semi circle but an ellipse. No 1 The Royal Crescent, has been restored in Georgian style.
    The famous Pump Rooms were completed in 1790. Adjacent, in the Church Yard is Bath Abbey, with its imposing West Front. Dating from the 16th century, the Abbey was constructed to replace the ruinous Norman Cathedral. The Abbey contains some particularly fine stained glass, and superb fan vaulting. The Church Yard itself attracts street entertainers such as the juggler seen in these photographs.
    The Romans Baths themselves were not rediscovered until 1880. They leave a memorable impression on any one seeing them for the first time. Take a tour of the ruins with a hand held commentary.
    Leading off Baths main shopping streets are numerous side alleys ( known locally as passages )crammed with yet more shops and restaurants, a delight at any time of year. Though Bath is best explored on foot, one may be tempted to take an 'Official Bath Tour' in an open topped double decker bus, complete with commentary by an informed guide - an ideal way of seeing Bath if time is limited.

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  • Pulteny Bridge

    by jameswiseman Written Aug 26, 2002

    This is the only bridge in the UK and one of only a few in Europe with shops on it. If you walk in the direction of the city centre and take a left just off the bridge you are able to see the wier and look over the gardens. The entrance the gardens is about fifty metres futher on.

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  • Geoff_Wright's Profile Photo

    The River Exe rises high up in...

    by Geoff_Wright Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    The River Exe rises high up in the hills of Exmoor, in Somerset. It cuts across the county of Devon, and emerges into the English Channel at Exmouth, some 55 miles from its source. Following disasterous floods in recent years, the river at Exeter has been tamed somewhat but it is still a beautiful area to visit. The most picturesque location is, perhaps, the old port area, now a tourist attraction, with various shops and restaurants. The rope ferry is a popular method of crossing the river at this point. There is a very large multi-storey car park within a few minutes' walk of the quayside.

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    The countryside around...

    by Geoff_Wright Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The countryside around Exeter. For part two of this page please see the Travelogue on Dartmoor Just click here: Geoff's Dartmoor Page

    Related to:
    • Cycling

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    The Cathedral Close is a...

    by Geoff_Wright Written Aug 25, 2002

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    The Cathedral Close is a beautiful area of elegant old houses overlooking the Cathedral Green. This area contains, amongst other attractions, the Bishop's palace and its gardens, Mol's Coffee House with its elegant panelled room which still retains the Elizabethan atmosphere, and next to it St Martins church, built of the local red sandstone. Cathedral Close is but one row of buildings from the main High Street, but it is in a world of its own!

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    Exeter is an ancient city and...

    by Geoff_Wright Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Exeter is an ancient city and was inhabited by the Romans, who knew it as 'Isca', this being the Roman word for water. (The name 'Exe' is the old British form of isca meaning 'water'). The Romans constructed a road known as the 'Fosse Way', from Lincoln to Exeter, parts of which still exist. The Saxons settled in Exeter, building on many Roman sites, and in the 10th century Exeter was plundered by the Danes. The Norman castle in Exeter was one of a number erected by William the Conqueror (1066-1154) to guard the West of England. The castle consisted at the centre, of an earthwork and wooden fortifications. The earthwork was a mound, called a 'motte', on top of which was a wooden tower. At the foot of the 'motte' was a rectangular enclosure known as a 'bailey'. The picture here is of the remains of the medieval 'Exe Bridge' which used to cross the river at this point. It has now been replaced by a large modern roundabout, which straddles the river.

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  • Geoff_Wright's Profile Photo

    Exeter Cathedral is....

    by Geoff_Wright Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    Exeter Cathedral is. naturally, the focal point of the city. It evolved from a Saxon cathedral of 1055 and its successor, the Norman building, of which the two transeptal towers, built in 1275, were incorporated in the present cathedral. Its style is of the middle Gothic period. Early English buildings had narrow pointed windows, called lancets, often arranged in groups of three, or five. The second stage Gothic, called Decorated (covering the reigns of the three Edwards c. 1270-1370), is marked by a great development in the tracery of windows and by the use of geometric patterns. On the west facade is the largest surviving array of fourteenth-century sculpture, and Exeter chathedral is known as the best Decorated in England.
    The bells in the north tower include one which is the oldest of its weight in Britain, cast in 1616. The south tower has a ringing peal of 13 bells with a weight of over 13.5 tonnes, the tennor, 'Grandisson', weighing 3.5 tonnes. The cathedral was badly damaged during the air raids of 1942, but the damage was repaired by patient reassembly of the stone and excellent replication of the original work.

