Fun things to do in Cheshire

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    Views from the walls
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  • Rows
    Rows
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  • Former cloister of the monastery
    Former cloister of the monastery
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Cheshire

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    Lyme Park - Tudor Facade

    by stevezero Written Aug 1, 2006

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    On one side Lyme Park has its original Tudor Facade. To the right you can see where the Italianate structure was grafted on (photo 3)
    The is an old clock on the front (not working) nad you can see the mechanism from inside the house.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Lyme Park

    by stevezero Written Aug 1, 2006

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    Lyme Park is a magnificent stately home, near Stockport, not far from Manchester. It is essentially a Tudor home which was transformed into an Italianate palace in the 18th century. Not much of the Tudor exterior remains, but inside there are still a lot of Tudor features, such as the lavish ceilings nad the long gallery.
    Unfortunately, when we visited the house was undergoing emergency work and half the house was shrouded in scaffold. Still it should be completed this year.

    In the care of National Trust.
    Admission charge - Adults £6.50

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    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Little Moreton Hall - Moat

    by stevezero Written Jul 31, 2006

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    The hall was and still is a moated manor house. In the rectangular well preserved moat, the gentle rippling of the waters reflects and enhances the distorted shape of the timberwork adding to the overall magic of the scene. The ducks and fish are oblivious of the tourists' fascination as they swim in the moat that encloses both building and gardens. The water in the moat is not stagnant but is linked to a flowing stream that ensures a renewed supply.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

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    Little Moreton Hall - Inscription

    by stevezero Written Jul 31, 2006

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    Above one of the windows of the hall is a nice inscription, left by a Tudor carpenter (click on for more detail) In these days the English language was very much written as it was spoken. An early trade advert maybe?

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Little Moreton Hall

    by stevezero Written Jul 31, 2006

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    Little Moreton Hall is one of the best preserved Tudor timber framed buildings in England. It has been little altered in the last 500 years. It has however become very warped over time and there is hardly a straight line to ne seen anywhere on the building. It still has its long gallery, with some important paintings.

    National Trust property
    Admission Charge - Adults £5.50

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    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    Jodrell Bank Obsevatory

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 21, 2005

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    Right in the heart of the Cheshire countryside, some 20 miles south of Manchester is this huge telescope. Its part of the University of Manchester instruments. The Lovell Telescope, with an altazimuth-mounted parabolic dish 250 ft (76 m) in diameter, is one of the world’s largest fully steerable radio antennas. University research programs include studies of galactic structure, angular sizes and structure of radio sources, polarization of radio sources, quasars, pulsars, molecules in interstellar space, and lunar radar. It is part of the MERLIN array (Multi-Element-Radio-Linked-Interferometer) that includes other radio telescopes throughout England. The site is currenly under re-developed programme so admission prices (£1.50 in Nov 2005) are low. There is new observation path opened so you can get great close up views.
    Also in the visitors centre is a small 3D theatre where simulated trips to Mars can be taken in a matter of 10 minutes instead of the normal 3 months! The landscape of Mars was awesome - a huge canyon to rival that of the Grand Canyon. Couldn't breathe the air though! The guide was really amusing as he explained about the stars in the solar system - he looked like a typical mad professor, but was quite charming!

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    • Museum Visits

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    Blue Planet Aqauarium

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 20, 2005

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    Not too far from the boat museum is another - the Blue Planet Aquarium, the UK's largest aquarium attraction, with two floors of interactive displays, one of Europe's largest collections of sharks and an underwater walkway tunnel. So if its raining this is a great idea for an hour or two. Again more pics and info I absolutely loved the seahorses - such beautiful creatures.

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    Cheshire Cat

    by sandysmith Written Nov 20, 2005

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    Ok who's knows the expression, "Grining like a Cheshire Cat". Well you may think this originated from Daresbury but in fact it is believed to have originated at Grappenhall another cheshire village some 3 miles away. The original cheshire cat is purported to be a carving of the said grinning cat on the church tower - well its not too visible - you need good eyesight or a good zoom lens and have to know where to look! All I could see where some crumbling gargoyles around the church tower.

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    Boat Museum Ellesmere Port

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 20, 2005

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    This unique award winning canal museum has the world's largest floating collection of inland waterways craft. The site covers over 7 acres of the historic canal port and dock buildings. Its a great trip out for half a day and easily combined with great shopping at the nearby outlet village - so something for everyone. More pics and info here

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    Beeston

    by sandysmith Written Nov 20, 2005

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    Just 20 minutes from the lovely walled town of Chester is the rural community of Beeston.
    There are ruins of an old castle with sweeping views across the Cheshire plains and the opportunity of seeing rural life in action. A dairy ice-cream farm and a candle workshop factory are two popular attractions set admist the south Cheshire rural countryside. Much more about this on my Beeston page.

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    Anderton Boat Lift

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 20, 2005

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    The Anderton Boat Lift, not far from Northwich in Cheshire, was built in 1875. It was the first of its kind in the world to aid navigation between canals of differing heights - the Trent and Mersey Canal with the River Weaver which have a height difference of 50 feet. It uses two counterbalanced tanks of water. One goes up while the other goes down. Movement is vertical, like an elevator. It laid in disrepair and neglect for many years but was restored in MArch 2002 and is now a major tourist attraction in the area. Its aptly coined the "Cathedral of the Canals".

    Trips can be made in the lift in a glass-topped boat - bit pricey at £6.50 I think and can be combined with a river trip into Northwich and back for another £3.75. Alternatively to view the lift and the excellent exhibition area its just £2.00 per adult - our choice.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Anderton Mini Maze

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 20, 2005

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    Two tonne weights, originally part of the 1908 Anderton Lift make up this fun mini-maze - so even the kids are catered for here.Each weight is over two tonnes - a total of over 500 tonnes in the maze - excluding me! Thats over 50 double decker buses

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    The Anderton Boat Lift and Nature Park

    by anderschwan Written Oct 29, 2005

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    The Anderton Boat Lift is a marvel. It's been totally restored and is a working boat lift. The exhibits are interesting, and it is fun (really) to take a ride on it. The guide is wonderful and the experience made me want to take a river cruise down the Mersey.

    There is an adjoining Nature Park that has all kinds of gentle trails and is very well done. Great for a family trip!

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    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    St Oswalds Church

    by carlrea Written Jan 5, 2005

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    If you happen to take a peek at my Restaurant tip on my Cheshire page you will notice The Bells Of Peover.
    Well after your drink why not go over to St Oswalds which is directly opposite The pub.

    it is a spectacular and important timber church with a stone W tower, said to be of 1582 (see Pevsner) but probably earlier. The aisled nave (13th-14thc.) is of four bays, and the slightly lower chancel of two, all timber work with box pews. The nave aisles continue alongside the chancel, the N aisle dating from 1624 and the S from c.1610. They now house an organ loft and vestry to the N and the Shakerley Chapel to the S. The three vessels have separate roofs, built by Salvin in his restoration of 1852, but originally the nave and its aisles shared a single roof. The church was founded in 1269, hence none of the fabric is 12thc. What is at issue is the font, said to have been brought from Norton Priory in 1322.

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    Arley Hall and Gardens

    by sandysmith Updated May 6, 2008

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    A Jacobean House and beautiful gardens are waiting to be explored not far from Great Budworth. Colourful at all times of the year but springtime the bluebells are in their prime.

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Cheshire Hotels

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Cheshire Things to Do

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