Unique Places in Cambridge

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    Hinxton
    by balhannah
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    Hinxton
    by balhannah
  • Hinxton
    Hinxton
    by balhannah

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Cambridge

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    Foster Mill (Spiller's Flour Mill)

    by Airpunk Written Jul 17, 2012

    With its castle-like turret, the Spillers Flour Mill next to the train station is one of the tallest buildings in Cambridge. Built in 1898, it marked Cambridge's landscape as well as its economy for decades. The mill was operational until 2000 when it was decided to pull down the industrial building in this area to make room for new appartment buildings. The Flour Mill however will be part of the redevelopment in this area and will probably get a new life as an appartment building. A fire in 2010 caused certain damage, but did not change the plans to preserve the building. If you are at the train station, do a small detour to see how the restoration is going on.

    Foster Mill is located to the right of the train station (looking down from Station Road), between Station Road and Hills Road.

    Foster Mill (Spiller's Flour Mill, 2011)
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    Grafitti project at Newmarket Road

    by Airpunk Written Jul 3, 2012

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    At Newmarket Road, just a few steps away from the roundabout, you will find a grafitti art project from a group of artists called "Blight Society". The murals were finished in late 2010 and brighten up this rather deteriorated area with a large disused building and two closed down pubs. Hopefully, they are still there when you are on your next visit to Cambridge.

    The Grafittis are on what looks to be a former warehouse, close to the roundabout and the Grafton shopping mall.

    Grafitti project at Newmarket Road Grafitti project at Newmarket Road Grafitti project at Newmarket Road Grafitti project at Newmarket Road
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    Hunnybun Gravestones

    by Airpunk Written Jul 3, 2012

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    Next to the Holy Trinity Church, there is a small graveyard attracting some attention. That does not only come from its small size (although it is of course only the remain of a larger cemetery), but also from the unusual family name of the people buried there: Hunnybun. These 18 th century gravestones come from a time, when people’s surnames still were connected to their trade. The family was probably known for their sweet bakery.
    The stones are nothing to make a detour for, but just a nice curiosity right in the middle of Cambridge.

    Hunnybun Gravestones

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    Chapel of St. Mary Magdalene (Leper Chapel)

    by Airpunk Written Jun 2, 2012

    Although it is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Cambridge, few people know it even exists. It is a beautiful, well-preserved Romanesque building. The Chapel of St. Mary Magdalene (better known as the Leper Chapel) was built in the 12 th century and was once part of a Leper Hospital. Since then, it has remained pretty unchanged. King John granted the Leper Hospital the right to host an annual fair from 1199 on and this fair existed until 1933. Today, the fair was revived as a medieval event which raises funds to maintain the chapel. The chapel is usually closed for visitors, but can be visit with prior appointment or on special occasions like storytelling evenings, exhibitions or the fair.
    Coming from the city centre, the Chapel is located just over the railway bridge at Newmarket Road, on the left hand side. It is more or less in front of the Cambridge United Stadium. For further info or an appointment to visit the chapel, please contact the Cambridge Society for Past, Present and Future or the Friends of the Leper Chapel under the following URL:

    http://www.cambridgeppf.org/leper-chapel.shtml
    http://www.leper-chapel.24to24-hosting.co.uk/index.html

    The Leper Chapel
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    GORGEOUS VILLAGE OF HINXTON

    by balhannah Written Feb 3, 2012

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    I thought this little village was quite a find!
    Full of thatched roofed Cottage's, a Mill, church and a gorgeous thatched roof 17th Century Red Lion Inn, it had all the essential's that I thought an English village would look like, I loved it!
    Come and step back in time!

    Hinxton Hinxton Hinxton Hinxton Hinxton
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    Old gravestones - the Hunnybuns

    by angiebabe Updated Sep 20, 2009

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    A quick walk up a back lane way to Marks and Spencers took us a past the back of one of the churches - Holy Trinity Church - the laneway it appeared had been made through the old cemetary site with a few gravestones out on the opposite wall - looking at the gravestones that we went past made me laugh as knowing the old tradition of surnames coming about from the craft or employment that a man was involved here on some gravestones from the 1700s were the Hunnybuns! Conjured up all sorts of pictures of sweet and romantic characters!

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    St John's Church in Waterbeach

    by christine.j Written Aug 26, 2008

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    As it's often the case in small,English villages you can see very impressive churches there.

    I liked visiting the St John's church in Waterbeach.It's a very old church, part of it is from early 13th century, but it was restored in 19th century. From this time there are some mosaic ornaments on the pulpit, really beautiful. They added to the colourdul impression of the inside of the church, together with flowers and paintings.

    Sitting between the pipes of the organ we saw a special guest, raising its long ears to listen to the music? See for yourself, picture 3.

