Keswick Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07

Most Recent Things to Do in Keswick

  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Egremont Castle

    by WheninRome Updated Aug 31, 2010
    Gatehouse
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    If visiting St. Bee's, a trip to Egremont Castle is worthwhile; however, I would not drive to the coastal area just for this. My wife and I enjoyed it however, probably because we were the only ones there and had the castle to ourselves.

    The castle was built in the 12 century and must have been quite a structure. It took 150 years to build, but was only utilized briefly it is said. Today it is ruins and a park area. At least it was free and fun to roam around.

    Portions of the walls and gatehouse are intact. Give yourself 0.5 to 0.75 hour to roam the site and relax.

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    Go to the Coast

    by WheninRome Updated Aug 31, 2010

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    St. Bee's Head Cliffs
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    One of the first things I recommend that you do upon arriving in the Lake District, is to leave the Lake District for a day at the coast. We did this with a drive over to St. Bees and Egremont. We spent most of our time at St. Bees and fell in love with the place.

    My favorite thing to do at St. Bees was to hike. The town lists a number of local hikes for you to choose from and maps are available on the internet (link below). We did the hike from the parking area (Seamill Lane Car Park) to St. Bees Head Lighthouse and back. It followed the coastal cliffs and was absolutely breathtaking and gorgeous. There are numerous sea birds, sheep in the fields, beautiful horizons and a lighthouse among other things. Along this cliff there is even the foundation remains of a U-boat observatory from WWII and at low tides the remnant of a shipwreck offshore.

    I had hoped to do the walk that goes through town, but we simply didn't have enough time. You could easily spend an entire day taking a couple of the different St. Bees hikes.

    I was also amazed that there were so few Brits and other tourists at the beach. I think my wife and I were the only foreigners there. One small group of Brits hiking that we asked to take our picture were quite taken by the fact that Americans had found their "little" St. Bees.

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  • RoscoeGregg's Profile Photo

    The Cumberland Pencil Museum

    by RoscoeGregg Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    We are AMAZED again
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    Barbara had to drag Maybel and me to this museum. As it turns out we had a blast. I really enjoyed the time spent and learned a bit about some things. I really have to say I never thought how nice it is to have a pencil. I was totally shocked to find that graphite was such a valuable material at times.

    There are lots of displays that cover the development of pencils. Which when you think of it is one of the most durable and useful technologies we have. Some are a bit dated in a fun way.

    One word of warning: if you are traveling with anyone of artistic bent as you enter the gift shop at the end inform them that you are going for a cup of tea and they can look you up in a couple of hours when the are done shopping. The collection of pencils and pastels is well, simply mind boggling.

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    The MOOT HALL

    by marsistanbul Written Oct 10, 2008

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    the Moot Hall

    The origins of this building are obscure.As early as 1571,there is a reference to a Court House in the market place.Tradition suggest it was built in 1695 with materials from the Earl of Derwentwater's family mansion on Lord's Island,Derwentwater.The present building dates from 1813 and has been used as a manor courthouse,a butter and fruit market,a prison,a museum and a town hall.It one-handed clock may be seen on the west end above the steps.The moot Hall now houses a well equipped Information and Accommodation Booking Centre..

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    Castlerigg Stone Circle - nr. Keswick

    by chizz Written Sep 3, 2008

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    Feeling the magic of the Castlerigg Stone Circle
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    Castlerigg Stone Circle has been owned by the National Trust since 1913 and was one of the first dozen sites to be declared an ancient monument in 1883.
    It is believed to have been built by local farmers between 2500 and 1300 BC during the Neolithic and Bronze Ages from Borrowdale volcanic stones which were moved to their locations on giant rollers. The circle is believed to have been built to calculate the cycle of the seasons which was important for the farming community. Another belief is that the local community came to the circle to barter livestock, exchange partners and celebrate local festivals.
    Entrance is free to the circle but you need to look out for it as it is not well signposted!

