Darlington Things to Do

  • The Darlington 'Brick Train'
    The Darlington 'Brick Train'
    by spidermiss
  • The Darlington 'Brick Train'
    The Darlington 'Brick Train'
    by spidermiss
  • The Darlington 'Brick Train'
    The Darlington 'Brick Train'
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Things to Do in Darlington

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    The Darlington 'Brick Train'

    by spidermiss Updated Dec 30, 2013
    The Darlington 'Brick Train'
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    This sculpture was commissioned by David Mach who created it in 1997 to celebrate Darlington's rich railway heritage. The 'Brick Train' was opened the same year and is situated next to Morrisons at Morton Park Industrial Estate.

    185,000 bricks were used in constructing the 'Brick Train' along with 170 cubic metres of concrete. It took just over five months to build by a team of 34 brick layers, labourers and apprentices.

    More information about the 'Brick Train' can be read via this website

    .

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    ST JOHN THE EVANGELIST

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 27, 2013
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    CHURCH OF ENGLAND
    Known locally as the railwaymans church, this grade II listed church was opened in January 1850.
    The foundation stone was laid in 1847. Money for the church was raised by subscription by George Hudson known as the railway king.
    John Middleton of York was the architect, he built it in the early English style.

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    THE MECHANICS INSTITUTE

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 27, 2013

    The Mechanics institute was built in 1854 to educate working men, many of these institutes were built around the country at that time.
    The building was designed by Joseph Sparkes.
    It is now night club called “Flares” and it has also been a bank.

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    THE CLOCK TOWER

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013
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    The clock tower is Darlington’s most famous landmark. It was a gift to the town from Joseph Pease. Joseph Pease was known in Darlington as “the father of the railway” (he started the Stockton-Darlington railway in 1826) he was also the first Quaker to be elected to parliament.
    The face of the clock was produced by Cooks of York and the bells cast by Warner and sons from Norton on Tees. Warner also cast the original Big Ben hour bell but it later cracked and had to be replaced.

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    THE MARKET HALL

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013

    The Victorian Market hall is in the centre of Darlington. Darlington won “market of the year” in 2008 and a market has been a tradition here since the 17th Century.
    It was designed by Alfred Waterhouse, who was a Quaker, in 1860 and it took 4 years to complete. Waterhouse went on the design Manchester Town Hall and The Natural History Museum in London, both amazing and magnificent buildings.

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    THE MARKET CROSS

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013
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    Dame Dorothy Brown presented the Market Cross to the people of Darlington in 1727. A market cross was used to mark a market town and is usually placed in the market place. Darlington’s Market cross was kept in storage for many years before being restored and placed here in 1993.

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    THE HOLE IN THE WALL

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013

    This pub is believed to take its name from a hole in the medieval boundry wall that surrounded Darlington. George Butterfield was once landlord of the pub, he ran the fastest mile in 1906. He also represented Great Britain at the 1908 olympics in London. He died at the Somme in 1917.

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    THE PENNYWEIGHT

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013
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    The Penny weight is a grade II listed building. In the 18th Century it was a common bakery where people would bring their uncooked bread and pies that they had made at home to be baked. They would pay for this service by the weight of their food. A set of scales hang from the front of the building.
    It is now a pub.

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    ST CUTHBERTS CHURCH

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013

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    ST CUTHBERTS CHURCH
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    CHURCH OF ENGLAND
    This beautiful church is a Grade I listed building. The church was built in 1183 and named in honour of St Cuthbert whose sacred bones passed this way around 873 AD, when monks from Lindisfarne carried Cuthbert’s bones in a coffin on a cart to protect them against Viking invaders.
    The church is known locally as “the lady of the north”.
    300 skulls were removed from the church when flooring was relaid in the 1800’s.
    Local legend believes that a ghost of Lady Jarratt sits on the church walls, she is believed to have been murdered by Civil war soldiers and her gold ring stolen.

