Penzance Restaurants

  • Marine ephemera
    Marine ephemera
    by leics
  • Catch of the day, chips and peas
    Catch of the day, chips and peas
    by leics
  • The little window seat
    The little window seat
    by leics

Best Rated Restaurants in Penzance

  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    The Admiral Benbow: The Smuggler on the roof

    by TheWanderingCamel Written Aug 7, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    The Admiral Benbow, locally known as "The Benbow" is a charming place serving good food at reasonable prices.

    It is in an old house (perhaps not quite as old as publicity has it!) and is popularly supposed to have been at one time a very run down public house, serving as head quarters for one of the local smuggling gangs. The figure on the roof (see the photo inside) which intrigues everybody, is supposed to commemorate a raid by "the Revenuers". The young man volunteered to climb on the roof and shoot at a nearby chimney "to distract them". Unfortunately the Revenue men shot first and he fell off the roof and was seriously injured, but was back in the bar a few months later!

    Today the "Wreck Bar" provides anything drinkable from "real ale" and cocktails to Coke and lemonade. This means that the Benbow is a good pub as well as a stylish restaurant!! At one time the house was owned by Roland Morris, a well known local wreck diver who recovered many significant treasures from wrecks in the area, particularly off the Isles of Scilly and a number of these remain in the Inn today.

    The Restaurant is in the cellar (called "The Great Cabin") and serves a variety of dishes, well cooked and served and accompanied by an excellent wine list.

    Sorry, I know this is also posted on the "Cornwall" page!

    Favorite Dish: The Benbow specialises in seafood (not unexpectedly, it's only a hundred yards from the harbour) but also offers just about everything.

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    The Turk's Head: Ancient building, good food.

    by leics Written Jan 7, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Exterior
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    The Turk's Head is one of the oldest pubs in Cornwall, with a secret passage to the harbour to assist in smuggling exploits and 'priests' holes' for hiding Catholic priests during anti-Catholic times. The pub is supposed to date back to 1233, when Penzance was invaded by Turks, and is said to be the first of its name in the UK.

    The existing building isn't that old, of course. Alterations over the centuries, including after a fire during the 1500s, mean that the building in which you sit and sup is not the original...but it is still pretty old, even so.

    And it is very much a comfortable, traditional pub, with lots of exposed beams, a real fire, low ceilings and snug nooks and corners in which to sit.

    Amazingly, the pub has had only 3 landlords over the past 100 years. That must make it pretty unique.

    I enjoyed my 'Doom' beer very much, and also enjoyed the sausage and mash, served with red onion 'marmalade' and port wine gravy. The sausages were excellent, which makes a change...English sausages can sometimes be poor quality.

    The pub serves food from 1200 to 1430 and from 1800 to 2130. I suspect, in high season, it is always packed out so booking would make sense then. But in early January there was no problem with getting a seat and it was a very pleasant place to eat.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel
    • Beer Tasting

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    The Admiral Benbow: Another ancient building, more good food.

    by leics Updated Jan 8, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Exterior
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    The Admiral Benbow is a short distance away from The Turk's Head, still on Chapel Street.

    It's an old building, originally cottages, and has an entirely unique interior, crammed with marine-related ephemera (quite a lot has, apparently, been discovered by local divers in the many local wrecks). There are two eating rooms upstairs (which I did not visit) but apparently they include cannon!

    I hadn't really intended to eat here, but the sight of a little empty table, tucked into the window and near the fire, appealed. You have to ask staff to 'seat you' but, fortunately, the courteous waitress seated me exactly where I wanted to sit.

    The beer...Doom again..was very good. Although the main eating areas were closed the menu had a good choice of dishes. I ordered 'catch of the day' (basically, fish and chips) and whatever white fish it was (I forgot to ask) was definitely very fresh indeed. The beer batter was light and crispy and the chips good too.

    I enjoyed my meal tucked away in the corner and found the staff very pleasant. But I imagine this place is heaving in the summer months, and I'm guessing you would almost certainly have to book in advance if you wanted to eat then.

    I didn't notice when I was actually in Penzance, but if you look at the photo, and to the right of the flag, you'll see a 'smuggler' perched on the pub roof, shotgun in hand!

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  • leics's Profile Photo

    Wetherspoons: Le Tremenheere: It's a chain, but it's ok.

    by leics Written Jan 8, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Le Tremeneere on a wet January night
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    There are J.D. Wetherspoon's pubs all over England. Their beer is good and reasonably-priced, and their food menus are also reasonably-priced (and edible). Although a chain, each pub is different (most were in existence as pubs before Wetherspoons took them over).

    A combination of tiredness, lack of money and rain meant I decided to eat in the Penzance Weatherspoon's (Le Tremenheere). It's in the Market Place, at the top of Market Jew Street, on the ground floor of a truly horrible late 60s concrete monstrosity.

    The interior is typical large-pub Wetherspoons (imo), with a large, subtly-lit open space and lots of tables. Every time I passed it was busy, so it is clearly the meeting-pub of choice for many Penzance folk.

    The menu is rather heavy on the steak/burger/chip side but also offers some salads, curry, pasta and jacket potato dishes.

    I had Doom beer again (perfectly ok) and ended up choosing the fishcakes. Unfortunately, there were no jacket potatoes available so the choice was chips or chips...and I don't usually eat chips more than once in a blue moon. The fishcakes were tasty and hot, the small side-salad acceptable. The chips would have been nicer if they'd been hot. But the meal was very reasonably-priced.

    So...a perfectly good place for a basic, reasonably-priced meal.

