Keswick Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07

Best Rated Things to Do in Keswick

  • tkdqueen's Profile Photo

    Ponderous pose

    by tkdqueen Updated Feb 21, 2004

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    We've decided wherever we go together we'll continue to do this - Ponderous/catalogue pose.
    We already started the ponderous pose at her wedding 2.5 years ago - if I find the pic I'll load it!
    We've been friends since we were 12 - as you can see we keep each other young!!!!
    Oh well - I'd rather be laughing than be miserable!!!

    Amanda thinking

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  • DOUGALSMUM's Profile Photo

    Dont be a wimp-its not that far

    by DOUGALSMUM Written Feb 13, 2004

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    A Great way to pass a day is to do the circular walk around Derwentwater, I have read various reports that it isbetween 6 and 10 miles for the whole circuit-however long it is its a lovely walk , lakeside for much of it ,it is very scenic.There are a few places to stop and have a snack or meal, most of them in the area of Ladore Falls, so you could make a little side trip after lunch to see the falls before continuing on your circuit.
    The walk is clearly marked on the maps, and almost as clearly marked on the route itself.
    As long as you are reasonably fit you should have no trouble completing the circuit- and the beauty of it is that if you do think you have walked enough you just stroll to the next landing stage and get a ferry back to your starting point ( in high season- the ferries run less frequently off season).

    a view taken whilst on the circular walk
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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • tkdqueen's Profile Photo

    Tried here maybe?

    by tkdqueen Written Feb 21, 2004

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    I expect the same witches were thrown into the water here to see if they were witches as they did in the old days!!!
    History states the rule was:
    If they sank and drowned they WERE NOT witches.
    If they lived (if they could swim!) they WERE witches and they were condemned to death!!!

    They couldn't win!!!!
    (Blimey Amanda you were right - I think too much!!!!!)

    I'm spooking myself!!

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    What a surprise

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    After Ashness Bridge, the next thing you come to is Surprise View. The thing that surprised me was how many people there were. It's on a narrow, and I don't emphasise there, road that winds its way up the hill to Watendlath (see next tip).
    This place can get crowded and, having seen the view, I can readily understand why. It would have to be in the top ten in England. I took a sequence a 8 shots and have included 5 here to give you some idea of just how panoramic it is.

    Looking to Borrowdale Road Derwent Water Derwent Water with Keswick on the right Looking to Keswick
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    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The slate mine

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 28, 2005

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    Frankly, I wasn't even aware of the name Honister Pass and, as I drove past it the first morning you couldn't even see it, just a stone wall appeared in my headlights before the road swung right. What it is though, as I discovered the next day, is the location for a slate mine for tourists. The mine offers free parking for cars and mininbuses, but no coaches please, so there's a plus for the independent tourist.
    The present owners offer the visitor a guided tour of the mine which is available several times a day. The tour includes many a unique underground feature that are still in situ and the knowledgeable guides, with a background in the industry, provide an interesting history of the mine. Both modern and traditional methods are used to extract the slate but, for me, I wouldn't want to work there. The dust in your lungs would be horrific.
    Whether or not it will get your adrenaline up I don't know but, hey, there's a free cuppa in the Bait Cabin after the tour where, in colder times, you can warm yourself by the fire. For those not wishing to go underground, there is free entry into the Visitor Centre, just like any tourist place you've ever been to. In the gift shop, natural green slate is the predominant gift. You can have your house name engraved on it while you wait, or buy a house sign by mail order, or fill up your car boot for 10.00 pounds! Not so daft as it sounds as the slate is ideal for rockeries, paving and walling. Yep, just like you see all around Keswick and the Lake District in general.
    Unlike slate taken from quarries, the Westmoreland Green Slate is wholly extracted underground and is entirely environmentally friendly. Its beauty graces both the roofs of humble cottages and magnificent buildings, such as those in Regent Street, London, the Ritz Hotel, St James Palace, RAF Cranwell and the Deutsche Bundesbank.
    The mine itself is not photogenic, take my word, but the road leading down to Buttermere is sublime. I'll leave you with it.

