Windsor Things to Do

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  • Things to Do
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  • Things to Do
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Best Rated Things to Do in Windsor

  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Crooked Tea-rooms

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    The Crooked Tea-rooms

    This was a tough one, should it go under restaurants or a Must-see!

    As I didn't eat in there, I have opted for the latter. This building is right next to the Guildhall. It is very wonky, and slopes to one side quite considerable.

    When I photographed it, I thought that by including the pillar thing in the foreground, it might help to emphasis just how wonky this building is, however I'm not quite sure if this has worked!

    If you aren't convinced, then the name of the Tea-rooms (i.e. the Crooked Tea-rooms) may just help to reassure you!

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Entrance to the Old Station

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Entrance to the Old Station

    Windsor, despite being a small town, actually has two stations. I'm not quite sure on the history, but this one is much more ornate (the other is purely functional and is a bit further from the town centre).

    Although the building itself is massive, these days all that remains in terms of actual trains, is a single track line (yes, SINGLE track!) to Slough, a distance of only a few miles.

    As the building is much much too big for just a single line, the rest of it has been very thoughtfully renovated, this being the entrance. It is now full of shops as it has become an indoor shopping centre of sorts. For what it looks like inside, please see my coffee tip under shopping.

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    The Thames

    by Dabs Updated Feb 10, 2008

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    Thames River
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    In order to get from Windsor Castle over to Eton, you must cross over the Thames River (pronounced Tems) on the Windsor Bridge which was designed by Charles Hollis in 1824. It was originally a toll bridge open to non pedestrian traffic, the toll was removed in 1898 and it was closed to vehicles in 1970.

    You can take a boat ride on the Thames or hire a rowboat or motor boat for a do it yourself trip.

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    The Castle

    by Nice2004 Written Nov 2, 2004

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    The Castle

    Of course you must visit the castle! You won't be able to miss it!

    I remember the days when it was free to get in! When I came home after being away for 5 years I just walked straight into the castle without paying as I'd always done before and got stopped by a policeman and asked "Excuse me, do you live here?!" Unfortunately not!

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    Eton

    by Dabs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Eton Chapel (2008)
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    Eton is a independent boarding school for roughly 1,300 boys between the ages of 13-18, it is called a "public" school but it is what Americans would call a private school, fees are paid by the family and in 2007 it cost a whoppping £26,490 per year. It is what Americans would call a prep(atory) school as most of the boys go on to college. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. There is a historical link with Cambridge University but they aren ot affiliated.

    Eton is a short walk from Windsor Castle, if you'd like to visit Eton, click on the Eton College website and it is listed under "Visits to Eton". Currently it appears to only be open to visitors from March-early October, there are guided tours that you can take (currently £5.50) or casual admission (currently £4.20) that allows access to the School Yard, College Chapel, The Cloisters, and the Museum of Eton Life. Even if you don't opt to pay the admission fee, it's a nice walk from Windsor and you can see the young men scurrying around in their tails and top hats, the uniform of a young lad at Eton.

    In August 2004, I did visit Eton as it was included on the London Pass. Unfortunately it was lunch time and the chapel was closed between 1 and 2 pm so all I got to see was the cloisters, the museum and the courtyard. Since it was "free" it was an OK visit but I think I would have been disappointed had I paid admission.

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    Windsor Castle

    by evaanna Updated Feb 12, 2006

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    Windsor Castle
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    The largest inhabited castle in the world, Windsor Castle was originally a fort on a hill established by William the Conqueror nearly nine hundred years ago. The Norman Keep, then a prison for his enemies, is now part of the great Round Tower in the Middle Ward.
    Successive kings greatly added to that, with Edward III heading the list of Windsor's great builders. It was also during his reign that Geoffrey Chaucer, the author of Canterbury Tales, lived at the Castle as a member of the royal household.
    The Castle is steeped in the history of the country and houses a wealth of treasures, many of which are displayed to the public, who can visit the State Apartments, the charming Queen Mary's Dolls' House, The Gallery and St George's Chapel.

    No photography allowed inside the residences.

    Admission: Adult - 13.50 GBP Child - 7.50 GBP
    Over 60/Student - 12 GBP
    If you book tickets in advance, you are charged 1 GBP extra per ticket.

    Free audio guide available.

    Last admission:
    March - October - 16.00
    Nov. - February - 15.00

    Closure times:
    March - October - 17.15
    Nov. - February - 16.15

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Guildhall, Windsor

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    The Guildhall, Windsor

    Apart from the castle, The Guildhall is considered to be Windsor's most prominent High Street building.

    I suppose one reason for its fame is that it was completed by Sir Christopher Wren in 1689. In case you haven't heard of Sir Christopher Wren, he is one of the most celebrated architects of the time, and was responsible for St Pauls Cathedral in London, one of Englands most famous buildings. He was also instrumental in helping to rebuild London after the Great Fire of London in 1666.

    I have to admit that whilst I find this building striking, it does not do an awful lot for me!