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    Waterbeach

    by christine.j Updated Aug 26, 2008

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    My son and I went on a very nice bicycle tour along the Cam to Waterbeach. On the way out of Cambridge, there is a bike lane, later this is shared with walkers. It was a beautiful ride, watching the boats on the Cam, passing the lock , going through a very green area to Waterbeach.
    From what I saw this is a very small place, very quiet when we were there in early afternoon.
    We didn't ride very fast, as I wanted to enjoy the scenery, but we didn't need more than 30 minutes. It takes longer to get out of Cambridge than to ride on the path to Waterbeach.

    It's about 8 km from Cambridge, on the trainline to Ely, so in case of bad weather we'd have taken the train to go there.

    Along the Cam

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    Local Football

    by soundchaseruk Written May 30, 2007

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    In Cambridge there are two semi-professional clubs, and your nearest to the centre is at Milton Road, just north of the river. At Cambridge City you can watch a game in friendly surroundings kick off normally at 3pm Saturdays and 7.45 pm Tuesdays.

    Around 500 people attend for £10 adults and £5 for under 16's. Food is available and the bar is open to all before and after the game

    Check the website for matches. The new season starts early August

    City take on a Spurs XI Danny at the ready action
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    Liittle St Mary's

    by leics Written May 10, 2006

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    St Mary the Less, on Trumpington Steet, so-called to distinguish it from Great St Mary's Church (obviously, perhaps). There was a church on this site from at least the early 12th century, the present building dating from 1352 . It is the chapel for Peterhouse College, the first college to be built in Cambridge.

    I didn't go inside (this time) but was entranced by the tiny and wonderfully overgrown churchyard at the rear of the church. Do make time to have a look........it's beautiful.

    Churchyard Churchyard
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    CAMBRIDGE SIGHTS

    by BerniShand Written Oct 23, 2005

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    As Cambridge is a university city you will of course see students, but these were a little special, a group of Kings choristers hurrying through the rain in their traditional uniforms and hats, only enough time to grab the camera and take a quick shot
    no time to take a shot of the two Dons who passed us by in their black gowns and caps [called mortar boards, because of the similarity between them and the boards builders use for applying plaster and mortar]
    being there as the university year was starting gave us many unusual sights - students carrying piles of book and pulling heavy cases on wheels, one had case in one hand and a huge potted plane in the other, and obviously new students with expressions varying from rabbit-caught-in-the-headlights worry, to elation and to awe at the sight of the world that will be theirs for a few years

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    A PLACE IN HISTORY

    by BerniShand Updated Aug 27, 2005

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    on the 28th of February 1953 Frances Crick announced in the The Eagle pub that he and James Watson had mapped the double helix of DNA, this wonderful achievement earned them the Nobel Prize

    on 28th February 2003 this plaque was unveiled at the Eagle by James Watson

    we didnt know this when we went in the Eagle for lunch, it was raining and we just wanted somewhere dry and warm with good food, but its another example of the history that is everywhere when you walk around Cambridge

    the plaque unveiled in 2003
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    The original Addenbrookes

    by sourbugger Written Jun 27, 2005

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    Addenbrookes hospital still exists, but is now located in a concrete maze to the south of the city.

    The Old, original Addenbrookes has been stunningly restored in the last few years, and now houses the management school of the university.

    Although not open to the public, it makes a change from looking at the rest of the archicture of Cambridge, fine though that is.

    The outpatients department is now Brown's Restaurant (see other tip).

    There would seem to be a certain irony in the fact that a hospital is now filled with management types with their collections of acyronmns and clipboards - much like every other hospital in the country ! Here, they even got rid of the patients.

    Addenbrookes...NOT a hospital

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    Arrive on the same platform as God....

    by sourbugger Written May 17, 2005

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    Every proposition is the result of truth operations on elementary propositions.

    Cambridge Railway station was the location where Ludwig Wittgenstein arrived back in England after a long absence. The announcement of his arrival caused mixed reactions among Ludwig's former colleagues. John Maynard Keynes: "Am I strong enough? Perhaps if I do not work between now and then, I shall be."

    January 18, 1928, Ludwig returned. Keynes wrote: "Well, God has arrived. I met him on the 5.15 train."

    If he had lived ina different era he would inevitably have arrived late, squashed and annoyed. His philosophy may have been entirely different.

    God is arriving on the next WAGN service...

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    Wittgenstein's diet

    by sourbugger Updated May 17, 2005

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    Follow in the footsteps of the 20th's century greatest philosopher by visiting Woolworths in Sidney street, Cambridge.

    It is said that Wittgenstein enjoyed thick brown sandwiches from Woolworths (i don't think they sell them anymore); lived on porridge for breakfast, vegetables for lunch, and an extraordinary amount of canned food.

    I have also heard it said that Ludwig once remarked there was better quality philosophical discourse happening amongst the shop girls in Woolies than in his seminar room !

    Cheese and pickle please

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