Wilmslow Things to Do

  • Apprentice House
    Apprentice House
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  • Outbuildings at the Apprentice House
    Outbuildings at the Apprentice House
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  • Vegetable plots of the Apprentice House
    Vegetable plots of the Apprentice House
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Most Recent Things to Do in Wilmslow

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    Where the celebrities live

    by deeper_blue Written Nov 11, 2012

    Wilmslow and the surrounding area has a high proportion of millionaires living here. From Premier League footballers to businessmen to household names in the celebrity world. Walking around you can see why as the neighbourhood is very well to do. Even posher is Alderley Edge 2 miles south.

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    Quarry Bank Mill

    by Myfanwe Updated Apr 26, 2012

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    Quarry Bank Mill
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    Quarry Bank mill was founded by Samuel Greg in 1784, the mill continued in commercial production until 1959. It lies in the village of Styal near Wilmslow, Cheshire and is now cared for and maintained by the National Trust. It is one of the best preserved textile mills of the Industrial Revolution. As you walk around the Mill you can see demonstrations of the first spinning wheels such as the spinning jenny all the way through the ages to the deafening mechanical machines. There are lots of information boards and hands on exhibitions which help you understand the workings of a cotton mill. It really is worth a visit, in addition to the cotton mill you can visit the Apprentice house, explore the grounds and gardens and visit the village of Styal. See other tips for details.

    Check out the website below for up to date opening times and admission prices.

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    The Gardens at Quarry Bank Mill

    by Myfanwe Written Apr 19, 2012

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    Gardens at Quarry Bank Mill
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    The Gardens at Quarry Bank mill are a joy to explore. There are many species of trees and flowers which provide a coulourful display during the gardening year. An interesting feature to explore is a cave, carved out of the soft red sandstone, situated above the garden. This is an excellent spot for a picnic right beside the river.

    A joint ticked for Quarry Bank Mill, Apprentice House and gardens can be obtained from the ticket office opposite the mill.

    Check the website below for up to date opening times and admission prices.

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    Styal Village

    by Myfanwe Written Apr 19, 2012

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    Styal
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    Styal Village was created by Samuel Greg of the nearby Quarry Bank Mill as a complete village for the mill workers. Situated in picturesque countryside, it is just a ten minutes walk away from the mill. We took a wander around the Village, it was like taking a step back in time. We found rows and rows of picturesque red-brick cottages, village shop, pretty little Church and of course a nice little pub.

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    The Apprentic House at Quarry Bank Mill

    by Myfanwe Written Apr 19, 2012

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    Apprentice House
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    The Apprentice house is situated just a few minutes walk away from Quarry Bank Mill. It is here the pauper children who worked at the mill were housed. The Children were educated, fed and slept here after some gruelling shifts at the mill. The National Trust guide will take you around the house sharing some fascinating facts about the conditions in the Apprentice House. I really enjoyed my visit here & would highly recommend it.

    See website below for up to date admission fees and opening times.

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    Apprentice House, (Quarry Bank Mill, Styal)

    by Balam Updated Apr 26, 2011

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    Apprentice House
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    When we visited Quarry Banl mill we had a tour of the Apprentice House which housed the pauper children who worked in the mill. These were Children who had come from the workhouses and at Quarry Bank Mill they were really well looked after unlike many other mills of the time. That does not mean that life was not hard, The Children would work for 12 hours in the Mill and then have evening work at the house to do but they were clothed, had beds to sleep in (2 to a bed) and coluld eat as much as they wanted. The Gregs (Mill owners) employed doctors to treat the children if they were ill and they had a change of clothes every Sunday.
    We were taken around the house by a guide in period dress who told us a great deal about the Children and how they lived.

    Gift Aid Admission (Standard Admission prices in brackets)
    Mill only: adult £8 (£7.25), child £4 (£3.60), family £20 (£18.10).
    Mill and Apprentice House or Mill and garden: adult £11.50 (£10.40), child £5.75 (£5.20), family £28.75 (£26).
    Mill, Apprentice House and garden: adult £14 (£12.70), child £7 (£6.35), family £35 (£31.75).
    Estate: (Standard Admission) Cars £4, motorcycles £2, coaches £15. Free upgrade when travelling by public transport or bicycle

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    Quarry Bank Mill (Styal)

    by Balam Updated Apr 26, 2011

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    Quarry Bank Mill
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    Founded by Samuel Greg in 1784 Quarry Bank Mill is one of the best preserved textile mills from the Industrial Revolution and is now a fantastic working museum for the cotton industry.
    You can see very interesting demonstrations on how cotton was processed into cloth and see how water powered the mill and then how it was supplemented by steam power.

    We had a great time wondering around the Mill looking at the machinrs and watching the demonstrations.The water Wheel is massive and really interesting, there are some great models that let you control the flow of water to see how Water Wheels work and how water power is mannaged. After we had a good play with those and got a bit wet we had a walk around the Gardens and over to the Village of Styal that was built to house the workers of the Cotton Mlll.

