Walls of Chester, Chester

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  • Views from the walls
    Views from the walls
    by alancollins
  • Breakthrough spot close to Newgate
    Breakthrough spot close to Newgate
    by Airpunk
  • City Walls in the North
    City Walls in the North
    by Airpunk
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    Chester City Walls

    by Airpunk Written Jan 13, 2014

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    City Walls in the South
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    The city walls are not just the frame and fortifications for the city – they are one of their main attractions. The first city walls were built around 70AD and altered during the centuries according to the needs of their era. It was not until the civil war when they were put to an extensive test. For example, you can see the spot where the parlamentarians broke through close to Newgate. King Charles I. is said to have watched the defeat of his army from Phoenix Tower. Though the current city walls are a 18th century version adapted for tourist needs, many medieval parts have been preserved. They still follow the original line of the Roman Walls. The northern and eastern part are dotted with towers while the river was considered to be enough of a defence in the west and the south.
    You can walk for the whole length (around 2 miles) of the city on the walls or next to them. There are access points all the way long and the city walls are open 24/7. However, you may meet some less friendly citizens during the hours of darkness in the more isolated areas of the wall. Of course, the most popular point to access the walls are the steps at the Eastgate Clock.

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    Walls of Chester

    by alancollins Written Jun 28, 2012

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    Wall and Gatehouse
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    The roman walls of Chester have stood for almost 2000 years. Reinforced over the years to protect the city until their military purpose was no longer required. The walls were changed into a fashionable walkway during the 18 century and remain so today. The entire length of the wall is 2 miles and make an almost complete circuit of the city centre. There are a number of points to gain entry on to the wall. With a number of gates, now arches and places of interest on route, together with attractive views. It costs nothing to walk the walls and they are available 24/7.

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  • mickeyboy07's Profile Photo

    City Walls

    by mickeyboy07 Updated Sep 4, 2011

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    Near the Roman Gardens
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    Chester City Walls consist of a defensive structure built to protect the city from invading armies.The construction was started by the Romans when they established the Fortress of Diva Victrix between 70 and 80 AD.After the Norman conquest the walls were extended to the west and south to form a complete circuit of the medieval city,this was probably complete by the middle of the 12th century.Maintenance of the structure of the walls was an ongoing concern,they were heavily damaged during the Civil War,following this they ceased to have a defensive purpose and were developed for leisure and recreation.
    The walls are now a major tourist attraction and form an almost complete circuit of the former medieval city providing a walkway of about two miles.Upkeep and repair of the walls continues to be a problem.

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    King Charles Tower

    by gordonilla Written Feb 7, 2011
    King Charles Tower (1)
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    One of the towers around the Chester City Walls. This tower is located at the north east corner of the wall. It is believed that this is where King Charles I stood, and watched his army being defeated by Parliamentary troops during the Battle of Rowton Moor (24 September 1645).

    It has also been known as the Phoenix Tower and the Newton Tower.

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    Walking around the walls of Chester

    by gordonilla Written Feb 6, 2011
    Walls (1)
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    There are some 2 miles (just over 3 km) of unbroken city wall to explore. I was surprised by the experience, and although I did not do the full circuit in one walk, I did walk the full length of the walls.

    I understand that you can join a formal tour of the walls - I past several of these groups as I completed my solitary walk, enjoying the sights and views.

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    City Walls

    by Balam Written Apr 27, 2010

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    City Walls at The Castle
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    Chester has superb Walls and few places can boast of walls as Ancient and complete as these. They have an elavated walkway which lets you walk for 2 miles (3 km) right around the City where you can get some great views of the city. some of which you can only get from the walls.

    The Romans first built wooden walls and deep ditches to keep marauding local tribes before they built walls of stone. In the middle ages these became the foundations of the east and north sections that you can see today. The rest being a 12th century extension which took in Chester Castle while Medieval watch towers strengthened the fortifications.
    During the Civil war when Chester was besiged for 18 months by Parlimantarian troops King Charles I on one occasion stood on Phoenix Tower (now known as King Charles's Tower) watching his army being beaten at nearby Rowton Moor.

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    The City Walls

    by Myfanwe Written Apr 26, 2010

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    City Walls
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    The Sandstone walls of Chester provide a pleasant 2 mile walk, sometimes 39 feet above street level providing some great views of the City and the surrounding countryside. To the North and East they follow the line of the old Roman walls, traces of which can still be seen. The Southern walls, extended down to the river by the Saxons, were rebuilt by the Normans who added the Western walls to complete the circuit. By the 1500's the walls were dotted with watchtowers and heavily fortified and presented a formidable barrier which withstood cannon bombardment during the Civil war siege. The Medieval gates were later replaced by arches and the Walls breached to accomodate roads and railway. During our visit part of the wall was being repaired and restored to its' former glory.

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  • Walking the walls of Chester

    by alisonane Written Aug 12, 2009

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    Walking the walls of Chester takes a good hour. If you do not have that long try starting by the Eastgate Clock and head down to the river. As a local I would not recommend walking the walls in the dark

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    Kaleyards Gate

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    Kaleyards Gate
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    Kaleyards Gate is a 13th century postern that opened into the monks' vegetable gardens. In 1275 King Edward I allowed the monks of St Werburgh Abbey to breach the city walls, as long as the gate did not permit the entry of a man on horseback, so as to prevent attack. In a 700-year-old tradition, it is locked at 9pm every night to secure the city inside its walls.

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    King Charles Tower

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009
    King Charles Tower

    Formerly known as the Phoenix Tower, this is the tower from which King Charles I watched his cavalry defeated by the Parliamentarians at the Battle of Rowton Mooor in 1645.

    The Painters' Guild, which included the famous seventeenth century artist John Souch, used to meet in an upper room in the tower.

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    Watergate

    by iwys Updated Feb 10, 2009

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    Watergate
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    During the Middle Ages, when Chester was an imporatant port, the River Dee flowed close to this gate and all goods brought into the city passed through it and the gatekeeper charged tolls here. The original water gate was replaced by the current arch in 1788.

    Nowadays, it is a pedestrian bridge over the main east-west road into the city, Watergate Street. It also offers good views over Chester Racecourse.

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    Walk the Walls

    by Andrew_W_K Written Aug 6, 2008

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    Chester city walls
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    At just under 2 miles of mostly flat walkways the walls of Chester can be strolled easily in just over 30 minutes. From the walls you can see some of Chester's Roman remains, the cathedral, the watch towers, the racecourse, the river Dee and the castle. Being close to the city centre you can opt to do the walls in sections if you like while stopping for a coffee or other sights. My favourite section is along the north west stretch where there are excellent views of the Welsh mountains in the background.

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    City walls.

    by wandabendik Written Jul 22, 2007

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    City walls.
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    Go for a walk around the city on the roman walls. This is 13/4 miles and is approx 1hour to walk. You can exit at certain points of the tour.
    Along the way you will see lots of plaques, these explain where you are, which direction to find the next plaque, the areas history, and what happened there.

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    Bridgegate

    by iwys Written Oct 13, 2006

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    The present arch replaced a medieval bridge in 1782.It waas originally built as a fortified structure to protect the Old Dee Bridge. In the 1649s it played a key role in the siege of Chester by the Parliamentarian army.

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    Bonewaldesthornes' Tower

    by iwys Updated Oct 13, 2006

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    Bonewaldeshtornes' Tower is a sandstone water tower, built in 1325. In mediaeval times the River Dee flowed around its base. But, over the centuries the river has silted up at this point and changed its course.

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