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    Stonehenge

    by B_Caro Written Aug 24, 2002

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    My visit to Stonehenge was a rather disappointing one. I expected to see something much more impressive and bigger.

    That day there was a really cold wind with lots of rain. And I was ill too that day, so maybe that’s also a reason why Stonehenge didn’t impress me at all, who knows.

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    Tour the Bath Abbey.

    by jtb2inky Written Aug 24, 2002

    This is a beautiful abbey to visit. Many wonder why it is not classified as a cathedral. The answer is that only one cathedral can technically exist per geographic area that it represents. This is called a diocese. The diocese for the Somerset area in southwest England has its' cathedral (and a beautiful cathedral it is) in Wells. Bath is a bigger city than wells, and the abbey is as big as a cathedral, but it is technically an abbey nonetheless. The ceiling in the abbey is spectacular. Pay particular attention to the fan vaulting. On the front entrance (the west front) of the abbey you will notice two ladders depicted in stonework on either side of the main doors. On the ladders angels are shown climbing up and down from the heavens. It is quite a piece of sculpture.

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    Visit the Roman Baths in Bath.

    by jtb2inky Written Aug 24, 2002

    If you cannot get to Rome in your lifetime - shame on you. Seriously though, if you cannot get to Rome, you should at least get to Bath and its' Roman Baths. I remember when I was a kid looking at pictures of my mom and dad in Bath on their honeymoon. I promised myself way back then that I would visit the baths someday. Finally in March of 2002 it came to be. Now I had been to Rome before coming to Bath, but in all my ventures into the Roman world I had never seen Roman baths as intact as they are here in Bath. They are unique and special. They are also beautiful. Come in the morning when the steam is really pouring off the thermally heated water. Venture into the different rooms with there different temperatures of water. This was a very important part of the Roman lifestyle. It was both therapeutic and spiritual. I find it very much the same for visitors today, never mind the fact that you cannot actually get into the water (although a sap is to open up later in 2002 that will permit that). There is an audio guide for the tour that takes about 1-2 hours depending on how in depth you wish to go. For those traveling with small children, strollers are not allowed. But they do offer some really good backpacks that the child can sit in while you stroll about. Our son loved this. After visiting the Baths stop in the pump room for a glass of the mineral-laden water. It has an interesting aftertaste.

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    Take a hop on, hop off,...

    by jtb2inky Written Aug 24, 2002

    Take a hop on, hop off, double-decker tour bus ride of Bath.
    These tour bus rides are featured in just about every city in the United Kingdom depending on what time of year it is. The bus tours in Bath operate year-round. This is a really good activity, especially if you have limited time in the city, or would like an orientation tour. Some tours last 1 1/2 hours and travel in Bath and the countryside around it. Other tours last only 45 minutes and focus on the city of Bath itself. On the day we went we were only charged £4 per ticket. The normal price is £6 per ticket. This was do to the fact that when we boarded the skies were a bit gray and the driver did not think that it was an optimal time for a tour. We had the bus nearly to ourselves, and when we finally started the tour, the skies opened up to beautiful sunshine and warmth. This was a great time!

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    Mengke's Things to Do Tip

    by Mengke Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Ancient stone circles of massive proportions, perhaps built for sun worship. The axis points at sunrise at Summer Solstice. It began around 3000BC as a ditch in the ground, and was built up with bluestones and sarsen stones over the next1300yrs. Plugs and holes were formed in the stones to prevent them from slipping.

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  • Kodi01's Profile Photo

    The Roman Baths!

    by Kodi01 Updated Jun 25, 2003

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    Bath

    Bath is a city not too far from Bristol.

    Romans bathed there 2000 years ago and this is UK's only natural hot springs.

    There are Turkish baths also here.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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