Coniston Things to Do

  • Richard with warning signs, Wrynose/Hardknot Pass
    Richard with warning signs,...
    by chizz
  • Beautiful scenery near Wrynose Pass
    Beautiful scenery near Wrynose Pass
    by chizz
  • In the middle of nowhere!
    In the middle of nowhere!
    by chizz

Most Recent Things to Do in Coniston

  • tvor's Profile Photo

    John Ruskin Museum

    by tvor Written Apr 18, 2014

    The John Ruskin museum tells some of the story of Coniston. It was founded by W.G. Collinwood who was secretary to artist John Ruskin who died in 1900 (the museum opened in 1901 as a memorial to him as well as depicting the surrounding area of Coniston). There are interactive displays and lots of information signs.

    The museum has some nice displays of linen and lace, geology and social history, mining and farming and a section honouring World War veterans including a local man who was awarded the Victoria Cross in WWI. His motorbike is there on display. There’s a miniature stone version of the village out behind the building.

    There’s a larger gallery that focuses on John Ruskin himself, including artifacts, books, letters, photographs and many of his paintings and drawings. He was an important man in the art world in the 1800s, being a strong defender of J.M.W.Turner and a strong influence to the artists of the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Most of his paintings are water colours and are nature-related or architectural features. Ruskin’s house, Brantwood, is on the opposite side of the lake and can also be visited.

    Another newer gallery in the museum told the story of Donald Campbell. I had never heard of him but he and his father both endeavored to break speed records on land and on water with various types of vehicles and boats. Donald Campbell died in 1967 while attempting to break his own speed record on water in his Bluebird K7 speed boat on Lake Coniston. The boat flipped and crashed on the water and his body was not found until 2001. They had photos and models of his boats and his father’s cars and they had pieces of the wreckage including a boiler suit that his remains were found in. Kind of creepy!

    There is a small gallery as well on the second floor and a little gift shop.

    Cost is 6 pounds and an extra pound if you want to take no-flash photos. The main floor of the museum is accessible and that's mainly what you'll want to see anyway. Open 10 to 5:30 during the spring to fall months. Reduced hours in the winter.

    piece of the wreckage from Bluebird K7

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  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    Steam Yacht Gondola

    by nickandchris Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    What a great sight the steam yacht Gondola is, sailing graciously up and down Conison Water.

    She is a rebuild of a steam yacht built in 1859, which in 1860 first took passengers for cruises on Coniston Water. Way back then, you travelled according to your purse, there being three seperate classes.

    By 1936 the boat was looking a little run-down and was retired, but was put to use in 1945 onwards as a houseboat. In the early 1960's storms beached it and it sank. I hope all occupants had already fled!!

    In the early 70's the yacht was rescued by a group of enthusiasts who rebuilt it to the same design as the original Gondola, managing to retain some of it's original features. It then belonged to the National Trust who re-launched Gondola in 1980.

    Today, it is a popular tourist trip, making a circular tour of Coniston Water and calling at the former home of John Ruskin, Brantwood, also owned by the National Trust.

    It's a strange fact, but I remember this boat lying beached at the south end of the lake in the very early 70's. My friend's dad helped out at Water Park, an old mansion on the west side of the lake. This is where he pointed Gondola out to us. He later went on to own Water Park, until his death in later years. Little was I to know how famous this wreck of a boat was to become!!!!

    Sails from Coniston Pier, daily,(in season) from 11am until 4pm.

    Travel in style, Gondola Coniston Water Jetty on Coniston Water Coniston Water
    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Cruise

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    Hardknot and Wrynose Passes - Steepest roads in UK

    by chizz Written Sep 3, 2008

    Why not admire the scenery of the Lakes from the steepest roads in the UK - the Wrynose and Hardknot Passes which have gradients of 25 and 30%. Our family sized car just made it but it would be easier in a 4 wheel drive vehicle.

    Richard with warning signs, Wrynose/Hardknot Pass Beautiful scenery near Wrynose Pass Another warning sign! In the middle of nowhere! One of many sheep!!!

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  • misodiva's Profile Photo

    Hill Top Beatrix Potter house

    by misodiva Written Jul 23, 2007

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    This is where Beatrix Potter lived when writing her beautiful books. The house is small, so the actual tour doesn't take too long, but the charm is large. As most children who grew up on her books seeing the garden and house was too cute. The smallish giftshop mostly has children's gifts. I recommend buying the National Trust booklet with a room by room description.