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  • psychocy's Profile Photo

    Penzance Cornish Pasty Co.: Eat Local - Pasties!

    by psychocy Updated Jan 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you get out to west Cornwall, you really, seriously, truly need to try a Cornish pasty. Held in the hand and eaten like a sandwich, they are convenient, delicious, and cheap. There are a multitude of unique fillings, shapes, and sizes with these 'supper baked in a pastry crust' goodies. It doesn't matter which one you get, just try them. I recommend the pasties from the Penzance Cornish Pasty Co. You can find the storefront right on Market Jew Street. Just ask if you have trouble finding it - any local will be able to direct you to it. Or you can just follow your nose to the delicious aroma.

    Favorite Dish: I loved the regular steak pasties. Lots of tender steak and yummy potatoes - like a beef stew inside a pie crust. Tracy was fond of the 'dessert' pasties with fruit fillings.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Budget Travel

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  • angelis's Profile Photo

    The Admiral Benbow: What's he looking for??

    by angelis Updated Mar 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    click pic to see the lookout

    The Admiral Benbow pub built in the 17th Century, on Chapel Street in Penzance is worth a look if only for the smugglers lookout who lies across its roof. It is also one of Penzance's oldest hosteleries and used to be the haunt of the infamous Benbow pirates.
    The food is your usual pub fare at pretty reasonable prices. There is a good choice of fish dishes and coffee and Cornish cream teas are also on the menu.
    The main bar, the Lady Hamilton, is upstairs and there is a good range of real ales to be had. There is also a games room and lounge bar.
    The landlord, Mick, has only been here a few years, and interestingly decided to decorate the interior with nautical bits and pieces. Some of the memoriabilia come from local wrecks.

    Children are welcome.
    Opening hours are;
    Mon-Sun 11am -3 pm and 6pm-11pm

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Historical Travel
    • Food and Dining

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  • aadil's Profile Photo

    The Field House: Famous For Cornish Pasties!!!

    by aadil Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    By the sea side, with a garden cafe as well as indoors for the rainy day!!! Lovely elegant style, a place with home made food and a very friendly atmosphere!!! Delicious food and excellent value for money!!!

    Favorite Dish: CORNISH PASTIES of course!!! And pastries and lovely Indian teas as well!!!

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  • janestewart's Profile Photo

    enys wartha: edwardian style

    by janestewart Written Sep 7, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    this place in Market Jew Street in Penzance is a fabulous place for good quality food and has been recommended by Rick Stein in the past. You certainly don't leave hungry and are spoilt for choice

    Favorite Dish: ploughmans is great, sandwiches are filling, all day breakfast cannot be beaten.

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    • Family Travel

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  • Admiral Benbow Pub: Pirates of Penzance Eat Here!

    by DaHussy Written Aug 5, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is Pub grub but a cut above with the additions of a great wine selection and fresh fish fixed simply. The days have been drizzly so crowds large but the wait staff fast. My salmon was done to perfection, great salad and fries thick, hot and tasty. Thought I would further test the menu with dessert...excellent summer berry tart with hot custard.Do not expect gourmet cuisine but a nicely prepared seafood, good service, good value.

    Favorite Dish: So far the salmon fillet. The table across from meal all had meat dishes that looked well prepared.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Bosun's Boatshed: Round the back of the Boatsheds

    by monkeyfeesh Written Aug 28, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Boatshed is a pleasant, informal place. The exterior is a combination of a wood-panelled facade and whitewashed stone. It occupies several floors: the ground floor is a wine/café bar; the middle floor a restaurant; the top floor a nightclub. Iniside it's quite a light and warm feeling place, with a nice combination of modern and old-fashioned furnishing. The menu is quite wide and includes plenty of fresh local seafood. The prices are quite reasonable; the majority of the wine is under £10 a bottle, and what we had was quite nice stuff. The food was tasty if unspectacular, and the portions of a decent size. The service was good, with staff always close at hand but never loitering with intent as sometimes happens. All in all it's a nice little place for a relaxed meal.

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  • leafmcgowan's Profile Photo

    Pirate Inn: The Pirate Inn

    by leafmcgowan Written Jun 30, 2010
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    More aesthetic on the outside than on the inside, this moderately sized restaurant lured me through its doorway. Not quite the pirate atmosphere as I was expecting ... i found a family restaurant with a friendly staff running around with sports/games on the television. Disenchanted that I wasn't greeted by pirates ... I took my seat for some grub - pleased by the food and the service. No credit cards accepted, strictly Great Britain Pounds only. Owned and operated by Jackie and Brendon Hichens, this restaurant is apparently a bit of a landmark for modern Penzance. They also have a large grassed area where families could dine outdoors and kids can play in the playground. The establishment is also dog friendly and also has wheel chair access. Most of the main dishes range from 7-15 GBP. Every second sunday they host a quiz night, thursdays for live music, folk night on tuesdays, and tv for sports. They brandish a pool table. They claim to have the best sunday roast in town and have the choice of 6 ales to choose from. My dish was average - nothing to brag about at home, but the service was grand. Rating: 2.7 stars out of 5.

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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  • Admiral Benbow Pub: Pirates of Penzance Eat Here!

    by DaHussy Written Aug 5, 2008

    This is Pub grub but a cut above with the additions of a great wine selection and fresh fish fixed simply. The days have been drizzly so crowds large but the wait staff fast. My salmon was done to perfection, great salad and fries thick, hot and tasty. Thought I would further test the menu with dessert...excellent summer berry tart with hot custard.Do not expect gourmet cuisine but a nicely prepared seafood, good service, good value.

    Favorite Dish: So far the salmon fillet. The table across from meal all had meat dishes that looked well prepared.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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Penzance Restaurants

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