Tintagel Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by ranger49
  • Things to Do
    by ranger49
  • Things to Do
    by ranger49

Most Recent Things to Do in Tintagel

  • Forget about the beach

    by jen23296 Updated Sep 8, 2010

    There are lots of really great things to do in Tintagel, but please don't think of it as a beach holiday destination. At low tide, a tiny strip of beach (more silt than sand) is exposed, not far from Tintagel Castle... and that's about it. This is a place of majestic cliffs and great clifftop walks, not somewhere to be sunning yourself. (Head to Newquay for that.)

    The photo shows a REALLY BAD piece of photoshop fakery that used to be seen on the Camelot Castle Hotel website... until complaints were made. It still turns up on search engines from time to time, but it's not real! There is effectively no beach anywhere near Camelot Castle Hotel. Don't be fooled.

    Really bad Photoshop
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    Visit the Castle

    by ranger49 Updated Oct 13, 2008

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    Remains of the Castle exist on both the "main" land and the promontory known as the "island". A pathway and steps lead up to the ticket office and onto the modern bridge which crosses the chasm between the two.

    It is a steep climb but if you pause for a rest not only will you see some magnificent coastal scenery (" look out for the caves and what we called the "Giant Claw") but also some interesting geological layers in the cliff wall as you make your way up to the Island Courtyard.

    The Ticket office sells an excellent 44-page illustrated guide to the Castle. The maps help you to obtain a clearer picture of the layout of the castle and the history content is concise but comprehensive. It is an English Heritage publication and costs £3.99 - well worth it as a guide and as a souvenir of your visit.

    Full Visitor facilities availalble - Toilets; cafe;shop; Exhibitions.

    Admission Details.
    Adult £4. 70
    Concession £3.80
    Child £2.40
    Under 5's free
    Free Admission - Members of English Heritage and CADW (the Welsh Heritage Org.)

    The Bridge to the Island Caves & the Entering the Island Courtyard. The Island Courtyard. The mainland courtyard from the Island

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    The Old Post Office

    by ranger49 Written Oct 11, 2008

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    This small medieval house dates from the 14th Century and is well worth a visit.
    It is maintained and looked after by the National Trust and there is usually a guide at hand to answer your questions.

    The rooms are furnished with the type of oak country furniture that would have been is use in rural cottage homes in Victorian times. But judging by the size and layout of the rooms it must have been the home of quite a well off family - originally a 14th Century yeoman farmer according to the Guide.

    From 1844 -1892 the house was used as a Letter Receiving Office for the district, dealing with incoming mail only. Now the former Post Room is shown as a Victorian Post Office would have looked and also has a small shop selling local guides, maps and souvenirs. Look out for pictures and posters on the walls.
    Each room in the house has an information leaflet - not to be taken away - nor is it allowed to take photgraphs inside the building.

    Do not miss the back garden which is delightful and gives you a good view of the slate construction of the building and its "Tumble roof".

    Admission Free to NT Members
    Adults £2.70
    Child £1.35
    Family £6.75
    Family (one adult) £4.05

    No parking on site - plenty nearby, all paying
    No Toilet facilities on site, nearest WC up the road in Trevena Square.

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    Tintagel Castle - Northern Ruins

    by illumina Updated Mar 2, 2008

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    These buildings were also uncovered in the 1930s excavations, and their date and purpose are still uncertain - some may well date similarly to the 5th or 6th centuries AD, while others may be medieval; one has a small oven for drying corn.

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    Tintagel Castle - Merlin's Cave and the Haven.

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    The sandy beach to the east of the bridge, known as the Haven, is where ships were once loaded. From this beach is it possible to access Merlin's Cave at low tide. A fault or a layer of weaker rocks close to sea level has been hollowed out by the action of the tide, and two tunnels run right through the Island that the castle is built on. The larger of the two is known as Merlin's Cave

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    Tintagel Castle

    by illumina Updated Jun 3, 2006

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    Tintagel Castle is one of the most spectacularly beautiful places in the whole of south-west England. It lies on a finger of land projecting into the sea from the flat plateau of North Cornwall; half of the castle is on the mainland, while the other half is reached by crossing a narrow neck of land between two inlets of the sea.
    The area has been settled at least since Roman times - pottery and coins at the site suggests that it was a place of some importance, and milestones near by indicate that a Roman road may have run along the northern Cornish coast. It is possible that Tintagel may have been Durocornovium. Following the collapse of Roman rule in Britain, Tintagel may have been a stronghold of the kings or princes of Dumnonia - clearly the ruler here was a man of considerable importance; a larger quantity of luxury goods have been found here than at all the other known 'Dark Age' sites in Western Europe put together.
    By the time Richard, Earl of Cornwall (the brother of Henry III) built his castle here, the fortress had become firmly associated with the legend of King Arthur - which may partly explain why the Earl chose to build a castle in a site of no real strategic importance.