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    Cumberland Pencil Museum, Keswick

    by chizz Written Sep 3, 2008

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    The worlds longest pencil, Cumberland Pencil Mus.
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    The Cumberland Pencil Museum is the only attraction of it's kind in the world, dedicating itself to the history of the pencil. With Borrowdale graphite being discovered in the 1500's near to Keswick, the Cumberland Pencil Company was formed in 1832. Shepherds were thought to have discovered the graphite following a storm which uprooted trees and exposed the underlying black deposits. They originally thought it was coal, but when it would not burn they used it to mark their sheep! It's fame spread and it was used for medicinal purposes as well cannon ball moulds, before being used as a writing and drawing tool.
    At the museum, you can learn all about the history of the pencil, watch a short film and see the world's longest pencil on display. There is also a shop selling pencils and other gifts and a cafe.
    The museum is open from 9.30am-5pm and hours are extended at peak times of the year. Adult tickets cost £3/students £2 and children £1.50 with under 5's free. Family tickets cost £7.50.

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    Beatrix Potter's Derwentwater

    by gigina Written Aug 31, 2008

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    Between 1885, when she was 19, and 1907, Beatrix Potter spent nine summer holidays at Lingholm and one at Fawe Park, the two stately homes whose estates now occupy most of the north western side of Derwentwater. The two houses, their gardens and the surrounding landscape provided material for several of her books.

    Beatrix Potter was born on 28 July 1866 in South Kensington, London. She lived a lonely life at home, being educated by a governess and having little contact with other people. She had many animals which she kept as pets, studying them and making drawings.

    Lingholm was built in the 1870's . During the 1890's it was unoccupied or let furnished in the summer. In the early 1900's it was bought by Colonel George Kemp, later Lord Rochdale, who developed the gardens and built terraces on the lake side. Lingholm's glory is its collection of rhododendrons and azaleas, many planted in the 1920's and 1930's. The woods around Lingholm were - and still are - the home of red squirrels and other woodland creatures. Beatrix sketched them many times in the summer of 1901 while working on the backgrounds for The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin. The Tale of Peter Rabbit uses Lingholm for scenes in the vegetable garden, with its distinctive wicket gate.

    On her 1903 visit to Lingholm, Beatrix bought a small sketchbook which she filled with sketches of local scenes. Published in 1984, the fascimile is a collector's item of considerable interest. Many of her sketches especially those looking across to St Herbert's Island and Walla and Falcon Craggs are easily recognisable. Owl Island in The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin is St. Herbert's Island, the destination of a convoy of squirrels who cross the lake on rafts using their tales as sails.

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  • Keswickian's Profile Photo

    Keswick Museum and Art Gallery

    by Keswickian Written Apr 30, 2008

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    When the weather is not so good try a visit to the museum. Described as a "Victorian Cabinet of Curiosities", entering the building is like stepping back in time.
    Not to be missed are the Musical Stones that you are encourages to play, the dead cat and an amazing collection of stuffed animals.
    Entry is free but donations are welcome.

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  • Three Things NOT to do!

    by lucia9998887 Written Jan 6, 2007

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    My family have two timeshare apartments in Underscar, for a week in July, about a mile away from keswick town. We have been going there for about 6 years so i know almost everything to do in the town, surrounding areas and places a bit further away aswell.
    The first year we went we visited all the touristy places like the beatrix potter museum a few miles down the road, derwent water etc, and we also visited 'Cars for the Stars' museum, not only is it very boring but my two young cousins found it very distressing, if that is your sort of thing fine but its a bit of a shambles in there. Next is the unsurprisingly tedious Derwent Pencil Museum, i'm very into art myself and the Derwent art products are of an excellent quality however the same can't be said for the museum itself. There is a room full of all colours, shapes and sizes of every pencil imaginable, a brief and somewhat uninteresting written description of how the pencils are made and just as you are about to doze off there is a promise ofa glimpse of the worlds largest pencil!, alas it is only a small photo.
    Both these places are very corny but possibly worth a short visit, i certainly never want to go there again.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Midst the gloom

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 14, 2006

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    Portents of??
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    Overshadowed (on a clear day) by the nearby Blencathra, a rotund hill whose benign appearance can be deceiving if you're caught in a storm up there, the Castlerigg Stone Circle is one of Great Britain's most famous and, in Cumbria, the most visited. The latter is aided by its proximity to Keswick, from which it is very easily accessible. Castlerigg is one of the first stone circles to have been built in Britain, dating from around 3000 BC. Various theories have been put forward as to the circle's purpose, ranging from a burial site to an astronomical observatory. What is for certain is that, despite its popularity, this is a remarkable place of peace and tranquillity.
    It's also an eerie spot when you're there on your own and occasional drizzle is falling through the mist that covers stones. It's on a day such as this that you could get religion here.
    I was the only visitor and the ground squelched beneath my feet as the haze drifted across the misshapen rocks, all 38 of them. For sheer drama they don't come close to the likes of Stonehenge and some of those on the outer islands of Scotland, but you are left wondering their meaning.
    I have it on good authority that the view from here is quite beautiful on a good day. I have to say it wouldn't be anymore atmospheric than when I saw it.