    CUTHBERT’S BODY
    St Cuthbert died in 687 AD. Pilgrims flocked to the Holy Island of Lindisfarne to see his resting place. In 793 AD England was invaded by Vikings from Scandinavia. The Vikings ransacked Lindisfarne and killed some of the monks that lived there. The remaining monks fled but came back later to find Cuthbert’s tomb untouched. The Vikings came back 80 years later so the monks of Lindisfarne took Cuthbert’s body in a coffin on a cart to keep them safe. They travelled the North-East with the coffin, taking him from Chester-le-street to Durham. At first the monks pushed the cart but eventually they acquired a horse to pull the cart. Some of the places that Cuthbert’s body was taken to for safe keeping included, Carlisle, Burnsall, Workington, Marton, Ormesby, Wilton, Kirkleatham, Billingham, Chester-le-street, Ripon, Stockto01325 358911n finally resting at Durham. A little church was built of wood at Durham for the bones to rest.
    On September 4th 999 a large stone church was erected and dedicated to St Cuthbert. It became known as the white church. Other holy relics were buried at this church including the Venerable Bede. When William the Conqueror invaded England the monks fearing he would destroy the bones of the holy people moved them back to Lindisfarne. After four months they returned to Durham. In 1104 Cuthbert’s shrine was placed in a new Norman Cathedral where they still are today behind the high altar. St Bede’s remains are in the west end of the Cathedral.

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    THE MARKET PLACE

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 26, 2013

    The market place held twice weekly markets until 1994 when it was redeveloped. It is now an open space used for festivals, fairs and pavement cafes in the summer. There still a few stalls that line the streets. The indoor market is still going strong, this takes place in the market hall.
    When I visited there was an Easter fun fair in the market place.

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    St Augustine's Church

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 18, 2012
    St Augustine
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    This Catholic Church opened by Father William Hogarth, a Catholic Bishop in Hexham, in 1827 and was designed in a Gothic architectural style by Ignatius Bonomi.

    Please check out the church's website for a description of the building's interior and exterior.

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    Edward Pease Free Library

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 17, 2012
    Edward Pease Free Library, Darlington
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    The city library is known as Edward Pease Free Library. Edward Pease, a Quaker and a wool merchant, left a considerable amount of money in his will for a free library to be built. The library was built from 1884 to 1885 with an extension in 1933.

    Today it functions as a library and also serves as a tourist information point (as Darlington's dedicated tourist information office has closed). Visitors can able to stock up information on Darlington and in County Durham. Please take note of the Pease family coast of arms above the main entrance and the W.T. Stead plaque outside the library.

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    Friends' Meeting House & Burial Ground

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 17, 2012
    Friends Meeting House, Darlington
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    Quakers played key roles in shaping Darlington during the 19th Century such as Edward Pease, who had a prominent role in the railways and Joseph Priest, who was a Member of Parliament. They also were a big influence in the manufacturing industry soon after the Industrial Revolution and bankers (owned a few banks in the town).

    The present meeting place was enlarged in 1839 and still is used as a place of worship today. The building is opened to the public on weekdays and for worship on Sundays.

    The burial grounds is interesting to explore and one can see the graves of those who played an influencial role in shaping Darlington in the 19th Century such as the Pease, Backhouse and so forth.

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    St Cuthbert's Church

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 17, 2012
    St Cuthbert's Church, Darlington
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    This church is know as 'The Lady of the North'. Built in 1183 and named after St Cuthbert, a patron saint in the north of England, whose sacred bones were nearby at the time. The church was first of its kind in England and when the church's renovation including flooring was done approximately 300 skulls were exhumed from the internal graves. Architectural features include the 14th Century belfry and front and 15th Century microseconds.

    I didn't have opportunity to look inside but plan to on a future visit.

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    Clock Tower

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 17, 2012
    Clock Tower, Darlington
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    The Clock Tower is Darlington's icon. Joseph Pease donated the clock to the town in 1854. The clock face and tower bells were done by Yorkshire and Durham manufacturers. The clock still ticks and rings today!

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Darlington Things to Do

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