    The long and winding road to Buttermere
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Disabilities
    • Road Trip

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    To market, to market

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 30, 2005

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    I can imagine this in summer. It would, as others suggest, be packed. Of course, with the intermittent drizzle we experienced and the cooling weather, crowds were not apparent.
    Indeed, it was quite pleasant sticking my nose beneath some of the canopies. Since I have a small interest in photography I was keen to look at what was on offer at some of the stalls that were selling local pictures. I was suitably impressed by the quality on offer, so different from the oh-so-ordinary postcards on sale at the day to day shops in the area. Were it not so early in the trip I might have even made a purchase. It was not to be.
    Keswick's traditional market offers a wide range of both locally and internationally produced pottery, carvings, crafts and clothes. You'll also find a tasty selection of home-made jams, preserves and other produce, as well as local meat.
    Keswick's market takes over the centre of town every Saturday, and there is a smaller market every Thursday.

    A happening town
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Seniors

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The bridge

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    If you only had time to do one thing whilst at Keswick, this is part of what I would advise.
    En route to Surprise View and Watendlath, Ashness Bridge is one of Lakeland's most idyllic scenes; a fine packhorse bridge spanning a babbling, rocky brook, with views over Derwentwater to the mighty peak of Skiddaw beyond.
    This view is never forgotten and Ashness Bridge is claimed to be one of the most photographed places in the whole of the Lake District. Personally, I believe it's one of the most photographed bridges in all of England. I was there at shoulder season and there's still cars in the carpark and people queueing for the best spot to take that postcard snap from.
    The scene changes magically with the seasons, and in autumn the golden hues of the trees and the bracken on the fells add a burst of colour which cannot fail to delight all those who view it.
    I hope you enjoy my humble efforts at this and then you can journey further in my next tip.

    Ashness, gorgeous in any season The view back along the road Narrow packhorse bridge, definitely one way only Looking back to Derwentwater The rushing stream
    Related to:
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    • National/State Park
    • Seniors

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  • RoscoeGregg's Profile Photo

    The Cumberland Pencil Museum

    by RoscoeGregg Updated Feb 15, 2010

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    Barbara had to drag Maybel and me to this museum. As it turns out we had a blast. I really enjoyed the time spent and learned a bit about some things. I really have to say I never thought how nice it is to have a pencil. I was totally shocked to find that graphite was such a valuable material at times.

    There are lots of displays that cover the development of pencils. Which when you think of it is one of the most durable and useful technologies we have. Some are a bit dated in a fun way.

    One word of warning: if you are traveling with anyone of artistic bent as you enter the gift shop at the end inform them that you are going for a cup of tea and they can look you up in a couple of hours when the are done shopping. The collection of pencils and pastels is well, simply mind boggling.

    We are AMAZED again Size Does Matter The Unasuming Entrance
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • chizz's Profile Photo

    Castlerigg Stone Circle - nr. Keswick

    by chizz Written Sep 3, 2008

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    Castlerigg Stone Circle has been owned by the National Trust since 1913 and was one of the first dozen sites to be declared an ancient monument in 1883.
    It is believed to have been built by local farmers between 2500 and 1300 BC during the Neolithic and Bronze Ages from Borrowdale volcanic stones which were moved to their locations on giant rollers. The circle is believed to have been built to calculate the cycle of the seasons which was important for the farming community. Another belief is that the local community came to the circle to barter livestock, exchange partners and celebrate local festivals.
    Entrance is free to the circle but you need to look out for it as it is not well signposted!

    Feeling the magic of the Castlerigg Stone Circle Richard in the circle at Castlerigg Sign for the circle

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Over the hill

    by iandsmith Written Dec 28, 2005

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    Just behind Hope Park is the lake known as Derwent Water. It's up there with the prettiest stretches you're likely to find in this part of the world and, on a summer's day with some of the yachts fully rigged, it would be quite spectacular.