    Entrance costs £4.30

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    Tintagel Castle - The Chapel

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    The tiny chapel, dedicated to St Juliot, was probably built around the late 11th c.; strangely between the abandonment of the Dark Age settlement and the building of the castle. It continued to be used after the castle was built, when the original door in the south-west corner was blocked up and the entrance moved to the west end and covered by a small porch or tower.
    More low stone walls lie around the chapel, remnants of quite a large complex of buildings of various dates - some Dark Age and some medieval. One was used as the foundations of the chapel, leading to speculation of Christian worship on the Island during the Dark Ages.

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    Tintagel Castle - Southern Cliffs

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    The huge amount of luxury goods from the Mediterranean found in this area of Tintagel has suggested that these cliffs may have played an important part in ceremonies when Tintagel was a stronghold of a Dark Age king or prince of Dumnonia. It has been speculated that such ceremonies may have included celebrations of ancestry, power and fealty.

    Personally I wouldn't have wanted to stand near these cliffs if the loyalty of my followers was in any doubt!

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    Tintagel Castle - The Well

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    The shallow depression on the top of the Island is the only natural water-catchment at Tintagel, and several natural springs run from it. The well is medieval in date, and must have been the main source of water for the castle, apart from any water collected from the roofs of the buildings.

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    Tintagel Castle - The Tunnel

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    The short length of tunnel to the west of the garden is a bit of a mystery - no-one really knows what purpose it originally had. The most likely suggestion is that it was dug in the Middle Ages as a larder for the castle - the sea wind would have driven through it, keeping stored foodstuffs cool. However, there are similar tunnels, known as fogous, in prehistoric sites in Cornwall (eg Carn Euny and Chysaustre) - the purpose of these is similarly unknown, but may well be of significance in dating the Tintagel example.

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    Tintagel Castle - The Garden

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    On the top of the Island, there is a small walled area, which once was probably a medieval garden. Since it would have been impractical to have a year-round garden at Tintagel (even in May it was cold and misty!) the garden may have been recreated from scratch for each visit of the Earl and his Countess, with potted flowers and shrubs.

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    Tintagel Castle - The Dark Age Houses

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    Along the sheltered sloping side of the Island are four groups of ruined buildings, low walls topped with grass and heather, and connected by narrow paths and steps. They were uncovered during archaeological excavations in the 1930s, and there are probably dozens more waiting to be found, a complete village strung along the hillside. The first buildings on this side of the island were put up around the early 5th century AD, but these were wooden, possibly temporary structures. The dating of the stone buildings is uncertain.

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    Tintagel Castle - the 'Iron Gate'

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    If you walk though the archway in the famous battlemented wall that is most often seen in photographs of Tintagel, a path to the right leads down to the Iron Gate - a defended rock-wharf where ships could be tied up in calm weather.

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    Tintagel Castle - The Island Courtyard

    by illumina Written Jun 3, 2006

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    At the top of the extremely steep steps leading up to the island section of the castle, you reach a battlemented wall with a gate through it. This was actually built by the local vicar in 1852, to replace the original 13th century wall which had fallen down the cliff behind it, along with one end of the Great Hall. To the right of the path you will see the service rooms belonging the far end of this Great Hall, while to the left, backed up against the steep grass slope are the remains of a two-roomed building with a flight of steps up the nearer wall towhere there was once an upper floor. This may have been a private chamber, intended for the use of the Earl on his rare visits to Tintagel.

    Most famous view... sadly obscured by mist! Window to the sea
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    Tintagel Castle - Entrance

    by illumina Updated Jun 3, 2006

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    The only way into the castle from the mainland was originally a narrow, naturally defended passageway; hence the name Tintagel - Fortress of the Narrow Entrance. It's likely that this method of access was set long before the medieval castle was built, as beyond the high crag of rock to the left of the entrace, a small settlement was established in the 3rd of 4th century AD; the crag would have allowed the inhabitants to control the approach. During the 5th or 6th century AD, the Ditch to the right of the approach was dug out, and the earth from it piled on the far side to create a bank which may have been strengthened by a wall or palisade. In this manner the path to the headland and island was restricted long before Earl Richard replaced these defences with stone walls.

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