    I don't know how excited children would be about coming here, there are some other sights that are more geared towards children and her books around the area. There is usually a wait as timed tickets are used. Plan to wait about an hour.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel

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    Windermere Lake Cruises

    by misodiva Written Jul 23, 2007

    This was nice to do on a rainy day. The antique steamers were not so nice to travel in, as it was cold and inside you can't see much. The more modern less attractive boats provided better views in a warm inclosed area. We went from Ambleside to Bowness and back.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    Coniston Launch and Boat Hire

    by nickandchris Updated Mar 27, 2007

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    Coniston Launch is a boat service running up and down Coniston Water, using traditional timber built boats with electric engines!! The boats call at various jetties on the lake, including Brantwood, John Ruskin's home.

    There are a variety of services, including an evening cruise where you are allowed to take your own alcohol and enjoy the beauty of the lake on summer evenings. Very popular, this one, so make sure you book!!! There are other runs, of differing lengths, some sailing the entire length of the lake, and theme based trips like Swallows and Amazons. See website for full details.

    From Coniston Boating Centre, you can also hire rowing boats and electrically powered ones for char fishing. Quite costly, these!! Also, canoes, sailing dingies, whatever takes your fancy.Here, you will also find the Bluebird cafe, serving light refreshments and you will also want to feed the ducks, geese and swans that are always starving.

    http://www.lake-district.gov.uk/txtonly/coniston_boating_centre

    Ticket office for boat hire Bluebird cafe From waterhead Don't forget the birds.... Coniston Launch
    Related to:
    • Cruise
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Fishing

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  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    Coniston Water

    by nickandchris Updated Mar 27, 2007

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    Coniston Water is 5 miles long and up to half a mile wide. It is the 3rd largest lake in the Lake District and is probably the second best known, the first being Windermere.

    Coniston village nestles at the head of the lake with Coniston Old Man behind, standing 2,635 ft.

    Water speed records first took place on Coniston in the 20th century and continued to do so until very recently. Donald Campbell lost his life in the 1960's attempting to beat his own record. He actually reached the incredible speed of 320 mph. in Bluebird before losing control and flipping the boat over. All was lost and his body and boat have just been recovered in 2001 from the lake bed. Divers are still finding odd parts from Bluebird and indeed, when we visited Coniston Water in March 2007, divers were seen in many places.

    The lake is a popular place for swimming, boating of all sorts (apart from power boats) wind surfing, fishing, picnicking or even just sitting watching people at play. Electric boats can be hired for the infamous char fishing (an ancient breed of fish specific to Lakeland waters.) There are also many lake shore walks and a series of car parks on the quieter, less popular eastern side, have forest walks leading from them.

    Every year, Coniston Water Festival is held, where a series of water based activities take place over a week.

    The lake is accessible from both eastern and western sides, but parking is more limited on the major route, the western side, apart from a largish pay and display carpark.

    No swimming today.... From the eastern side Bit choppy... Only fit for ducks... Looking a little wild....
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • JamalMorelli's Profile Photo

    Ruskin Museum

    by JamalMorelli Updated Jan 14, 2007

    Asked that I don't take pictures instead without signing something - so no pics.

    Wonderful place, informed and friendly people. Use their website to learn more about what's inside.

    For myself - becoming familiar with the genius of John Ruskin was the draw. And anyone who defends Turner's paintings is a friend in spirit. Learn more about the great man at the museum.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ruskin

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Cruising Coniston

    by sandysmith Updated May 12, 2004

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    Five miles long, and with a maximum depth of 184 feet, Coniston Water is the third largest of the lakes. An elegant victorian steam yacht is a great way to explore the lake.
    It is the oldest steam yacht in the North of England being built in 1859 by the Furness Railway Company.

    The trip round the lake starts at Coniston Pier, proceeding anti-clockwise past Coniston Hall (a working farm owned by the National Trust) to Park-a-Moor (no stop). The journey then continues northwards, stopping at Brantwood, the home of John Ruskin from 1871 until his death in 1900. The yacht then travels the short distance across the lake back to Coniston Pier.
    For details of operation and timetable check out their website.

    Yacht steamer on Coniston
    Related to:
    • Cruise

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  • Arm-Chair-Hero's Profile Photo

    Campsite At Conniston

    by Arm-Chair-Hero Written Aug 21, 2003

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    This only applies if you want to go camping. Just outside Conniston there is a place called Conniston Hall, this is a large campsite that I highly recomend. The price is cheap and the facilities are good. Next to the camp site is Conniston lake, it has easy access and it looked like quite a large percentage of the people on the site used the lake for water activities...wind surfing etc etc

    Flying Mallets

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