Middlesbrough Things to Do

  • Transporter Bridge Visitors Centre
    Transporter Bridge Visitors Centre
    by spidermiss
  • The Winding House, Transporter Bridge
    The Winding House, Transporter Bridge
    by spidermiss
  • Machinery to pull gondola across the River Tees
    Machinery to pull gondola across the...
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Things to Do in Middlesbrough

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    Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 22, 2012
    The Transporter Bridge, Middlesbrough
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    We paid a visit to Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge. We had a two minute river crossing on the bridge's 'gondola' which began on the Middlesbrough side of the River Tees to Port Clarence's side. The bridge fully operational most of the day and carries vehicles and passengers across the river every 15 min. It can carry up to approximately 300 passengers and 200 cars a day. We had an opportunity to look out to the river and taking in the maritime and industrial life by its shores.

    The Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge is the largest of its kind in the world. The bridge was opened in 1911 to replace the ferry service between Middlesbrough and Ports Clarence which had operated since 1830. The Transporter Bridge is only one of three bridges that still remain in Britain. It was built by a sub contractor who built the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The gondola which holds passengers and vehicles are suspended by cables and runs on a wheel and rail system.

    It is considered an important asset to Middlesbrough and was awarded the Institution of Mechanical Engineer's highest honour in 1993. The historical landmark had become listed in 1985 and since 1993 it is lighted by flood lights which are operated in winter. The bridge had become famous for the British TV show, 'Auf Wiedersehen Pet' and local residents panicked that the bridge was going to be dismantled and sent to the US (as shown in the one of the programmes).

    After we visited the Transporter Bridge we paid a visit to its Visitor Centre (please click onto the link) where we learnt more about the bridge and Middlesbrough itself including its industrial and social past.

    It cost me 0.70 gbp (July 2012) for a round trip on the gondola. The bridge is opened daily but check the website for up to date information especially if work on the bridge is planned and incase of inclement weather.

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    Transporter Bridge Visitors Centre

    by spidermiss Updated Jul 22, 2012
    Transporter Bridge Visitors Centre
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    After having a ride across the River Tess on the Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge we had a look round The Visitors Centre which was opened in 2000 by Fred Dibnah.

    The Visitors Centre has a small exhibition about the bridge including The Grand Opening of the Bridge where social dignitaries from civic and industrial services were invited. It was opened by HRH Prince Arthur. The bridge celebrated its centenary in 2011.

    We had very friendly guides who were more than happy to share their knowledge and information about the bridge and area. Not only one the guides gave free souvenirs (a pencil and eraser) to my niece we also, to my Dad's delight, got to visit The Winding House where the bridge is operated from. We learnt at The Winding House the bridge's gondola is pulled by two cables (electrically operated) at 45 miles an hour.

    In all a worthwhile and enjoyable visit to both Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge and the Visitors Centre.

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    • Museum Visits
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  • Stewart Park

    by jduck1979 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    It's been a while since I've been there (probably 1991 when my Mum was still allowed to drive), but Stewart Park in the Marton area of Middlesbrough has long been one of the best places to visit in the area.

    One of the favourite things I remember about it is the pets corner (I guess a sort of Miniature zoo is the best description)..... and it appears it's still there, judging by the entry for the place in Wikipedia, and aerial views on GOOGLE MAPS.

    The park also contains the spot where the cottage famous explorer Captain James Cook was born used to be.... the cottage is no longer there (I think it got moved to a park in Melbourne, Australia) but the location is apparently marked by a granite urn.
    The Park also contains the CAPTAIN COOK BIRTHPLACE Museum... which I'll maybe add in a later tip if I get round to making a follow-up visit to the area.... for now check out: http://www.captcook-ne.co.uk/

    For the Wikipedia article, here's the URL:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stewart_Park_Middlesbrough

    And if you're in the Middlesbrough area, it's definately one of the things you should go see.... especially if you've got kids.

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    • Zoo
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    Wynyard Woodland Park

    by cheekymarieh Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    (formerly known as Castle Eden Walkway Country Park)

    There are miles of circular footpaths around a disused railway line. The visitor’s centre is housed in the old railway station with displays about woodland history and wildlife. On Friday evenings (weather permitting) you can star gaze from the observatory.

    The visitors centre is open from 9am to 4.30pm.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    The village of Great Ayton -...

    by cheekymarieh Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Roseberry Topping

    The village of Great Ayton is located in the North Yorkshire Moors National Park about 10 miles from Middlesbrough.

    The main claim to fame is that the famous explorer Captain Cook was brought up in the village. You will find reminders of his existence throughout the village - from the statue in the centre of the village to the monument a few miles out of the centre perched high on the Moor.

    Within the village it is well worth sampling the ice cream on sale at Suggits (it is delicious!) or try some of the real ales at one of the local hostelries.

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    • Beer Tasting

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    Norton

    by cheekymarieh Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Norton Duckpond

    This village has a unique character. There are many 18th and 19th century houses and shops around the Georgian High Street. This is one of several conservation areas within Stockton. It has a picturesque pond overlooked by the Saxon 11th century St Mary’s Church.

    The village was originally established in Anglo Saxon times and there is an ancient pagan burial ground dating back to those times.

