Cathedral, Chester

4.5 out of 5 stars 34 Reviews

Chester Cathedral 01244 324756

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  • Former cloister of the monastery
    Former cloister of the monastery
    by Airpunk
  • Chester Cathedral
    Chester Cathedral
    by Airpunk
  • Sculpture in the cloister gardens
    Sculpture in the cloister gardens
    by Airpunk
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    Chester Cathedral

    by Airpunk Written Jan 13, 2014

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    Chester is not among the big Cathedral cities of Britain and the “Crap Towns” series even compares it to “your average parish church”. Maybe that was the reason why I was surprised to find such a large and fine red brick Cathedral here in Chester.
    The building's history leads to the establishment of a Benedictine Abbey in 1093, but there have been places of worship long before on this spot, dating even back to Roman times. In 1541, the Abbey was dissolved but the Abbey Church was turned into a Cathedral. The last Abbot became the first Dean. The Cathedral is almost entirely Gothic with some Romanesque and Renaissance exceptions. When the building was refurbished in the 19th century, Neogothic was the fashion of time which enforced the Gothic appearance of the building. The bells were moved out to a separate new tower in 1975. Unfortunately that tower was built in 1970s style, but is the first campanile (freestanding belltower) built in Britain after the reformation.
    Inside, there an ecclesiastical court room as well as some fine wooden carvings and mosaics. A Shrine of St. Werburgh to whom the Abbey church was dedicated, is found here. The cloister has some nice stained glass windows added during the 19th century restoration. The sculpture in its middle is called Water of Life and is suppose to depict a biblical seen. To me, it looks rather like a pair Siamese twin mermaids.

    There is a donation suggested, though not compulsory. The café has a good choice and is located in a former chapel.

    Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral Former cloister of the monastery Sculpture in the cloister gardens
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    Cathedral

    by mickeyboy07 Written Aug 29, 2011

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    The full name of Chester Cathedral is'The church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary',since 1541 it has been the centre of worship in Chester.The Cathedral and Monastic buildings were restored in the 19th century and a free standing bell tower was added in the 20th century.
    The cathedral is the north West's most visited tourist attraction.opening times for tours are mon to sat-9am till 5pm
    sun 1pm till 4pm
    There is also a shop for souvenirs and guidebooks.

    Chester Cathedral Bell Tower Garden of Rememberance Tomb Tower
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    In use since the 10th Century

    by gordonilla Written Jan 30, 2011

    This was a must see experience when in Chester. The Cathedral, or at least it's location, has been a focus of worship and attention since the 10th century. At that time a church was present dedicated to St Werburgh, who was born in the 7th century.

    The cathedral has grown and developed through adversity and change within the social and religious infrastructure of the region and country.

    It is a cathedral worth visiting; inside there are many smaller chapels and places of solitude. It is a living and breathing location - daily worship, visitors and links with other religious communities as far away as the Solomon Islands and North West Russia.

    Exterior The Addelshaw Tower (Bell Tower) Interior (1) Interior (2) (organ and organist) Interior (3)

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    Visit the Cathedral

    by Myfanwe Updated Jan 3, 2011

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    The present Cathedral stands on the sit of a 10th century Anglo saxon minster dedicated to St Werburgh by Aethelfleda. In 1092 the first Norman Earl of Chester, Hugh d'Avranches decided to transfor the minster into a Benedictine Abbey and then began the slow process of constructing the Abbey Church and at the same time the monastic quarters were rebuilt in a much more elegant gothic style. In 1540 the Abbey was barely finished when Henry VIII dissolved the monastery. However in 1541 the King returned the Church as the Cathedral of the new diocese of Chester.

    By the end of the 18th Century, the Cathedral was in need of repair but restoration did not start until the middle of the 19th Century. Today you can see some great architectural features, including remains of the medieval abbey. The fantastic carvings of the Quire are not to be missed. They are said to be amongst the finest medieval carvings in Britain today. Look out for the carvings of the Old man of Chester and the Elephant with a horses body - these can be found on the end of the beautifully carved pews.

    There is an admission fee of £5.00 to go into the Cathedral Mon - Sat. Admission is free on Sundays with an optional donation.

    Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral The Quire at Chester Cathedral
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    Chester Cathedral

    by grayfo Written May 6, 2010

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    Chester Cathedral stands on the site of a seventh century Saxon Church that was dedicated to St. Werburgh, although the site itself may have been used for Christian worship since Roman times.

    In 1092 Hugh Lupus (Hugh the Wolf) founded the Benedictine Abbey, and a new Norman style church was built of which parts of which can still be seen today.

    The Church was rebuilt from around 1250 onwards taking 250 years to complete. Due to the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII, the Abbey was closed in 1541, but the following year became the Cathedral of the newly-created Diocese of Chester.

    Monday to Saturday: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm
    Sunday: 1.00 pm to 4.00 pm

    Adult - £5.00
    Child 16 & Under - £2.50

    email office@chestercathedral.com

    March 2010

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    Cathedral Bell Tower and Cathedral Green

    by Balam Written Apr 27, 2010

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    The Bell tower of Chester Cathedral is not atatched to the Cathedral building but is in the grounds called Cathedral Green, It's a great place to sit if you want some peace and quiet.
    The Cheshire Regiments garden of remembrance is here.

    Bell Tower Cathedral Bell Tower Cathedral Gardens
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    Chester Cathedral

    by Balam Written Apr 20, 2010

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    Chester Cathedral is probably one of the main tourist attractions in Chester but the quite hefty admission charge of £5 certainly puts a lot of people off and it put us off. i really do object to paying to go in to a Church especially such a large amount.

    Open:
    Monday – Cathedral Saturday 9.00 am – 5.00 pm. Shop 9.30 am – 5.00 pm. Refectory 9.30 am – 4.30pm
    Sunday Cathedral 1.00 pm – 4.00 pm. Shop 11.00 am – 4.00 pm. Refectory CLOSED

    Admission Charges are:
    Adults £5.00 per person Senior Citizens £4.00 per person
    Children (under 16) £2.50 per person Families - up to 3 children FREE with a paying adult
    Students £4.00 per person Unwaged £4.00 per person
    Charisma Card - free admission for cardholder only
    Groups (10 or more) £4.00 adult - £2.00 children under 16

    Regular Services
    WEEKDAYS (Monday - Friday)
    07.30 - Morning Prayer in the Chapel of St Anselm
    17.30 - Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: Choral Evensong in the Quire
    Wednesday:Said Evening Prayer in the Lady Chapel

    SATURDAYS
    09.00 - Morning Prayer
    09:30 - Holy Communion
    16:15 - Choral Evensong

    SUNDAYS
    08.00 - Holy Communion in the Quire (Book of Common Prayer)
    10.00 - The Cathedral Eucharist in the Nave
    11.30 - Mattins in the Quire (BCP Eucharist 3rd and 5th Sundays)
    15.30 - Choral Evensong in the Quire
    18.30 - Evening Service in the Nave on the 1st & 5th Sundays in the month

    HOLY COMMUNION
    12.30 - Monday in the Chapel of St. Werburgh
    12.30 - Tuesday in the Nave
    12.30 - Wednesday in the Nave
    11.30 - Thursday in the Lady Chapel (Book of Common Prayer)
    12.30 - Friday in the Chapel of St Erasmus
    09.30 - Saturday in the Chapel of St Werburgh

    Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral Chester Cathedral
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    The Water of Life

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    Stephen Broadbent's bronze sculpture, the Water of Life, in Chester Cathedral cloister garden, is one of the most beautiful in the world. It was completed in 1994 and is 3.3m high. It depicts the encounter between Jesus and the woman of Samaria, as told in John's gospel.

    " Jesus said, ' The water that I shall give will be an inner spring always welling up for eternal life.'" John 4:14

    The Water of Life The Water of Life The Water of Life
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    Very Interesting

    by stevemt Written Apr 29, 2007

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    Chester Cathredral is a wonderful place to visit.

    With records of a church on this site since the early tenth century, it was founded as a Benedictine Monastery dedicated to St Werburgh on 1092. In 1541, following the dissolution of the monasteries, it was rededicated as the Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary in Chester, the mother church of the Church of England Diocese of Chester.

