Chester Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Chester

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    The old Coffin

    by sandysmith Written Aug 31, 2003

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    saxon coffin

    The ruins of St John are the original east end and include part of the Norman chancel, the 14th century ;lady chapel and two meieval sidde chapels. For me the most intersting object though was an old coffin. This old coffin believed to be from the 13th century, bearing an inscription "Dust to Dust" was found by the sexton in the 19th century and set into the wall of the ruins of St John.

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    Ruins of St John

    by sandysmith Written Aug 31, 2003

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    ruins of St John

    Most people will visit Chester's impressive cathedral but the ruins ofChester's first cathedral - St John's - are not so well known. Indeed it was only after several visits myself that I came across them - adjacent to one end of Grosvenor Park.

    The church here was first begun in 1075, taking 200 years to build, reaching its most complete form in the late 13th century.

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    Deva Fortress Wall

    by sandysmith Updated Aug 26, 2003

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    the old fortress wall

    On the opposite side of the road to the Bridge of Sighs a section of the old Deva fortress wall can be seen. It may not look much but apparently its the "best preserved sections of Roman military wall in North-West Europe", so I guess it was worth a pic ;-) The wall was built as a stone facing to a large turf bank behind. The sandstone blocks were incorporated into the medieval wall.

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    Bluecoat Hospital

    by sandysmith Written Aug 26, 2003

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    Bluecoat Hospital

    Th Bluecoat Hospital was built as a charity school in 1717 but modifed in the 1850's.
    The adjacent city gaol had its dungeons cut deep into the sandstone, below the city wall. There were no windows in some so the only air prisoners got was by pipe.

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    Bridge of Sighs

    by sandysmith Written Aug 26, 2003

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    Bridge of Sighs

    So you reckon the bridge of Sighs is in Venice eh, well Cherster has one too - on Northgate (keep on going past the Town Hall as if going out of town). This stone footbridge was built in 1793 across the canal to link the city gaol with a chapel in the Bluecoat Hospital adajcent to it. Condemned prisioners crossed to the chapel to receive their last rights before their execution. Must admit the one in Venice is prettier.

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    Cobbled Streets

    by sandysmith Written Aug 25, 2003

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    St Mary's Hiill

    Well Chester is not just about black and white buildings. Did you know that Chester has one of the steepest cobbled streets in Britain. Well you can find it by St Mary's Hill which is not far from Castle Street (behind the Grosvenor Museum and the Military Museum. It really is steep, the picture doesn't really do it justice - can't see the bottom of it from the top due to the steepness.

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    Anchorite cell

    by sandysmith Written Sep 14, 2002

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    anchorite cell

    Chester legend holds that Harold, king of the Saxons, was not killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, but escaped and came to Chester, where he lived as a blind hermit in the Anchorite's Cell, a simple sandstone structure near the river.

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    Minerva's shrine

    by sandysmith Updated Sep 14, 2002

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    This shrine is unique in Western Europe, being the only one still 'in situ'. All the others have been taken to safety in museums. One could say that it was a pity this was not done in Chester. Having survived remarkably well for nearly two thousand years, it was badly vandalised several years ago. A copy and reconstruction are on view in Grosvenor Museum.

    Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom, and this shrine, carved into the rock in a Roman quarry nearly 2000 years ago, is the only one of its kind in Britain preserved at its original site. Although the carving has weathered badly you can, with imagination, make out that the figure appears to be carrying a spear in her right hand and that an owl looks over her left shoulder. These objects are symbols of the goddess Minerva, hence the attribution of the shrine. The soldiers would pray to her and make offerings, in the hope that she would protect them from danger.

    Location: Edgar's Field (lies by the Handbridge end of the Old Dee Bridge)

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    Did you know there were Roman...

    by bdbrewer Written Sep 4, 2002

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    Did you know there were Roman ruins in Chester? You didn't? Well, they are all over. Those Romans really were ahead of their times as tourist weren't they? Except they were bad tourists. They stayed, and stayed, and stayed ... :)

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    Bluecoat School

    by iwys Updated Apr 1, 2007

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    Bluecoat School was founded in 1700 to educate poor boys. Today it is a mixed Church of England secondary school.

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    Stanley Place

    by iwys Written Oct 13, 2006

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    Stanley Place is a fashionable, tree-lined Georgian Square, with elegant brick houses, just inside the western walls.

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    The Queen's School

    by iwys Written Oct 13, 2006

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    1 more image

    The Queen's School stands on the site of the "City Gaol and House of Correction". The school is housed in a beautiful brick Victorian building.

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    • School Holidays
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    Walking along the City Walls (4) Towards the city

    by MarvintheMartian Written Mar 27, 2004

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    From the Walls

    The walls encircle the city in a two mile loop, at this part you are looking towards the city from near the Northgate. Just to the right is the Town Hall.

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    The Drill Hall

    by sandysmith Written May 3, 2003

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    the old drill hall

    Originally built in 1868 as a training hall for the Royal Garrison Artillery and the Cheshire Rifle Volunteers it was dismantled in 1983 but this facade remains.

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    Chimneys

    by sandysmith Written Apr 24, 2003

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    rooftop view

    Walking around the walls (inbetween the canal locks and the cathedral) I spotted this unusual chimney and couldn't resist a snap!
    A fish, a rat and a frog have a great view of Chester up here!!

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Chester Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Chester off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Chester sightseeing.

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