Keswick Off The Beaten Path

  • A Public Footpath
    A Public Footpath
    by WheninRome
  • Tombstones at St. Cuthbert's Cemetery
    Tombstones at St. Cuthbert's Cemetery
    by WheninRome
  • St. Cuthbert's Cemetery
    St. Cuthbert's Cemetery
    by WheninRome

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Keswick

  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    St. Cuthbert's Church - Lorton

    by WheninRome Updated Nov 13, 2010

    We stumbled upon St. Cuthbert's Church on our first afternoon in the Lake District. We arrived at Winder Hall early in the afternooon, had a delicious snack of tea and scones, and then went for a walk to explore the area and relax. Following roads and public footpaths brought us to St. Cuthbert's. The church is unassuming, but beautiful in a simple way, especially the belltower.

    We wandered around the grounds and the cemetery, which was also fascinating. The graves were old and beautiful.

    The Church from the Rear Tombstones at St. Cuthbert's Cemetery Grave St. Cuthbert's Cemetery

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    Public Footpaths

    by WheninRome Written Nov 13, 2010

    I loved the public footpaths that crisscross the many areas of the Lake District that make taking a walk so delightful. These footpaths frequently went through farmer's fields (which would never happen in the U.S.) where their cattle or sheep were grazing.

    A Public Footpath Another Public Footpath
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Cumberland Pencil museum..

    by marsistanbul Written Aug 18, 2009

    The Cumberland Pencil Museum is the only attraction in the world devoted exlusively to the rich and fascinating history of the pencil.From the discovery of Borrowdate graphite in the early 1500's to the formation of the Cumberland Pencil Company in 1832,the museum charts the development of the humble pencil through the centuries.
    How to find Pencil museum...
    On foot:only a short walk from Keswick town centre,walk down the main street from the Tourist Information Centre following the fingerposts.,straight on,then turn right immediately prior to the road bridge over the River Greta,the museum is on your left..
    Opening times
    open all year,daily 9.30am-last admission 4.00pm
    closed 25th and 26th december and 1st january

    Cumberland Pencil museum
    Southey Works,Keswick,Cumbria CA12 5NG U.K.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Talking point

    by iandsmith Written Dec 30, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pink elephants they weren't, but they still caught your attention. These lovely sheep (Suffolk I believe) with their spray painted wool were in several parts of England. One can but assume it had something to do with the possibility of people seeking some cheap wool but I didn't ascertain the real reason. They were cute though. Had I seen them flying I would really have been worried.
    The second shot was taken in almost the same spot at Ullswater looking in the opposite direction towards the dramatic drive out of the valley and over the pass.

    Time to start worrying? Ullswater landscape
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    The crossing and the cauldron

    by iandsmith Written Dec 29, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    So I walked beside the boiling frothing cauldron to the main fall, whose presence was announced in advance by the water's roar. I remember coming down the stairway leading to the main view and saying "wow". Wordsworth was more expressive.
    After a walk along this part of Ullswater, Wordsworth wrote 'I wandered lonely as a cloud'.
    In 1906 Gowbrrow Park, including Aira Force, came up for sale for housing plots. An appeal was launched by the recently formed National Trust, which resulted in the purchase of 750 acres.
    The bridges, in addition to looking great and allowing passage across the river, are in honour of two members of the Spring-Rice family from nearby Watermillock, and were erected by friends and members of the family. In All Saints Church at Watermillock are memorial tablets to members of the Spring-Rice family, one of whom wrote the words to the hymn 'I vow to thee my Country'.
    An audio trail on cassette is available from the National Trust information vehicle for those with impaired vision, together with a 'talking postcard'. Wheelchair and pram access to Aira Beck is possible but the waterfall mainly requires walking.
    There's the cafe by the car park, to which Rosemarie had retired but later I met her on the trail after she was suitably refreshed. It contains information panels describing the area and its history. Leaflets are available describing the story of Aira Force and Gowbarrow, and family walks from the car park.

    Photogenic bridge, in memory of..... The cauldron
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    May the force be with you

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 29, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There's one attraction I'm always looking for when it rains, and that's waterfalls. I figured, "Cut your losses, head for the plunging river". So it was that we pulled into the carpark and unpacked our umbrellas. Well, I did anyway, Rosemarie opting to duck over to the on site cafe and have a cuppa.
    So I squelched my way, past the carpark attendant with National Trust advertising material on display and commenced the walk upwards. I should add here there is another carpark up the top from where you can walk down to the falls but, hey, I love coming down on the way back.
    This is the most famous of the Lake District waterfalls, the main force falls 70 feet from below a photogenic stone footbridge. Aira Force provides a glimpse of a landscaped Victorian park with dramatic waterfalls, arboretum and rocks scenery.
    In the 1780's the Howard family of Greystoke Castle had an old hunting lodge or Pele tower close to the Ullswater shore renovated into what is now Lyulph's Tower, set among its own sporting estate. They landscaped the area around the force and used it as a pleasure garden, planting over half a million native and ornamental trees, and established a network of tracks, footpaths and bridges. In 1846 the Howards created an arboretum below Aira Force, planting over 200 specimen conifers (firs, pines, spruces and cedars) from all over the world, including a Sitka Spruce 118 feet high.

    Between the two falls High enough to be a sitka spruce
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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    Ullswater it is then

    by iandsmith Written Dec 28, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    He seemed insistent. He certainly influenced me to the point that I altered my itinerary. Goodbye Wastwater, hello Ullswater. The owner of the B&B I was to stay at had suggested that Wastwater was not worth the trip. I may never know. Ullswater certainly was.
    In spite of the inclement weather (a bonus at Aira Force) I made the trip.
    Rounding a curve where the expanse of the lake becomes much more apparent I espied a yacht on the almost still waters. The lack of wind was immediately apparent in the lack of progress it was making.
    I also noticed that if I could get them tacking in front of a small island it might make a nice shot. Thus it was that I pulled into the first available carpark and set the camera up on the tripod. Autumn leaves would help frame the picture.
    I waited.............and waited and waited. Their frustration became my frustration. Time passed by, but the boat was barely moving until, almost without warning, it almost imperceptably began to turn. As is broadened out against the small island I snapped. I hope you enjoy the result.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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  • steventilly's Profile Photo

    Portinscale

    by steventilly Updated Sep 12, 2003

    There's not a great deal at Portinscale; there's a pub, a cafe, a "cute" suspension bridge over the river and some hotels, yet despite this we tend to go there on every visit to Keswick that we make.
    For us the best thing in Portinscale is one of the hotels, The Derwentwater. We've stayed there a few times in their self catering apartments which are *very* comfortable and especially cosy in the wintertime.
    The hotel is great too, and has a huge conservatory at the back overlooking its garden and right down to the lake. When we go there now we go to spend a while in the conservatory, having a coffee or afternoon tea, and reading a book. It's lovely.
    The pub in the village (The Farmer's Arms) is Jennings, and you'll find it almost where the road out joins the A66.

    Portinscale Suspension Bridge

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    Crosthwaite Church

    by steventilly Updated Sep 12, 2003

    Crosthwaite is on the edge of Keswick, you'll pass by it if you walk from Keswick to Portinscale.
    Canon Rawnsley, the founder of the National Trust and Robert Southey the Poet Laureate are both buried in the churchyard, along with some other prominent people.
    The church is quite pretty, in a "solid" sort of way, and is nicely set against the backdrop of hills.

    Crosthwaite Church

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Keswick Off The Beaten Path

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