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    Teesaurus Park

    by Airpunk Written Nov 28, 2008
    Triceratops
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    This park is located northwest to St. Hilda in an industrial area. It is nothing really beautiful, far away from civilization and with a view on even more industrial areas on the other side of the Tees river. This view, on the other hand, gives you an idea what the city is about and what made Middlesbrough grow.
    The park’s main attraction are metal dinosaur sculptures which were designed by steelwork apprentices. The whole thing is nice to see if you are nearby or like to take a walk through an industrial area. However, it is far away from a must-see.

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    St. Hilda's – historic buildings

    by Airpunk Written Nov 20, 2008
    The Old Town Hall in St. Hilda's
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    Middlesbrough’s first town hall from 1846 is still standing here. Quickly, it became too small and the present building at Albert Road replaced it in 1889. Used in the following decades for several purposes, it is now abandoned giving a sad idea of its former glorious day when it was the center of a flourishing town.

    The Custom House from 1835 has served different functions and was in use until a couple of years ago. Like the old town hall, it is now closed with its windows plugged – and has also become a victim of avndalism.

    As redevelopment plans are going on and the Middlehaven project is taking shape, efforts are made and funds raised to preserve these two buildings. Unfortunately, nothing specific has turned out and the future of the two buildings is still insecure.

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    St. Hilda's

    by Airpunk Written Nov 20, 2008
    Old Street signs in St. Hilda's
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    St. Hilda's is the part between the train Station and the transporter bridge and formed the heart of the town for many decades. It is the birthplace of Middlesbrough, the area which has been inhabited before the industrial revolution. A church was mentioned already in the 7th century. However, it is only little more than a ghost town today. Some houses are still inhabited, including those who look to be built in the 1970s. With most of the city life going on south of the railway line, houses in St. Hilda'sare difficult to let. Many of them were already pulled down and the whole area is subject to city redevelopment plans. Although St. Hilda's' remaining inhabitants are fighting for their homes, it has become a focus point in crime and vandalism.
    Walking through today’s St. Hilda's is a sad thing. Two of the historic buildings, the old town hall and the custom house, are still standing and described in a separate tip. For further information and more St. Hilda's pictures, I would like to recommend the flickr page below (which is not from me).

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    Town Hall

    by Airpunk Written Nov 14, 2008
    The new Town Hall

    The new town hall, built just some decades after the old town hall, is an impressive building and stilll one of the largest in the town center. It was designed by George Gordon Hoskins and built between 1883 and 1887. The tourist information office (not open on Sundays…) is also located there.

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    Dorman Museum

    by Airpunk Written Nov 14, 2008
    Dorman Museum
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    The Dorman Museum is the museum of local history and natural history of Middlesbrough. It shows a collection of local items and display’s the history of Middlesbrough. The former main collection, a huge number of victorian stuffed birds, eggs and insects, is now displayed in a large single room in the center. Other notable collections include coustumes as well as geological and ethnographical exhibits. Beside that, temporary exhibitions take place, for example one about medieval tools and machines.

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    History of Middlesbrough: Bolckow and Vaughan

    by Airpunk Written Nov 14, 2008
    Monument of Henry F. Bolckow
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    Henry Bolckow was an entrepreneur and is regarded as the father of Middlesbrough. Together with his friend John Vaughan, he invested in the iron and steel industry, creating structures in this area around which today’s Middlesbrough grew. Bolckow was elected as the first mayor and sponsored, among other things, a park and a new school from his money. Later, Bolckow was elected member of the parliament while Vaughan followed him as mayor.

    A bronze statue of Bolckoe stands on exchange square, close to the railway station. His former house, where Vaughan also lived, still stands at Cleveland Street. His grave (easy to guess – it’s close to Vaughan’s) can be visited at St. Cuthbert’s churchyard.

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    Albert Park

    by Airpunk Written Nov 14, 2008
    The park
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    Upon initiative of Middlesbrough’s first mayor, “People’s Park” was created in the mid-19th century. In 1868, it was opened to the public. Several sculptures found their way into the park, including a bronze sculpture of footballer Brain Clough and a sundial which is listed grade 2. Although the park waas inaugurated by Prince Albert himself, the name “Albert Park” was adapted later.

    When I was there, there was a kind of funfair going on in the park. No ferris wheel, but candies and stands selling small accesoires. It was unexpectedly full, compared to the rest of the town.

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    Spectra-txt

    by Airpunk Written Nov 13, 2008
    Me and Spectra txt
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    A kind of big interactive toy, right in the middle of the city. This modern sculpture glows in a different clour, if you text a message to a number shown on it. Nice idea, but I think that Middlesbrough needs to spend money on other things…

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    Bottle O' Notes

    by Airpunk Written Nov 13, 2008
    Bottle O' Notes - Middleborough's second landmark
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    Middlebrough’s most famous modern sculpture was designed by swedish-american artist Claes Oldenburg. It is related to the city’s most famous son, Captain James Cook, who was born in a village which is now part of Middlesbrough. The text fragments on the sculpture are excerpts from Cook’s diaries.

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Middlesbrough Things to Do

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