    Beyond Hope... ...and the weather's not improving
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Midst the gloom

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 14, 2006

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    Overshadowed (on a clear day) by the nearby Blencathra, a rotund hill whose benign appearance can be deceiving if you're caught in a storm up there, the Castlerigg Stone Circle is one of Great Britain's most famous and, in Cumbria, the most visited. The latter is aided by its proximity to Keswick, from which it is very easily accessible. Castlerigg is one of the first stone circles to have been built in Britain, dating from around 3000 BC. Various theories have been put forward as to the circle's purpose, ranging from a burial site to an astronomical observatory. What is for certain is that, despite its popularity, this is a remarkable place of peace and tranquillity.
    It's also an eerie spot when you're there on your own and occasional drizzle is falling through the mist that covers stones. It's on a day such as this that you could get religion here.
    I was the only visitor and the ground squelched beneath my feet as the haze drifted across the misshapen rocks, all 38 of them. For sheer drama they don't come close to the likes of Stonehenge and some of those on the outer islands of Scotland, but you are left wondering their meaning.
    I have it on good authority that the view from here is quite beautiful on a good day. I have to say it wouldn't be anymore atmospheric than when I saw it.

    Portents of?? What were they for? An eerie spectre on the hill
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors
    • Archeology

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Keswick Town Centre

    by sandysmith Updated Jan 1, 2006

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    The centre of Keswick is a bustling pedestrianised shopping centre with a market at the foot of the Moot Hall. The Moot Hall was built in 1813, and is noted for its unusual one-handed clock. It has served various functions - from court house to prison to fruit market but is now home to the tourist office and an art gallery. It looked really festive at Christmas time with the lights and Christmas tree. Good shopping for outdoor clothes in the sales too.

    Keswick Keswick
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  • mickeyboy07's Profile Photo

    Derwent Water

    by mickeyboy07 Written Nov 11, 2011

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    This is one of the principal bodies of water in the Lake District,it lies wholly within the borough of Allerdale in Cumbria.The lake occupies part of Borrowdale and lies directly south of the town of 'Keswick'.It is both fed and drained by the River Derwent and measures 3 miles long by 1 mile wide and in some parts can be up to 22 metres deep(72 feet).The lake is surrounded by hills(known locally as fells)and many of the slopes facing the lake are extensively wooded.A regular passenger ferry takes people to various stops around the lake including the Marina's of Portinscale and Lodore Falls.Recreational walking is a major tourist activity in these parts and an extensive network of footpaths exists within the hills and woods surrounding the lake.Taking a gentle stroll round the lake took us just over an hour and ten mins with a few stops to take pictures,well worth doing.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling
    • Sailing and Boating

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The bay window boogie

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 28, 2005

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    I couldn't say they were ugly, well, actually, I suppose I could but that wouldn't accurately reflect my feelings. What they had was a sameness, albeit a classy, upmarket, bay-windowed, window boxed with slate grey/green walls.
    The door frame on this one was just a little different from the others. Which is probably why I took the picture.
    What was really surprising was that they were all accommodation, all B&Bs, all an indication as to how many tourists come here and how dependent the local economy is on them. It's the most touristy place I've ever been to, and that's saying something.
    Purportedly there are more B&Bs per capita here than anywhere in Great Britain. Frankly, I think it would rate on a world scale.
    Somehow though, when we were there in shoulder season, it didn't seem crowded and there was always a seat at the restaurant and no queues at the supermarket so life was good.....................except for the weather.

    A typical B&B, Keswick style
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Seniors

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Watendlath

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    "The hamlet is reached by a very narrow road with passing places, from the Keswick to Borrowdale road. It can be quite an ordeal during busy periods. " Thus spaketh the local tourism pages. They don't exaggerate. Be prepared to stop and back up on occasions. I'm certainly glad I wasn't there in busy times, it must be a nightmare.
    The little hamlet of Watendlath, owned by the National Trust, sits high between the Borrowdale and Thirlmere valleys. It is 847 feet above sea level, with an attractive tarn surrounded by fells in a classic 'hanging valley'. Watendlath beck is the source for Lodore Falls - a tourist attraction from Victorian times and it's at the end of the road that crosses the Ashness Bridge and passes Surprise View. It's one of England's most scenic roads and you can choose to walk parts or all of it or drive up and pick a route from the many on offer.
    Watendlath itself also has an attractive packhorse bridge and a National Trust tea-room where you can refresh yourself after your endeavours.
    It costs to park there so, you have been warned.

    Looking down on Watendlath The slope I scrambled up to get the previous photo Love those stone fences The tarn and beyond
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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