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    The Windsor castle

    by mallyak Written Sep 21, 2008

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    Windsor Castle is an official residence of The Queen and the largest occupied castle in the world. A Royal home and fortress for over 900 years, the Castle remains a working palace today.
    Visitors can walk around the State Apartments, extensive suites of rooms at the heart of the working palace. For part of the year visitors can also see the Semi State rooms, which are some of the most splendid interiors in the castle. They are furnished with treasures from the Royal Collection including paintings by Holbein, Rubens, Van Dyck and Lawrence, fine tapestries and porcelain, sculpture and armour.
    Within the Castle complex there are many additional attractions, including the Drawings Gallery, Queen Mary's dolls' house, and the fourteenth-century St. George's Chapel, the burial place of ten sovereigns and setting for many Royal weddings.
    PHOTOGRAPHY IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED INSIDE ROOMS

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Crooked house of Windsor!

    by mallyak Written Sep 22, 2008

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    This little black-and-white house looks like it's had too much to drink and tilts like a drunk towards one side!. Enjoy a light lunch, a Royal cream tea (tea and scones with clotted cream and jam) or dinner (bring your own wine). A member of the Slow Food movement, which advocates healthy eating, this adorable restaurant sources its produce locally.The building is supposed to be 300 years old!
    We did not eat in here!

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria outside Windsor Castle

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Queen Victoria outside Windsor Castle

    This statue of Quen Vicoria stands proudly outside Windsor Castle. It is pretty hard to miss!

    It was built to commemorate her 50th Jubilee (Golden Jubilee) which is to say she had been Queen for 50 years. She was the longest reigning British Monarch, although the current Queen (Elizabeth II) looks like she will be giving her a good run for her money and may well surpass her.

    Note:- Queen Elizabeth II celebrated her Golden Jubilee in 2002.

    Bizarre Note:- For some reason best known to themselves, the Spanish call Queen Elizabeth II - Reina Isobel. Isobel is a completely different name in English so I always find this strange!

    This picture was taken when the castle was in bright sunshine, and the black statue was in shade, hence the silhouette effect.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Multi-coloured post-boxes

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Multi-coloured post-boxes by Windsor Castle

    If you live in Britain, you soon realise that every post box you see is painted bright red. You never see anything different anywhere.

    That is why when you come to Windsor, it is quite bizarre to see both a red post box, and a blue one.

    You automatically go to see what the blue one is all about! In this case, it is a commemoration Post Box that commemorates the first air mail post. It was made during the reign of King George VI (the current Queens father) - it's possible to tell from the emblem on the front. As it is a commemoration Post Box, the box is sealed and it is not possible to post any letters inside.

    Great you think, I'll post my letters in the red one next door which is a standard issue Post Box (made during the current Queens reign). For some reason (I guess security?), this box is sealed too, so you have to find another further from the castle.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Old Steam Train

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Old Steam Train indoors

    I have to admit that this is a pretty bad picture! The sun was shining in very brightly from the side, and the only way I could stop it was to hold my lens cap in the picture!

    This old train is actually a reproduction of an old steam locomotive that finished life with the nameplate "The Queen" on it. It started off life being called "Emlyn", which is a boys name, so why the change of name and indeed gender!

    Well this locomotive (or at least the one this one is reproducing) was used to pull the Royal Train (I believe for Queen Victoria), and was renamed threafter. The original locomotive was retired in 1912, and no original examples of the class (GWR Achilles 4-2-2) exist today.

    This locomotive can be found in the Old Train Station/Shopping Mall right by the Single track station.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Green Victorian Post Box - still functional

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    The Green Victorian Post Box actually works!

    This is an old Victorian Post Box, and very different from the traditional post boxes we see in Britain today. It is much more intricate and ornate, and indeed is even a different colour to normal (red being the standard colour - indeed 'pillar-box red' is a well known colour in Britain!)

    Unusually being an unusual post box in Windsor, this one is actually in public service!

    It can be found at one of the side entrances to the old station/shopping mall, and is reasonably easy to miss so keep a good lookout!

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Windsor Castle, Union Jack, Queen Vic and the Moon

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Windsor Castle, Queen Vic and Moon

    This is the view you will get as you walk up the last part of Peascod Street towards the castle (well you might not see the moon, and you may not see the Union Jack Flag...)

    I like this view of the Castle. There should always be a flag flying on Windsor Castle. Typically it is the Union Jack like you see here. But not always...

    The reason the Union Jack does not always fly is that when the Queen is in residence at Windsor castle, the Union Jack is taken down and replaced with the Royal Standard. So if you visit Windsor, and you see a gold coloured flag with some Lions on, you will know the Queen is not too far away!

    This photo was taken a bit before 4 pm in late January shortly before it got dark. The moon was out rather early! You can see it here just to the right of the castle. Queen Victoria stands unmoving in the foreground.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Windsor Castle from the Long Walk

    by easyoar Updated Jan 25, 2005

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    Windsor Castle from the Long Walk

    Probably the best way to see Windsor Castle is to walk along the Long Walk. As you leave the castle, you will set off down a slope.

    After a while, you will start to go back up another slope. When you get to the top of this slope, turn around and look back. The whole of Windsor Castle will now be above the trees, including the round tower you see on the left of this picture (this tower will be hidden if you do not walk this far).

    If you wish to continue to the end of the Long Walk, you will need to cross a road near here, and then continue. You will see a ride on a horse in the distance which is a far as the Long Walk extends. It is a reasonable walk! Most tourists don't go the whole way!

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