    It has the only Consistory Court left in existance in Ehgland

    The Cathedral Floor Plan
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  • Rachael71's Profile Photo

    Chester Cathedral

    by Rachael71 Written Apr 17, 2007

    The 11th century Cathedral is just off the main shopping street and is one of the main attractions of Chester. If you're looking for a little peace, then just take ten minutes to sit in one of the gardens and watch the world go by, before heading inside to take in the architecture. The huge cost of maintaining the building means that it is no longer free of charge to enter, and the Diocese asks that you make a contribution if you visit (I believe the recommended sum is around £4).

    Look out for a fabulous quilt inside the cathedral that depicts the Chester Mystery Plays. It was made in the early 1990s by an American artist and is a true work of art and craftsmanship. It was stolen from the Cathedral a couple of years ago but fortunately was found and returned safely, and is now on view in a much more secure position for us all to enjoy.

    Visitors are welcome to join the services at the Cathedral. If you are able to spend Christmas in Chester then I can recommend the 12 lessons and carols on Christmas Eve - but get there early, because the building is packed to the rafters and you might not get in!

    Cathedral gardens
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  • iwys's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by iwys Updated Apr 1, 2007

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    The first church here was built in the 7th century. It is believed that it was built on the site of a Roman temple to Apollo and that even earlier than that, the Druids worshipped here.

    In 875 AD, the body of St. Werburgh was brought to Chester by nuns to protect it from the invading Danish army. Werburgh was an Anglo-Saxon princess, the daughter of the King of Mercia. She had died in 690 AD. The church was consequently dedicated to St. Werburgh in 907 by Aethelflaed, the daughter of Alfred the Great,

    In 1092, following the Norman conquest, St. Lupus transformed the church into a Benedictine abbey, built in Romanesque style. Henry VIII raised it to cathedral status in 1592. It is unusual because, unlike most English cathedrals which are built of limestone, it is built with red sandstone bricks.

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    Cathedral Bell Tower

    by bugalugs Written May 2, 2006

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    This bell tower was built in 1975 solely for the bells of the cathedral. The existing tower on the cathedral could no longer support the weight of the bells so this tower which I didnt like at all, was built. It doesnt seem in keeping with the church or the area, in fact I wondered what on earth it was at first!

    Bell tower Bell tower
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    Chester Cathedral

    by bugalugs Written May 2, 2006

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    The Cathedral was originally an abbey called St. Werburghs which was built in 1092. St Werburgh was a princess, when she died she was buried in Staffordshire but because of fighting with Danes her remains were brought to the cathedral, she became a nun and an abbess. She is associated with miracles of healing.

    This church was started in 1250 and apparently took over 250 years to actually complete, although much restoration has been done over the years.

    The church apparenrly receive no money from the Church of England and therefore now charge an entrance fee. Before this was introduced it was a case of a donation but it seems enough donations were not given.
    Opening times are:
    Monday - Saturday 9am - 5pm
    Sunday 1am - 5pm
    Adults £4, Senior Citizens £3
    Children 5 - 16 years £1.50
    Also apparently there is no charge if you are attending a church service.

    Chester Cathedral Cathedral
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    Chester Cathedral

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 29, 2006

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    Chester Cathedral stands on a spot with a long history, dating back to the Roman period. It is believed to the the site of an ancient pagan temple. In the 11th century, a monastery was built here. When King Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1539, it was incorporated into the cathedral. Work has continued on it ever since.

    Unlike most cathedrals, which stand alone, this one almost blends into its surroundings. It makes it seem much more approachable. However, it's very dark inside, making it difficult to shoot good photos.

    Chester Cathedral The main entrance to the Cathedral The Garden of Remembrance The Cathedral Close Chester Cathedral by night
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    Chester Cathedral

    by uglyscot Written Jun 8, 2005

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    The Cathedral was originally a benedictine Monastery, dedicated to St Werburgh. It seems from records that a church stood on the site since theearly 10th century. After the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a church for the Church of England.
    Admission to the cathedral is charged to visitors, but worshippers enter free. Evensong is at 17.30 from Monday -Friday.

    The refectory dates to the 13th century and catered for 40 monks and their visitors.
    It is open from 9.30-16.45 daily Mon-Sat, 12-16.00 on Sundays.

    The modern Creation Window shows the 6 days of creation.

    There is also a cathedral shop selling Cds, prints, china, spoons, jigsawa etc. Online : shop@chestercathedral.com

    Chester Cathedral
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