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  • a walk a round derwentwater

    by stemc Written Jan 3, 2006

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    you can have a pleasurable walk around the lake just outside keswick center the views down the lake are fantastic on the day we went cold and frosty the sky a brilliant blue that you can only get in winter

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Keswick Town Centre

    by sandysmith Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    Keswick
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    The centre of Keswick is a bustling pedestrianised shopping centre with a market at the foot of the Moot Hall. The Moot Hall was built in 1813, and is noted for its unusual one-handed clock. It has served various functions - from court house to prison to fruit market but is now home to the tourist office and an art gallery. It looked really festive at Christmas time with the lights and Christmas tree. Good shopping for outdoor clothes in the sales too.

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    Buttermere explained

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 31, 2005

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    Showing me the way home
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    The name of this enticing small lake, just under 2 kms long, may derive from the verdant pastures at either end. The prominent Red Pike (see my second page), which doesn't overpower you but you can't help noticing it, rises from the western shore, along which a path can be found, linking the hamlet of Buttermere with Honister Pass. The Fish Inn is located at the former, and its claim to fame is that a daughter of one of the early owners married a bigamist and forger who was hanged in 1803, the incident described in "The Prelude" by William Wordsworth.
    The third shot is one of my favourites because it shows how vast the landscape can be.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The church

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 30, 2005

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    A church in the pink of condition

    We used to walk past it to and from the town square every day. I couldn't help but admire the lovely pinkish-toned brickwork.
    St John's Church was designed by Anthony Salvin, and the material selected for the construction was from quarries in the Eden Valley. The site for the Church was chosen by the founder, John Marshall, Lord of the Manor of Castlerigg. Salvin worked for John Marshall's brother William at Patterdale Hall, and later for another brother Henry, on rebuilding the house on nearby Derwent Isle. Sir John died before building was started, but the project continued, and his remains are interred below the centre aisle of the nave. It was consecrated on St John's Day, December 27th 1838.
    The building, in the Old English style, originally comprised the west tower and spire, and what is now the central nave and vestry. The son of the founder decided to enlarge the building, and in 1862 a north aisle was added, and columns were introduced to support the roof, so that the walls and windows could be moved outwards. 20 years later, the south aisle was added, and in 1889 the chancel was created.
    There is an interesting selection of stained glass by Henry Holiday. The east window, containing 20 panels, is said to be one of his best, and should be viewed early on a sunny morning. It is a memorial to John Marshall, the Church's founder, who died in 1836. Hanging above the North aisle, is a banner depicting the young Saint Herbert who lived on an island in Derwentwater during the seventh century. It was created by the internationally renowned sculptress Josefina de Vasconcellos, who was born in Brazil, and has lived in Cumbria most of her life.
    Outside the Church there are seats on the terrace for you to sit and enjoy one of the finest views of the hills around Keswick. In the graveyard is the grave of Sir Hugh Walpole, the novelist, who lived in Grange.

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    To market, to market

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 30, 2005

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    A happening town

    I can imagine this in summer. It would, as others suggest, be packed. Of course, with the intermittent drizzle we experienced and the cooling weather, crowds were not apparent.
    Indeed, it was quite pleasant sticking my nose beneath some of the canopies. Since I have a small interest in photography I was keen to look at what was on offer at some of the stalls that were selling local pictures. I was suitably impressed by the quality on offer, so different from the oh-so-ordinary postcards on sale at the day to day shops in the area. Were it not so early in the trip I might have even made a purchase. It was not to be.
    Keswick's traditional market offers a wide range of both locally and internationally produced pottery, carvings, crafts and clothes. You'll also find a tasty selection of home-made jams, preserves and other produce, as well as local meat.
    Keswick's market takes over the centre of town every Saturday, and there is a smaller market every Thursday.

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