    Prices 2011

    Gift Aid Admission (Standard Admission prices in brackets)
    Mill only: adult £8 (£7.25), child £4 (£3.60), family £20 (£18.10).
    Mill and Apprentice House or Mill and garden: adult £11.50 (£10.40), child £5.75 (£5.20), family £28.75 (£26). Mill,
    Apprentice House and garden: adult £14 (£12.70), child £7 (£6.35), family £35 (£31.75).
    Estate: (Standard Admission) Cars £4, motorcycles £2, coaches £15. Free upgrade when travelling by public transport or bicycle

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    Quarry Bank Mill, Gardens and Styal Estate

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Quarry Bank Mill
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    Visiting this National Trust attraction is highly recommended. This industrial heritage site has a mill by the River Bollin and the cotton mill was discovered by the Gregg family in the 18th Century and was in operation until the mid 20th Century. The mill features Europe's most powerful working waterwheel and its impressive machinery. At the mill you can learn about the cotton industry from traditional spinning and weaving to how cotton was made into cloth. It's worth prebooking onto a guided tour of the Apprentice House and garden where you can learn how hard life was for the children working at the factory.

    I enjoyed looking round the Quarry Bank House Garden and if you have more time do explore the surrounding woodlands and countryside plus include a trip to Styal village where the factory workers lived (I didn't get chance to visit as I ran out of time).

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    A lovely walk through the Styal National Trust

    by deebum25 Written Sep 27, 2008

    In England they have absolutely beautiful parks where you can take your dog for a good run and this is one of them. The walks are well maintained and well populated even in the middle of the morning when we took a walk! It took us about an hour to get to Quarry Mill in Styal and then we headed back home. Wonderful greenery and fresh air.

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    Norcliffe Chapel

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 8, 2003

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    Norcliffe Chapel

    This chapel was built by Samuel Greg in 1823. The mill workers could it seems chose their own minister and it was at first baptist, but later it became a Unitarian and is still that today.

    The porch was added by Robert Hyde Greg when the church was renovated in 1867.

    There are not many times when the church is actually open to view, but I think it is open on Sunday afternoons.

    It is a popular place today for weddings, and has to be booked well in advance.

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    The Village School

    by bugalugs Written Apr 8, 2003

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    Village School

    The school opened in 1823. Younger children were taught here during the day and the older children, who were then working in the mill, would be taught here in the evenings.

    In 1844 new laws were introduced whereby children under 13 years of age could only for for 6.1/2 hours per day and then they had 3 hours of school.

    It is still the village primary school.

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    Oak Cottages

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 8, 2003

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    Oak Cottages

    These cottages were built around 1820 for the mill workers by Samuel Greg. They paid rent for them, they have two rooms on the ground floor and two upstairs. As there are steps up to the front door, there are also steps down to a basement, and apparently these were sometimes 'let' separately to a different family.

    In front of the houses are there gardens, which were more than likely used to grow vegetables.

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    The Apprentice House

    by bugalugs Updated Apr 7, 2003

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    The Apprentice House

    The Apprentice House was built in 1788 to house mainly orphans or the children from families too poor to look after them themselves, or children who had been in the 'workhouses'.

    In the museum you can see the lists of names of children who lived and worked there. The wages they received, and whether or not they were treated for any illnesses by the doctor.

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    The Mill

    by bugalugs Written Apr 7, 2003

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    On the mill tour you can see the weaving shed, cotton processing, the power gallery, how the water wheel works, and much more.

    The Mill
    Open 1st April - 30 September
    Daily 10.30am - 5.30pm
    October - March
    Tuesday - Sunday
    10.30-5pm

    The Apprentice House and Garden:
    1st April - 30th September
    Tuesday to Friday
    2 - 4.30pm
    Saturday, Sunday and School Holidays
    11am - 4.30pm

    Prices:
    Mill and Apprentice House
    Adult £7.00
    Child £3.80
    Family £17.00

    Mill only:
    Adult £5.00
    Child £3.50
    Family £14.50
    Children under 5yrs free

    The Mill is owned by the National Trust and if you are a member then entry is free.

    If you were visiting thr UK for a couple of weeks and were intending to visit a few National Trust Properties then it maybe worth while to actually join. The membership is for a year but with the annual fee being around £50.00 for a couple, if you were planning to visit a few of their sites it may save you some money.

    You dont have to join before you come, you can join at any National Trust Property, that would then entitle you to enter that same day with your membership.

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    Styal Village

    by Balam Written Apr 26, 2011

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    Styal Village
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    Built for the workers of the cotton mill Styal is a lovely little village that is well worth a look if your in the area. We walked around and then had lunch in the local pub 'The Ship Inn'

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Wilmslow Things to Do

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